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Comment: Re: In a Self-Driving Future--- (Score 1) 370

by TheRaven64 (#48448139) Attached to: In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars
That's fine. We'll just make sure that, unless you drive it entirely on roads that you own, you're liable for every accident that you're involved in that would have been avoided if you'd had sub-millisecond reaction time, including ones where your car isn't part of a collision but impacts the fuel economy of nearby drivers or causes others to collide having determined that avoiding you will have a lower probability of a fatality. Oh, and we will insist that you have insurance that's willing to cover all of these costs before you're allowed on the public roads.

Comment: Re:In a Self-Driving Future--- (Score 1) 370

by TheRaven64 (#48448127) Attached to: In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars

I'm sure I'll have to do something major to it eventually, but for the last decade or so, it's cost me less than 100 dollars a year

I think the USA is pretty unique in that regard. Here, if you intended to drive it on the roads, you'd need it to be taxed and insured (third-party, at least), which would make the cost per year far more than $100.

Comment: Re:In a Self-Driving Future--- (Score 1) 370

by TheRaven64 (#48447727) Attached to: In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars

The people who think that self-driving cars and not owning cars are a good idea tend to be people who live in dense urban areas and know little to nothing about the rest of the world.

I grew up in the countryside and now live in a small city where I can cycle verywhere, so I've seen both sides of this. The problem with this argument is that you forget how population density works. The people who live deep in the countryside are basically noise, statistically speaking. If a solution works for everyone else, then no one cares if they're going to keep needing private cars - it's just one more expense to counter their very low property prices.

Like it or not, any self-driving highway is going to have to make accommodations for human guided vehicles.

Or some people are going to have to flip their switch from manual to automatic when they get near populated areas.

In addition, I somehow don't think that police, fire, ambulance, politicians, etc. would be willing to use self-driving cars

Politicians already have other people drive them. Ambulances and fire engines would be a lot safer if they plugged into a control system that made other cars get out of their way, rather than relying on humans to react sensibly to a siren in the distance. Police would almost certainly want a non-networked version with a manual override, as they are very likely to have an active adversary.

Comment: Re:In a Self-Driving Future--- (Score 1) 370

by TheRaven64 (#48447703) Attached to: In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars
Before the anti-terrorism rules required them to be locked, I asked if I could see the cockpit on a flight I was taking (1998ish, I think). While I was there, the pilot received a radio message telling him to turn onto a new heading. He acknowledged, then adjusted a dial to the new heading. The plane then gently rolled, turned, and levelled out. About the only things that the pilots actually do on a modern airliner are take off and land in adverse conditions (in normal conditions the computer does it) and relay messages from ATC to the computer.

Comment: Re:In a Self-Driving Future--- (Score 1) 370

by TheRaven64 (#48447689) Attached to: In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars
I'm not sure if ZipCar works differently in the US to the UK, but here it has the slightly annoying requirements that you have to return the vehicle to the place you collected it from. That means that it's very expensive if you want to take it for a trip to another town (you can't leave it in a bay there for someone else to use while you're away and then pick either it or a different one up for the return trip a few hours / days later).

Comment: Re: writer doesn't get jeopardy, or much of anythi (Score 1) 236

Already, computers are waaay more powerful than human minds, we just haven't figured out how to steer all this power towards actual intelligence

In terms of number of switches, not really (we're getting close though). In terms of interconnect, you're orders of magnitude off. The big difference between a brain and a microprocessor is the number of interconnects between discrete components. Neurons in a human brain have as many as 7,000 connections to other neurons. The state of the art for hardware neural network simulations have 700. And don't expect that to scale linearly - doubling the number of connections is really hard. Latency goes up dramatically.

Comment: Re:wont last (Score 1) 269

The main reason for doing it with mattresses is that it lets brick and mortar stores compete with online and makes price comparisons hard. I looked at some mattresses in a shop, where I could try lying on them, and then tried to check the price online and see if the local store was competitive (I'd accept some premium for being able to try it, but not an extra 100% markup). Not only could I not find the same model online, I couldn't find it in other brick and mortar stores either. I've no idea whether the two that were priced differently were the same, or just nearly the same.

Comment: Re:"Acceptable"? WTF? (Score 1) 543

by TheRaven64 (#48427693) Attached to: "Barbie: I Can Be a Computer Engineer" Pulled From Amazon
The first amendment says that the government can't stop you from saying things they don't like. Free speech in general says that someone in a position of power can't stop you from saying things that they don't like. No matter how much free speech you have, the rest of society is still free to think you're an idiot when you open your mouth...

Comment: Re:So close, so far (Score 0) 543

by TheRaven64 (#48427595) Attached to: "Barbie: I Can Be a Computer Engineer" Pulled From Amazon

so does the modern feminism coming from the left

Most of the explanations of what 'modern feminism' is that I've seen have come from its detractors. Actual modern feminists seem pretty rare and, when you do meet them, far more rational than either their detractors or their portrayal by their detractors.

If the code and the comments disagree, then both are probably wrong. -- Norm Schryer

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