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Comment: Re:So a non-denial denial (Score 1) 164

by ThePhilips (#47641059) Attached to: F-Secure: Xiaomi Smartphones Do Secretly Steal Your Data

Mi Cloud is turned off, [...]

Oops! (Though I'm still doubtful, frankly.)

Your Android handset certainly does not do this,

Well, actually, it does. Because Android to be useable requires Google account. And when you create a Google account, Google conveniently activate the "Sync", IOW, sending your contacts, appointments, messages, etc - for archive purposed - to the Google servers.

and not without permission and it is *not* acceptable.

Buried in the EULA is not the same as giving an explicit permission. Having a crippled brick instead of the phone serves is a good incentive to "give the permission" to be spied on.

As others have said: do not put any sensitive information on the phone. IMO, with the current business around private information, masquerading as the "social" networking, I wouldn't even put the encrypted files on the smartphones.

Comment: Re:So a non-denial denial (Score 1, Insightful) 164

by ThePhilips (#47640889) Attached to: F-Secure: Xiaomi Smartphones Do Secretly Steal Your Data

"We saw that on startup, the phone sent the telco name to the server api.account.xiaomi.com. It also sent IMEI and phone number to the same server," F-Secure said.

When my Android phone starts, I'm pretty sure it sends the same shit to api.account.google.com or some such. And probably to api.account.samsung.com. Because I have Google and Samsung accounts and I'm logged in by default.

Has the F-Secure tried to, as article mentions, disable the Mi Cloud account? Probably not. Because it wouldn't have been in the news then.

When news comes from "security" consultancies, I frankly often side with the manufacturers. The ensuing hype only promotes the "consultancies" - and does nothing positive for the manufacturers. Why would they (manufacturers) add something to the phone to help promote the "consultancies"?!

Comment: Re:The canonical best household router is (Score 1) 427

by ThePhilips (#47636363) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Life Beyond the WRT54G Series?

When asking around for my WRT54G, not once I got advise that the only router matching the stability is the Apple AirPort.

Then you need to change the people you are asking or at least enlarge it to people beyond those who's biggest joy is hacking access points.

I had to exclude this category of people, because to many of them router reboots is a daily routine.

Just like that I had almost purchased the brand new Asus AC66U(?). A person on forums praised every feature, general performance and stability. But in later comments just casually dropped that if you use wi-fi for longer than two hours continuously, wireless dies and router autoreboots. But that's totally OK, because he uses it for movie streaming and a rare movie is two hours long! Bonus: the router is freshly started!! (No, I'm not making it up.)

When all is equal, I'd rather pick the device that Just Works(tm) than the one I can tweak to no end, but it fails periodically.

Comment: Re:DD-WRT's information (Score 1) 427

by ThePhilips (#47634149) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Life Beyond the WRT54G Series?

That's only half of it. And lesser at that.

WRT54G is well known for its stability and reliability.

I bet half of the routers on the "supported devices" lists wouldn't even manage the wi-fi ping test: simply ping the router for several hours. The junk hardware would overheat and reboot. The "better" would only reset the wireless, killing other connections in the process.

Only few devices actually manage to survive pretty normal traffic pattern of power users: whole day of streaming movies and music over wireless plus some P2P traffic over wired, some of it potentially wrapped up in some VPN. The quest is to find the devices, which are (1) proven to work and (2) still sold.

Comment: Re:The canonical best household router is (Score 1) 427

by ThePhilips (#47634061) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Life Beyond the WRT54G Series?

Doesn't sound like it.

When asking around for my WRT54G, not once I got advise that the only router matching the stability is the Apple AirPort. They are more expensive, comparatively limited in function - but whatever traffic you throw at it, however long, just like the WRT54G, it simply handles it without outages.

I was also looking at the Asus RT-N66 series, the second top rated advise I got, but they still have stability problems if you overload them. And not all devices/revisions are compatible to tomato/open-wrt/etc too.

Otherwise, most routers are still suspect to the overhead + auto-reboot cycles. Not mentions the long-term Wi-Fi transfer problems. Pretty sad state of the affairs, really.

