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Jetman Attempts Intercontinental Flight 140

Posted by samzenpus
from the a-jetwing-and-a-prayer dept.
Last year we ran the story of Yves Rossy and his DIY jetwings. Yves spent $190,000 and countless hours building a set of jet-powered wings which he used to cross the English Channel. Rossy's next goal is to cross the Strait of Gibraltar, from Tangier in Morocco and Tarifa on the southwestern tip of Spain. From the article: "Using a four-cylinder jet pack and carbon fibre wings spanning over 8ft, he will jump out of a plane at 6,500 ft and cruise at 130 mph until he reaches the Spanish coast, when he will parachute to earth." Update 18:57 GMT: mytrip writes: "Yves Rossy took off from Tangiers but five minutes into an expected 15-minute flight he was obliged to ditch into the wind-swept waters."

Comment: Re:Wow, Opera has what I call ambition... (Score 1) 262

by TheMuon (#30210524) Attached to: Opera 10.10 Released, Includes New "Unite" Tech

I have to agree with the latter two examples but Opera is perfectly capable of the first. You disallow JS globally and enable it on individual sites.

One thing to add to the list is a better adblocking system. You can add premade block content lists with Opera to serve the same purpose as adblock but it is not entirely trivial to do.

Comment: Re:Psychonomics (Score 2, Insightful) 421

by TheMuon (#30043604) Attached to: What Computer Science Can Teach Economics

Labor

This is the resource that you are missing in your equation. Combined with time, we have a vast amount of this resource to draw on. Wealth is never created from thin air though. We may think we have large amounts of virtual wealth, like credit, but its all worthless unless its backed by real wealth. If a person doesn't have a job to pay off their debt and doesn't have the physical wealth to cover the debt, a good bit of the stated value of that debt doesn't exist.

Comment: Re:Bullshit! (Score 1) 421

by TheMuon (#30043470) Attached to: What Computer Science Can Teach Economics

That software did not come out of thin air. Yes, the copies you made were essentially free but resources were initially consumed to produce it. The value of copies of that product when access and distribution are nearly free is essentially zero. Which is why we have copyright laws to give it artificial value.

For that reason, spreading around existing software doesn't really create any new wealth using p2p since very little resources are expended. It just redistributes existing wealth. If you want to create new wealth with software you have to write new code. This takes labor.

Here's an example for you. A book has value. Resources were expended to produce it. An author wrote it. A publisher edited it, printed it and distributed it. The physical material making up the book had to be produced. Some of these costs are constant regardless of how many books are printed and thus the cost per book approaches zero. This is the actual writing and editing. The other costs like printing and distribution increase with each book such that the cost per book approaches some value greater than zero. Thus every book, no matter how many books are printed, has some significant value.

An ebook has insignificant value. The cost to produce an ebook is primarily the writing and editing, which approaches zero with every copy made. Again, copyright gives the ebook and artificial value but that value is not real since copyright can be circumvented.

Comment: Re:They have no business in knowing who viewed the (Score 1) 145

by TheMuon (#29860051) Attached to: Music Rights Holders Sue YouTube Again

By that same logic, how is a person's short term memory, let alone their long term memory, not copyright infringement? No, scratch that, how long before people start getting fined for infringing by copying a work into their short and long term memory as by the above logic it is infringement.

Comment: Re:Terrible analogy (Score 1) 173

by TheMuon (#29852525) Attached to: Are Game Publishers a Necessary Evil, Or Just Necessary?

Mortal Online

Its still in beta so its future success is yet to be determined but considering you have to pre-order the game to get access to the beta and that over 10k people have done so, tells me the game is at least on the right track at the moment.

I can't really say anything about my personal beta experience, they have an NDA, but overall it is definitely a good game. Its whether that will translate into success or not that is still uncertain.

Comment: Re:do you mean mandarin or cantonese? (Score 1) 272

by TheMuon (#29843181) Attached to: EU Paves the Way For Three-Strikes Cut-Off Policy

English is a bastard language We native English speakers will gladly steal any word you folks come up with, butcher its spelling and pronunciation, and use it as our own. Hell, Shakespeare, the paragon of English writing, invented, altered, and borrowed a large number of words and forever altered the English language. So you may jeer about how you are going to corrupt our language but I tell you now, you cannot corrupt what is already corrupted.

PS The reason many native English speakers have trouble with English spelling is because it doesn't make much sense phonetically. We learn to speak the language before we even begin to learn to write it so in our mind there isn't much difference between "there", "they're" and "their" when we are first learning the language. Or at least that is the reasoning I was given by my German professor.

Comment: Re:If it makes you feel better (Score 3, Interesting) 198

by TheMuon (#29206841) Attached to: Proposed UK File-Sharing Laws May Be Illegal, ISPs Upset

After the bit about the post office I strongly suspected sarcasm. After the second line about the bus-lines I was certain this was sarcasm. By the time I got to "Woosh hammer" I thought this was such well written sarcasm making such a good point that your average sixth grader would fully comprehend this comment.

After reading the comments I realize I've either severely overestimated the reading comprehension of your average sixth grader or severely underestimated the reading comprehension of your average slashdot reader.

PS, that "or" is inclusive.

Comment: Re:Yup (Score 1) 140

What games is this true for? I play PC games exclusively and I cannot recall ever having to do such a thing.

I think you are referring to CD keys. There is no online activation. Its a check before installing to determine if you have a valid serial key to go along with the disc. If it is a game with multiplayer this acts as a fairly effective anti piracy mechanism since they can detect if 2 people with the same CD key are trying to access the multiplayer through their servers at the same time. If you are playing single player or multiplayer via LAN or unofficial servers then it does nothing to stop piracy.

The reason you can't resell PC games is because there is nothing to guarentee that you've uninstalled the game from your PC or that you haven't made a copy. Unlike with consoles, not having the disc is no hinderence for a PC gamer to still play the game.

Comment: Re:Science/tech illiteracy (Score 1) 512

by TheMuon (#28468747) Attached to: Beamed Space Solar Power Plant To Open In 2016?

To be fair, almost your entire statement is BS. All heat engines that we use add heat to the Earth, not near enough to matter but they do. If you burn coal you unlock chemical energy, same with natural gas. If you use nuclear energy you are using energy stored in the nuclei of uranium atoms. Energy that was not available to warm up the Earth before. But as I said, its all of no significance compared to the energy we get from the Sun.

MS-DOS must die!

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