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Submission + - The European Parliament calls on the European Union to migrate to Free Software

An anonymous reader writes: On October 29, 2015, the European Parliament adopted a report by Claude Moraes which condemned mass surveillance. This report calls on the European Union to migrate to free software, and to add free sofware as a mandatory selection criterion in IT public procurement. Frédéric Couchet, the executive director of the French free software advocacy group April, said that “This is the first time the European Parliament is explicitely calling for migration to free software. Even though such resolution is non-binding, it is a very strong signal to the European Commission.”

Submission + - Fallout 4 release raises questions about reviews of buggy games (

RogueyWon writes: Fallout 4, the latest instalment in the long-running video-game series and one of the most hyped titles of the year, was released on 10 November. The game has generally been reviewing well, currently holding a Metacritic score of 89. However, a number of reviewers have noted the very large number of bugs present in all versions of the game and have, in some cases, reflected on the difficulty that these pose for reviewers, despite still awarding positive overall write-ups. Can it be ethical to recommend a product to consumers on the basis of its strengths, despite knowing that it contains serious faults?

Submission + - Icy Volcanoes May Erupt on Pluto (

An anonymous reader writes: The New Horizons probe may have discovered two possible ice volcanoes on the surface of Pluto. "These are two really extraordinary features. Nothing like this has ever been seen in the solar system." Oliver White, a New Horizons postdoctoral researcher with NASA's Ames Research Center in California said. The mountains have been informally named Wright Mons and Picard Mons, and at their crests, each peak hosts a central crater, reminiscent of peaks called "shield volcanoes" on Earth. "Whatever they are, they're definitely weird" — 'volcanoes' is the least weird hypothesis at the moment," White says.

Comment Re:Security isn't a product (Score 1) 291

From their homepage: "Only two remote holes in the default install, in a heck of a long time!" Granted the default install can't do much, but the code was gone over in a massive audit. Everything is still checked for correctness.

Not saying Linux sucks, but I sleep better at night knowing OpenBSD powers much of what I am responsible for.

Comment Security isn't a product (Score 1) 291

Security in Linux has been looked at as something you bolt-on after the fact. It was not designed from the ground-up with security in mind. Look at OpenBSD as an example: rock solid security and when a rare remote exploit is found, it's usually news on sites like /.

Comment Re:The One True Model (Score 2, Insightful) 143

"The problem" started when people began to question His writings and opted to not circumcise their sons.

Science is a great thing, but God trickles out knowledge to us bit by bit to help us grow as his children. Unfortunately some people think Science is the be-all-end-all and ignore Him. That is why we have earthquakes, AIDS, and terrorists.

Comment Re:Disagree with the language used... (Score 1) 576

What empirical evidence is that? Most people don't understand the idea of the regression to the mean (check out the Kahneman quote here at a href="">here if you want a good example of why punishment seems to improve performance, but doesn't really). Also, as a long-time Linux user (since 1994) I have to say that as much as I like the OS, its success has been largely based on the fact that it was mostly the only game in town in terms of free UNIX systems at the time it came out, and was able to capitalize on that momentum since. The free BSD variants were having legal issues that a lot of people thought would sink them, Minix wasn't really a full OS, and everything else that would run on x86 software (and there weren't many) cost money. But at the end of the day Linux isn't uniquely well-designed or superior as compared to say, OS X. If other modern OSes can get by without a tantrum-throwing diva like Linus, I think it's safe to say it's not a necessary part of the development cycle.

Comment Re:Disagree with the language used... (Score 1) 576

"The reason Linus communicated in such a rude way was to prevent people from using those functions ever again in his codebase, and I think it will probably work."

Why do you think it would probably work? Over-the-top insults and tantrums typically don't work; it creates resistance and anger, and is a very unproductive way to deal with things. It kills loyalty, it saps motivation, and it causes resentment. More importantly in terms of whether the mistake is going to be made again, it makes it more likely that it will happen again than if a softer approach had been taken, due to cognitive dissonance. The recipient of this kind of attack is more likely to think that the attacker is wrong in some way; the brain looks for a reason, and will probably find one. If the complaint had been conveyed more gently, in an explanatory rather than an accusatory claim, the coder would be far more likely to realize the error and not make it again.

Also just as a practical matter, it's not a great survival trait; one of these days Linus might very well mouth off to the wrong person and get a broken jaw in return.

"No, no, I don't mind being called the smartest man in the world. I just wish it wasn't this one." -- Adrian Veidt/Ozymandias, WATCHMEN