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Comment: Re:Without cheque deposit, you can bank in a brows (Score 1) 239

by TheRaven64 (#49504087) Attached to: Google Responds To EU Antitrust Claims In Android Blog Post
Hmm, this sounds like a US bank thing (cheques are pretty much gone this side of the pond). The main feature of the app is that it can be the second factor in two-factor authentication for the web-based banking, so you don't have to carry around the chip reader device. It's also a bit more convenient for quickly paying someone that you've paid before or checking your balance on the go.

Comment: Re:Late to the market....need to be special (Score 3, Interesting) 123

by TheRaven64 (#49491963) Attached to: AMD Withdraws From High-Density Server Business
Xeons aren't really the competitors for those, they're replacements for Cavium's existing MIPS64 offerings that end up in filer and network appliances. Apparently (according to a somewhat biased source at Cavium) they're competitive with current Xeons in aggregate performance per Watt, doing better on parallel workloads but less well on single-threaded ones. They really shine on anything I/O-intensive though, due to the integration of the ethernet and SATA controllers on the die (and the design of the DMA engines). They're not likely to be in general-purpose servers, but companies in the same markets as NetApp and Juniper are very interested in them (hence Cavium's investment in getting FreeBSD supported on them).

Comment: Re:Late to the market....need to be special (Score 2) 123

by TheRaven64 (#49491931) Attached to: AMD Withdraws From High-Density Server Business

8 core 64 bit ARM chips with GPU built in are fairly common and 10 core chips already announced (Mediatek), with 16-48 core vaguely hinted at for servers by other vendors

A bit more than hinting: Cavium is selling 24-48 core ThunderX (ARMv8) chips. I think the first one shipped a month or two ago.

Comment: Re:there's a strange bias on slashdot (Score 1) 191

by TheRaven64 (#49491783) Attached to: Microsoft's Role As Accuser In the Antitrust Suit Against Google
I switched to DuckDuckGo a while ago. I periodically check Bing and Google (adding !bing or !google to the DDG search line will send you to either) if I don't find results that I want. On one occasion in the last year, I've found a useful result on Bing that I didn't get with DDG or Google. The last time I had anything useful from Google was about 18 months ago. Note that Google and Bing may be fine for most searches - I only try either if I don't quickly find what I'm looking for on DDG. I had one fairly obscure search a couple of days ago (FPGA synthesis problem) where DDG only returned six results (one of which was helpful), so I tried the others to see if there was something more useful. Google gave 10 completely irrelevant results (pages that didn't even include my search term), Bing returned no results at all.

Comment: Re:there's a strange bias on slashdot (Score 2) 191

by TheRaven64 (#49491767) Attached to: Microsoft's Role As Accuser In the Antitrust Suit Against Google
The EU also fines more EU companies than US ones, but those tend not to make the news in the US either. Actually, most of them don't make the news anywhere, it's only when it's a household name that it is considered newsworthy at all, and when it's a household name that's considered American then it becomes more newsworthy in the US press because they can run with the tired old 'EU picking on US companies and jealous of their success' narrative rather than bothering with any real journalism.

Comment: Re:I'd Like To See Electronic Voting Work (Score 1) 104

by TheRaven64 (#49485871) Attached to: The Voting Machine Anyone Can Hack

There have been allegations in the UK of voter intimidation after postal ballots became easy to obtain: people would require dependents to hand over their ballots, fill them all in, and post them back. Now, it may be that this didn't happen or wasn't statistically significant, but if people are not required to turn up and vote in such a way that they can't prove to someone else how they voted then there's the potential for doing this on a large scale.

Of course one solution would be to allow individuals to vote repeatedly but only count their last vote, though if you capture someone else's voting credentials then it's very easy to vote en mass with everyone's details at one second to the closing deadline...

Comment: Re:Android without Google (Score 1) 239

by TheRaven64 (#49485685) Attached to: Google Responds To EU Antitrust Claims In Android Blog Post
Mobile phones that run Android make up the majority of new mobile phones sold. Mobile phones that run Android and don't have the Play Store installed are such a tiny fraction that they're effectively a rounding error. If your microbrewery provides beer for 70% of all restaurants and enforces a contract that, if you want to stock their beer, you can't sell any other beer and must also sell their line of soft drinks then (first, it's not really very micro, and second) I'd expect it to come under antitrust scrutiny.

"Oh what wouldn't I give to be spat at in the face..." -- a prisoner in "Life of Brian"

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