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Submission + - Ask Slashdot: What Was The Hardest Computer Game Of All Time? (

TheSwift writes: Slate ran an article yesterday about Robot Odyssey: "The Hardest Computer Game of All Time." The author gives a pretty good defense for it's hallmark difficulty, but I wanted the slashdot community's opinion.

What was the hardest computer game of all time?

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Can Lawmakers Disagree With Their Constituents?

TheSwift writes: A close friend of mine is involved in state legislature and I've interacted with him several times, hearing his viewpoints on different issues and topics. Although I found his perspectives very insightful, I have a hunch that his views on particular topics differ from the majority of his constituents. So, I wanted to bring this question to the Slashdot community for discussion: can a lawmaker disagree with the majority of their constituents if they feel they know better, or are they compelled to vote as they believe the majority of their constituents would vote?

Submission + - Fascinating physics - Trapped in an Underwater Air Bubble for Three Days (

An anonymous reader writes: Simply amazing. From Slate: "Being buried alive is usually near the top of any worst-ways-to-die list. But how about being buried alive 100 feet below the ocean surface in a tiny pocket of air? For Harrison Okene, ... this nightmare scenario became a reality for nearly three grueling days. ... May 26 at about 4:30 a.m., when Okene got up to use the restroom. His ... tugboat ... swayed in the choppy Atlantic waters ... What caused the tugboat to capsize remains a mystery, ... Okene was thrown from the crew restroom as the ship turned over. Water streamed in and swept him through the vessel’s bowels until he found himself in the toilet of an officer’s cabin. ... For the next 60 hours, Okene—who was without food, water, or light—listened to the sounds of ocean creatures scavenging through the ship on his dead crewmates... When Maxim Umansky, a physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, read about Okene’s miraculous rescue, his interest was piqued. “For a physics question, it’s an interesting problem,” said Umansky. “Of course, I’m also glad the man survived and happy with the ending of his story.” Umansky began conducting his own calculations to quantify the factors responsible for Okene’s survival. He also posed a question to a physics Web forum: How large does a bubble have to be to sustain a person with breathable air? "

Submission + - 90% of Game Hacks and Cracks Contain Malware

An anonymous reader writes: Computer and online gaming is big business for companies creating the games, but a considerable drain on the finances of gamers, so it should not come as a surprise that many of the latter decide against buying games and add-ons, choosing instead to download cracked games, keygens, patches and more from torrent or file-sharing sites. But, according to AVG, that decision could cost them much more in the long run, as the company's recent research proved that over 90 percent of "hacks and cracks" found via metasearch services such as FilesTube and FileCrop contained malicious code or malware.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Emergent complexity for a Physician 1

Dirac_my_friend writes: I'm studying as a Theoretical Physician and I'm very close to start working on the thesis. I'm fascinated by emergent complexity, such as: the Conway's game of life, bees organization, neural network, complexity economics . I'm asking you either where to read something interesting about or some cool topics you consider useful for a future job/interesting to work on. Any ideas?

Submission + - Robots, Apparently, Are Botching Surgeries All Over the Place ( 1

pigrabbitbear writes: ""We are committed to helping victims of robot surgery receive the medical care and compensation they deserve As both a lawyer and a licensed medical doctor, Dr. Francois Blaudeau has made it his mission to fight for the victims of traumatic complications as a result of botched robot surgery."

That's the opening salve from the medical malpractice lawyers who run the slick fear factory of a website, According to the doctor-lawyers behind it—doctor-lawyers like Francois Blaudeau, MD, JD, FACHE, FCLM—“thousands of people have suffered severe and critical complications at the hands of surgical robots.” In fact, “robotic surgery has been linked to many serious injuries and severe complications, including death.”"


Submission + - 3D Printing vs. 3D Drawing (

TheSwift writes: The 3Doodler may be an answer for hobbyists who hope to join the 3D printing craze, but fear spending exorbitant amounts on complicated equipment. A measly $75 is the cost of one of these simple little devices that allows you to draw in 3D. Compared to the $500-$3000 price range of many of industrial 3D printers, it may be quite a catch for budget-conscious hobbyists.

On the downside, it lacks the to-the-micron precision of the advanced software that powers most 3D printers. Most people probably won't be designing the green, life-like Yoda heads that seems a standard for any printer. You probably won't "draw" any moving parts either.

The clothes have no emperor. -- C.A.R. Hoare, commenting on ADA.