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Comment Hahahaha! Good luck Uber! (Score 1) 45

Here maps is the app that bundles with the Windows phone I believe. This single application is the main reason I score Nokia's Lumia series -1 out of a possible 0 to 5 score, where a score of 0 indicates the product is so defective that owners should request a refund from the manufacturer.

The phone doesn't do a single thing well, but at least most functionality doesn't involve you reentering the destination while driving every time the screen sleeps. It does other things, like recalculating your route because you just passed under a bridge, meaning your are obviously now driving on the bridge and a number of other equally as amusing quirks.

There are Samsungs, there are Apples, there are Blackberries and $30 asian smart phones, they all do a better job of mapping compared to Here Maps. I really like Uber's service, but I don't expect it to improve with the involvement of a new, extremely defective mapping system, and I don't think users of the service will be very happy if they have to start interacting with this application.

Comment Re:I was in a similar role (Score 1) 383

For a moment I thought you might be one of my previous bosses. :)

The system described by OP is very similar to my last position.... except we had about 300 users across APAC in various factories. ERP integrated into everything, including robotics on the assembly lines.

Two Engineers and 1 outsourced ERP consultant got the job done. When Engineering wasn't fixing routine problems, it was contributing software - either manufacturing, ERP or middleware.

You company management is probably correct. Too much staff in the wrong places. Need a receptionist? Get an SD application.

Comment Microsoft's relationship with XBOX confuses me (Score 1) 292

I would have thought (as a non-owner) that the X-BOX represents one of MS' victories in the consumer space. I wonder sometimes if MS hadn't just made their phone UI more like X-BOX they would have had a highly successful product.

And X-BOX represents an excellent PR opportunity through-out MS' range of products. It introduces consumers to a working, easy to use computer system that builds confidence in their product line and makes them relevant in every living room. I don't understand why companies keep hiring the same bad decision makers.

Comment Ye Olde Bookseller in the 21st Century! (Score 1) 176

As someone who needs to read a lot for their job, I find the definition of a book does not necessarily imply a square block made out of slivers of paper. In fact, any of the things like that that I have obtained in recent memory suffer due to lack of portability - I don't have enough additional carrying capacity to keep a book geographically close to myself for times when I want to read it.

If only there was a way for book stores to sell digital versions of the text with the item.... just like they did 12 years ago when I last had to buy an assload of textbooks.

To be fair, I don't own a Kindle. Why would I? I have notebook computers and smart phones and tablets, projectors and text-to-speech applications. Hell, even graphic calculators. I mean, you would HAVE to be blind to actually consider crappy-ass Kindles a realistic threat to your business in the wake of the countless other alternatives to read electronically.

Comment Re:bulls!@$ (Score 1) 53

So I guess you could call it the Media Whore Factor (MWF), or, the breadth and depth of data exposed to during a sitting rather than the quantity of media consumed.

So, someone skimming Reddit would have a far greater MWF than, say, someone watching Fox NEWS. This might be another way of indicating the relative worthlessness of conventional media that tend to drive viewers through a set of topics of subjectively varying interest.

I still call BS on this, however. I suspect there is a saturation limit on attention and information density, which this study doesn't seem to take into account. As someone else pointed out, extrapolation gone mad.

Comment That doesn't make sense in the context of Apple (Score 1) 214

Hell, just to make my damn phone work I need an iTunes subscription. That ties my phone to my credit card. Then they start spamming me with music suggesting software. They provide software so that police can remotely suck all the data off it. They release back doors so that even if my company remotely bricks it, I can restore my last backup and keep running.

I think its fair to say, Apple's business model very much relies on them being able to collect user data, or to connect users to ways they can share data.

If what they say is true, the iPhone would be an open platform that let me install what I wanted, rather than existing in this walled Apple Only Garden

What is now proved was once only imagin'd. -- William Blake

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