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The Almighty Buck

PayPal Withdraws WikiLeaks Donation Service 794

ItsIllak writes "The BBC are reporting that PayPal is the latest company to abandon WikiLeaks. The list now includes their DNS providers (EveryDNS) and their hosts (Amazon). PayPal's move is unlikely to result in many more people boycotting the company, as most knowledgeable on-line users will have been refusing to use them for years for a wide variety of abusive practices." Adds reader jg21: "As open source freedom fighter Simon Phipps writes in his ComputerWorldUK blog, behavior like this by Amazon and Tableau [and now PayPal] 'informs us as customers of web services and cloud computing services that we are never safe from intentional outages when the business interests of our host are challenged.'"

Submission + - Aussies petition to abolish software patents (

schliz writes: Australian free software enthusiasts, including open source luminaries Jonathan Oxer and Andrew Tridgell, have signed an open letter urging the Government to abolish software patents. The letter, which claims that "software patents are dangerous and costly to business and the community", is expected to be delivered to Innovation Minister Kim Carr this month, ahead of a Federal Advisory Council on Intellectual Property (ACIP) Review of Patentable Subject Matter report that will be released in early 2011.

Submission + - leave your PC on to extend it's life - Fail ( 2

wallydallas writes: A lot of ignorance seems to be flowing from industry experts in response to the story about a school district with 5,000 computers using the SETI at home software. PC Mag and a Carnegie Mellon CS professor are spreading the myth that you protect your computer if you don't power off. "Most advice given on computers nowadays is don't power them down," I'm a teacher in a large district with far too many computers left on overnight because the IT staff have a near dictatorship. How does a powerless teacher fight an oppressive IT staff who will not cooperate with teachers who want computers shut down after a decent time without any user activity. These tools exist and have been vetoed with the myth that they do damage to the workstation hardware.

The first version always gets thrown away.