Comment: Re: You're welcome to them. (Score 1) 402

by ThePhilips (#47601037) Attached to: Comparison: Linux Text Editors

This is probably the most unjustified complain you throw. The tags support in VIM is very good - if you bothered to RTFM. Literally every book and tutorial describe these highly sophisticated and inexplicable 3 steps involved: install the exuberant ctags, put into the .vimrc the line ":set tags=tags;/", and finally run "ctags -R ." in the root of the project.

Problem is not VIM, it is the ctags. Ctags just doesn't work - good enough for me. I have used it, and it just goes berserk with #defines, files which are not .h or .c (xml rules or binary blobs, etc.).

Yes. But this is more of the problem with the programming language itself. Or better: practices, the project uses.

For example, in my current project, ctags and Eclipse both do excellent job of indexing the 100% C code base. Because there are actually strict guidelines relating the preprocessor and code formatting. In my previous project, a C++ one, the hacks had used macro definition (and redefinitions) not only for the class names, but also for the namespaces, including the "using" clause. No indexer could ever parse it and some classes and functions were never visible in the index.

In the end, I found that for as long as I can read and understand the code on first look, so can the indexer. If one writes a quirky hairy mess, then indexer probably is not even the biggest issue.

Comment: Re: You're welcome to them. (Score 3, Informative) 402

by ThePhilips (#47587879) Attached to: Comparison: Linux Text Editors

The problem with Vim (and Emacs) is that they do not support anything modern, not even ctrl-z/x/c/v.

VIM has the "VIM Easy" mode, which when used on MSWindows would do Ctrl-Z/X/C/V out of box. And even select text when holding Shift and moving around with cursor keys.

Shortcut to VIM Easy is preinstalled. If you complain about it, then you probably never really used the VIM. Or are you complaining about the *NIX "vi"?

For programming Eclipse or NetBeans or Visual Studio is just miles away what of vi/emacs can do, especially out of the box.

The problem for the professionals is not what the IDE can do out of box, but what can it be made to do. Eclipse or NetBeans or Visual Studio - all suck horribly at everything for what there is no button premade. And when there is a button for everything - they suck at finding this right button.

But I'm not planning to contest the point that VIM is not IDE. No, it is not "VIM is bad IDE" - it is "VIM is not IDE". (This is different for Emacs, though: it is an IDE and then some more. One needs to learn it. And lack of good in-depth tutorials is actually what turned me off from the Emacs.)

The thing about VIM is that it integrates nicely with the system, instead of reinventing it. And it also provides great automation facilities with macros, mappings or scripts. They are fairly simple and can be learned in 1-2 weeks, which is a small price to pay for the ability to control 100% of your text editor. That is the capability no other editor offers.

To get vi/emacs to work nearly as good as good IDE is just too big a job.

(Please do not say "vi" when you really mean "VIM".)

In the project Neovim the work going on to make the Lua the built-in scripting language and improve VIM's plug-in framework. All that to specifically allow to create IDE based the VIM. (Though in my opinion, the direction of the Neovim effort is misguided. They should have went in direction of allowing VIM to be easily embeddable into other applications.)

So in the future, there might be an IDE based on VIM. But not right now.

For example NetBeans ctrl-b (go to declaration). Sure, you can install ctags, configure it, run it, tinker with it, tinker some more, add custom rules, search net, rinse-and-repeat and eventually you'll get something resembling ctrl-b, but not quite the same.

This is probably the most unjustified complain you throw. The tags support in VIM is very good - if you bothered to RTFM. Literally every book and tutorial describe these highly sophisticated and inexplicable 3 steps involved: install the exuberant ctags, put into the .vimrc the line ":set tags=tags;/", and finally run "ctags -R ." in the root of the project.

If you use plugins like YouCompleteMe, they would do it for you automagically.

In the end, if you can't bother to read the VIM's help (which is by far the best help for a text editor there is out there) then VIM is definitely not for you.

Comment: Interactivity? (Score 1) 402

by ThePhilips (#47587819) Attached to: Comparison: Linux Text Editors

They should have tested interactivity of the editors. Though in synthetic test environment that would have been probably an impossible task.

I'm still using the VIM (terminal version, occasionally the GUI gvim-athena) because this is the only combination which doesn't have the delays.

