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Comment Re:This triggers my WW3 theories. (Score 1) 190 190

All of a sudden the regular internet was just...slammed. The other lab was testing their regular internet connection by pinging yahoo or something and couldn't get a response. Well, massive amounts of dropped packets, anyway. Then my wife called back and said another plane hit the towers and their base was now on lockdown. Then I realized I couldn't get a response from any news website, either.

We had set up a multicast "over net" delivered via satellite to a number of smaller ISPs with Yahoo! Broadcast content. Subscribers to those ISPs were able to watch multicast streaming media news regarding 9/11.

CableLabs is now working on a "Multicast ABR" mechanism, so it is all coming back now!

Comment Re:Outside help (Score 1) 431 431

The OECD published 87 concrete recommendations for reducing administrative burdens in Greece, which are an unnecessary 3 billion Euro burden on Greek businesses annually.

Some of the OECD suggestions include things like "simplify annual leave records", "streamline start-up notifications to the Labour Inspectorate for construction sites", "establish a clear VAT registration threshold at EUR 10 000", "remove inactive VAT taxable persons from the VAT register", "simplify the periodic VAT return", "Allow full electronic submission of all notifications to Registry (company changes and annual financial statements)", "simplify financial statements of small and micro companies","Streamline payment process for all GEMH notifications to allow payments without visiting an office", etc.

Of course the OECD was not willing to say the most reasonable thing - Greece should have labor laws like the US. Fire people whenever you want, no crazy contracts, no crazy severance pay or vacations.

We know that the Hartz Reforms on labor regulations is what brought German unemployment rates down from 10% in the early part of the 2000's and is why they survived the financial crisis so well.

I concur that Greece ranks last in the Eurozone in Transparency International's corruption ratings. However I believe that corruption thrives when unclear and burdensome regulations make doing reasonable business impossible without paying someone off.

Comment Re:Outside help (Score 1) 431 431

The MESS is caused by the baby boom and Greece's liberal government funded pensions

I'd argue that this MESS is caused by the high level of labor and business regulation in Greece.

Ireland got into a big debt crisis as well, but because it has a high level of economic freedom, it was able to exit its rescue program due to economic growth (despite "austerity").

Spain has just begun to reform its labor and business regulations, and it is finally showing some return to economic growth

Germany had the Hartz labor Reforms before the economic crisis, so it never needed a rescue.

Greece remains last in the Eurozone in economic freedom rankings and highest in the Eurozone for corruption rankings.

Comment Gaps between Public and Economists (Score 1) 278 278

Indeed, there also is a large gap between the viewpoint of the public and economists.

For example, few economists (11%) agree with the statement "'Buy American' has a positive impact on manufacturing employment", whereas 75% of the public feel that way.

94% of economists feel that NAFTA was a good idea, only 46% of the public agree.

Comment Re:More than $100 (Score 4, Interesting) 515 515

I marvel at the idiocy of our citizens, it's not the government's fault, in not having insisted on keeping and improving rail since the 40's.

Actually the US has the world's best rail system. But that system is for freight, not for passengers. You can't have HSR and freight on the same tracks, so the US railways chose freight.

Comment Data point (Score 1) 515 515

LAX to SJC via air: $330 roundtrip, $165 one way
~90 minutes in the air each way, ~30 minutes boarding, ~30 minutes TSA (but you generally give ~60 minutes in case of emergency).

So 3 hours each way by air (the Uber/Taxi at the end would be about the same for the train).

Comment NRAO shields its microwave oven (Score 1) 227 227

This article claims that the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, WV, has the "cafeteria's microwave oven is kept in a shielded cage" and "Large chambers designed to absorb radio waves - including a 5,000-square-foot conference room - have been built to make sure that, as Sizemore tells it, "radiation generated in the building stays in the building."

I visited NRAO once and got to drive a diesel '69 Checker cab (no spark plugs).

Comment Re:Lack of understanding of capitalism (Score 1) 634 634

. Working to provide access to clean water leads to healthier people with a little more free time to think about starting a business or overthrowing a dictator.

I don't see any evidence that aid-based efforts have ever been effective at enhancing levels of economic freedom in developing countries.

The great successes of Asian Tigers, China, and Chile do not seem to line up with aid-based efforts. In fact these all depended on new dictators coming to power, with perfection only after a peaceful transition to democracy (China is still working on it).

Comment Lack of understanding of capitalism (Score 1) 634 634

I believe that this is a lack of understanding of the global benefits of free market capitalism among students.

While all of these "engineers without borders" and "development engineering" things are nice, they are pretty insignificant in terms of actually enhancing the wealth and well-being of poor people in developing countries versus good old capitalism - where those poor people have the opportunities to make things and perform services of value to other people.

Deng opening up China to the global market has brought hundreds of millions of Chinese out of absolute poverty (making under $1 per day) through market exchanges. China did not have large amounts of foreign aid. They just made it OK to carry on capitalist trade.

Instead of setting up Wi-Fi in a poor village, it would be far better to teach the local people about the importance of secure property rights, the needs to reduce regulation to reasonable levels for a poor country which both enhances commerce and reduces the level of corruption, the needs to allow for free trade for imports and exports. And hopefully they can change their democratic government to enhance economic freedom, and if their government is not democratic, other solutions may be required.

If you want to know why a country is still poor, go read its entry in the Index of Economic Freedom.

Comment Re:If it's up to the U.S. and their allies, never. (Score 1) 494 494

How does your "personal belief" explain the millionaire Osama bin Laden, the computer programmer "Jihadi John", the hijackers with Ph.D.s who flew jets into the World Trade Center, the millions upon millions of dollars funneled into building rockets and tunnels in Gaza, etc. ?

It is true that many terrorists are highly educated by the socialist college systems, but unable to be employed because of the lack of industry in the socialist Arab countries.

But you also allude to the large amount of government money spent on AQ/ISIS by Arab socialist governments and of course Hamas by Iran.

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