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Comment: Re:NSA probably already has this technology (Score 1) 119

by TheMeuge (#47897473) Attached to: The Challenges and Threats of Automated Lip Reading

You are making a fundamentally flawed assumption that the government cares about false positives. I think our no-fly lists, jails, and police militarization are a pretty good indicator that a low false positive rate does not figure into calculations as far as the NSA, TSA, DHS or other TLAs are concerned. A cynical man (or woman) may also wonder about whether true positive rate figures into their calculations at all as well, or whether a power grab is the sole purpose of these agenices.

Comment: Re:Open Many Doors (Score 5, Insightful) 35

by TheMeuge (#47839139) Attached to: Shadowy Tech Brokers Deliver Data To the NSA

It is impossible to enforce the laws when you can catch all the violations

You're asking the wrong question - the correct question is this - how have we wound up in a situation where he have so many offenders, of so many laws, that there's not enough resources to lock them all up even if we knew every last one of them.
The answer is simple - if you create a job which comes with money and power, and where the job description is writing laws - you are going to have more laws. It's inevitable. And in a society where as a lawmaker you are rewarded for being "tough on crime", each subsequent law will be nitpickier and more punishing than the last.
That's it - our own system is going to bury us all in petty crime.
Freedom is the ability to break little rules. Rule of law is when you get caught when you break the big rules. A police state is when everyone is guilty, and it's up the police to decide who gets caught at what time.

As someone who was born behind the Iron Curtain, I promise you that the latter is very very scary.

Comment: Re:You can't sell what you don't have! (Score 3, Insightful) 274

by TheMeuge (#47540193) Attached to: Verizon Now Throttling Top 'Unlimited' Subscribers On 4G LTE

This has nothing to do with their network infrastructure, and everything to do with the fact that they would like you to pay out of pocket to stream media on their network. With a 10gb monthly limit on my 4 user plan, if I go away on a trip and watch 3-4 netflix movies in HD, I've used up my entire monthly allowance, and then streaming becomes pay-per-view at $10+ per movie.

They are annoyed that they have customers who still have an "unlimited" plan, and they are effectively converting those users to having a usable 5gb plan.

Comment: Re:Meanwhile In Humans... (Score 3, Insightful) 157

by TheMeuge (#47440133) Attached to: Chimpanzee Intelligence Largely Determined By Genetics

I'll feed this troll.

...we're lead to believe with enough money for education everyone can be intelligent!

Appropriate general education ensures that we all have a chance to get to a certain level. Surely some people are more intelligent than others at baseline, but like most characteristics it needs to be exercised and developed... in the absence of education, it's easy to waste what you were born with, and that's what general education tries to prevent - the waste of intelligence. The other important role of education is to ensure that no matter what your level of education, you receive instruction sufficient to let you integrate into society.

Comment: Re:Not such a big problem (Score 1) 74

by TheMeuge (#47409425) Attached to: Blue Shield Leaks 18,000 Doctors' Social Security Numbers

Correction: Most newly graduating and practicing doctors. Established doctors make good money, the lowest average being around 150k year. I don't feel for doctors in general because they are making tons of money off the backs of sick patients. It's time to end for-profit medicine and move to a sane single-payer system. The only thing stopping this is the love of money. Things should be like the military or government, where the medical schools are run by the government and doctors graduate with no debt, but are required to give the government 10 years of service in lieu of tuition. They would get promoted based on time in grade and time in service. They would receive sane salaries like military doctors. It's beyond time to remove the incentive of money for good treatment.

Just like bakers, farmers and chefs. They make money off the backs of HUNGRY people. It's time to end for-profit food-making and move to a sane single-payer system. Things should be like the military or government, and they would receive salaries. It's beyond time to remove the incentive of money for good treatment.

See what I did there?

Comment: researcher vs surgeon (Score 4, Interesting) 56

by TheMeuge (#46799137) Attached to: Closing Surgical Incisions With a Paintbrush and Nanoparticles

I AM a physician, and yes, whoever does the demonstration takes quite a bit away from the demonstration by being pretty horrific at suturing... like 2nd year medical student who hasn't practiced bad. If they are going to compare quality of tissue approximation between sutures and their glue, they should probably use proper technique. A plastic surgeon would have laid out 10 sutures or more into the same space, probably in half the time. I am sure there's a senior surgery resident out there who wouldn't mind getting a few hundred bucks to tie a few sutures on camera.

That being said, there are some structures in the body that are very fragile, and difficult to sew. Also, the elderly and the chronically ill have tissues that just fall apart, limiting the usefulness of many surgeries in managing their illness. If we could create seams that don't rely as much on tissue strength, we could probably operate on quite a few more people.

Comment: Re:I've heard that government moves slowly... (Score 4, Interesting) 299

I once attended a seminar by one of the heads of emergency response from the city that's often portrayed as the world's biggest terrorism target. He was going on about communications equipment that is stored away for use after a low-yield nuke detonation. I asked the speaker whether the equipment and storage facilities are shielded against EMP. He asked me what "EMP" is.

I walked out.

Comment: first they came for our cell phones... (Score 2) 197

by TheMeuge (#46328195) Attached to: US Carriers Said To Have Rejected Kill Switch Technology Last Year

You don't live in that kind of a society right up until the moment when you do live in that kind of a society, at which point it is rather too late to do anything to prevent it. Trust someone who lived behind the iron curtain - you don't WANT to know what society will be like if we keep heading in that direction. However small those steps are, they are not reversible.

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