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Comment: Re:Air resistance. (Score 2) 1184

by TheRealFixer (#41156567) Attached to: White House Finalizes 54.5 MPG Fuel Efficiency Standard
Some of the new Fords, namely the Focus and Fiesta (which are actually Euro models finally being manufactured and sold in the US) come standard with dual-clutch auto-shifting 6-speed manual transmissions, similar to the kinds you find on higher-end European sports cars. They're actually rated for higher MPGs than their manual counterparts. So, there is some progress being made at getting away from torque-converter transmissions at least.
PC Games (Games)

Star Trek Online Going Free-To-Play In January 77

Posted by Soulskill
from the you-mean-you-don't-get-paid dept.
tekgoblin writes "Cryptic Studios, the developer of the Star Trek Online MMO, announced that they are switching to a Free-to-Play model on January 17th. Free subscribers to the game will be able to play, but will not get the same benefits as paying subscribers still get. Free accounts will be Silver, while paid accounts will be called Gold. Silver accounts will be able to pay for features that Gold members will get as part of their paid subscription. These features include but are not limited to respecs and extra character slots." EverQuest II is jumping on the free-to-play bandwagon as well.

Comment: Re:I agree. (Score 5, Insightful) 325

by TheRealFixer (#37843620) Attached to: Netflix Loses 800,000 Subscribers After Qwikster Gaffe
They really should have taken a page from Apple. When the music labels tried to strong-arm iTunes pricing in the early days, Apple just laughed at them and said "No. You'll take what we give you, and you'll like it." They could do this, because the iPod, and thus iTunes, was by far the most wildly popular digital music platform in the world, and they knew they had all the bargaining leverage against the labels that they needed

Netflix is in the same boat. They are far and away the biggest streaming platform around, wildly popular, and almost ubiquitous at this point. At least in North America. Who can compete with them? Blockbuster? Their platform is a joke. Hulu? Nextflix is (was) not much more per month, and Hulu still forces ads on you and has asinine and frustrating device playback restrictions on certain content, mainly because they're run by the media companies. Netflix should have all the muscle needed to force their way around the studios.

What they lack, is a strong personality like Steve Jobs in their leadership, who had no issues playing hardball with anyone, anytime.

Comment: Re:They're a business (Score 1) 291

by TheRealFixer (#36152704) Attached to: Microsoft To Support CentOS Linux In Hyper-V
I don't think quite you get the point. Mid-size businesses generally have progressed beyond the limitations of the free ESXi and vSphere Essentials level (which is a good fit for smaller businesses), but don't have needs that require vSphere Enterprise (which, realistically, Microsoft has nothing that can compare to). At that mid-level point, Hyper-V's pricing is very attractive compared to VMware, which is still fairly expensive, even with the Standard package. And when you're already an all-Windows shop, it's an easy jump to make.

It's still a bad decision, because if you grow, you're going to be stuck with the fairly limited Hyper-V and have a more difficult migration path into VMware when you're ready to join the big-boy world. But it's still a tempting deal.

Comment: Re:They're a business (Score 1) 291

by TheRealFixer (#36145334) Attached to: Microsoft To Support CentOS Linux In Hyper-V

That may be true, but how many shops do you know of that actually use HyperV? VMware dominates, Xen a ways behind, and Linux KVM and VirtualBox back aways. I don't think anyone actually runs VMs under Windows, it's rather the other way around.

Microsoft has been making some inroads with Hyper-V with mid-size businesses that are already 100% Windows environments - especially ones that haven't quite started down the virtualization path. Their licensing is attractive to these smaller companies, compared to VMware (at least the higher-end vSphere offerings). And it's Microsoft, which they're already comfortable with.

VMware destroys Hyper-V in just about every possible way at the enterprise level, but mid-size companies often don't need all the bells and whistles that vSphere offers, even as cool as they are.

"Show business is just like high school, except you get paid." - Martin Mull

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