Few years back I have tried the Kate/Kdevelop, Gedit and Eclipse, and they still had the same thing in common: occasionally GUI would freeze for couple hundred milliseconds, typed text at first goes nowhere and then suddenly pops in the editor window.(*)

It's probably not a big deal for a mouse person. But for a keyboard person (or a touch-typist), when there is no visible indication of something happening, the delays are simply too irritating.

VIM (in xterm) still remain my champion of text editing. Yes, xterm, because the "modern" terminals, especially with tabs open, not only prone to the same GUI delays, but they also prone to losing the focus (like in: you switch back to the terminal, start typing but nothing happens, click with the mouse inside the terminal window and start typing again - and lo and behold it finally works).

(*) Disabling the "composing" window managers helps greatly, but doesn't eliminate the delays completely.

Comment: Re:what? (Score 1) 213

by ThePhilips (#47572893) Attached to: Vint Cerf on Why Programmers Don't Join the ACM

What the hell is ACM and why would it benefit me to join them?

If you were a halfway competent software developer, you'd already know, and if you were an elite software developer, you'd already have joined...

I'm no elite, but as a competent software developer, all I know about ACM is that they are a paywalled website.

Why would I chose to spend time investigating one particular paywalled site over the dozen others? They all look the same to me.

Most of computer science research is published publicly on Internet anyway. On several occasions, when my friends from universities were getting paywalled articles printed for me, I was finding out that I have seen the article already freely before on the internet.

Usefull/non-useful ratio on the paywalled articles IME isn't sufficiently different from the plain web search to justify the price. I still have to waste my time grepping through all the junk.

I might pay for somebody to actually select the founding and important articles. But I'm yet to hear about an organization which offers such service. (And the academia where being published still bears the highly exaggerated value, and 90% of articles are nothing but the quoting of the quoted, almost guarantees that the service wouldn't be affordable.)

Comment: Re:None of them. (Score 1) 436

by ThePhilips (#47564039) Attached to: Which Is Better, Adblock Or Adblock Plus?

How about the fact that Chrome has an up to date implementation of Flash that continues to get security updates... And don't tell me I don't need flash, you'll be just moving the goalposts with your argument.

That is somewhat ironic, since I find video quality of Google's own YouTube to be the worst with the Google's own Chrome. Either way - HTML5 or Flash - in Chrome sometimes HD videos are shown highly pixelated. Works fine - everyt time - in Fx and IE.

Anyway, FlashBlock (which can also be simulated with the AdBlock), side-steps most of the Flash-related security problems.

Comment: Lots of people... (Score 1) 544

Lots of people want physical home/back buttons.

Lots of people also want non-glossy screen.

Lots of people *need* resistive touch-screen, because capacitive ones can't be used in gloves.

But all that doesn't mean that it is going to happen. Production/etc moved to Asia - distance between customer and manufacturer is as great as it ever was.

I personally do not expect thing to get better.

Comment: Re:I, in turn, disagree (Score 1) 241

by ThePhilips (#47488895) Attached to: Math, Programming, and Language Learning

Man, I haven't even mentioned the numerical computing. It is an exception, because that's where programming serves the math, not the other way around.

In numerical computing, ironically, there is very little overlap between the math methods used in the development and math methods used for the goal of the development. Programs there often look more like a math formula. Developers simply skip the "computer science" as a whole and use the computers (with help of specialized libraries) as almost pure calculators.

As an exception, it is simply obscures the subject of the discussion.

The talk here is about what precisely from the math is used in general software development. (IOW, math serves the programming.) My personal experience, having majored in the applied math 15 years ago, is that by studying math one learns the methods to approach the real world problems. "Learns" is a weak word. The methods are implanted, grafted (or even brandmarked) onto the brain. Normal person's brain go into freeze when faced with thousands pages of specification. Person with math background, already switched into "divide and conquer" mode, and probably has already dismissed the >90% of it as trivial, incremental and derivative. (Some people learn it one their own. But studying math is definitely a nice shortcut to get there faster and earlier.) But the math in itself, either discrete/algebra or analysis or numerical, is very very rarely needed.

Man must shape his tools lest they shape him. -- Arthur R. Miller

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