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Comment: Re:The over-65's swung it for No (Score 5, Insightful) 471

by TheMathemagician (#47945411) Attached to: Scotland Votes No To Independence
But the SNP already shifted the goalposts by allowing 16-17 year olds to vote (knowing they'd be big YES voters) even though voting age in the UK is 18. They even got the year 2014 selected as it's the 700th anniversary of Bannockburn. You rigged the game in your favour and STILL lost quite clearly, now is the time to STFU.

Comment: Re:Free Willy! (Score 4, Informative) 471

by TheMathemagician (#47945081) Attached to: Scotland Votes No To Independence
You know that jus primae noctis has been abolished, right? Scotland is already free. They are part of the free country which is the UK. They vote for members of the Parliament in London and have their own Scottish Assembly. The YES vote blew it by failing to have any plan for the currency and stubbornly insisting they could join the EU when the message from Brusells was quite clearly ... no, you can't, not for years, and not until you renounce all the special treatment the UK squeezed out.

Comment: Re:Nor Private Police (Score 1) 133

It is elected by the people. Every resident of the City has a vote. However given the fact that the number of residents is completely dwarfed by the numbers who commute in each day companies are also awarded votes depending on their number of employees. The company I work for dished these out to volunteers who appear on the Ward registers and can vote in elections. Obviously they could appoint stooges but I know one of the electors and he has never been put under any pressure to vote a particular way.

Comment: Re:Corporate Cops, eh? (Score 1) 133

It's very common in Britain for suspects to be arrested by one police force and questioned by another. Obviously cases are usually handled according to the location of the presumed crime but for something not specific to a particular location then theoretically any police force could handle it.

Comment: Re:Diplomatic immunity? (Score 1) 173

by TheMathemagician (#47359069) Attached to: Julian Assange Plans Modeling Debut At London Fashion Show
Because the Ecuadorian President decided to offer him sanctuary just to yank the US's chain. They couldn't care less about him. I see the situation developing in one three ways: (1) Assange gives himself up to the British authorities who will ship him to Sweden (2) Britain gets tired of the abuse of diplomatic privileges and tells the Ecuadorians to give him up or GTFO. At this point they could probably give Assange a diplomatic passport and take him back to Ecuador without him being arrested. (3) The Ecuadorians tire of their embassy guest and give him notice to find a new home. He could try his luck with Russia or, if he has any sense, go to Sweden. Of course Britain could just forcibly extract him any time they wanted. The SAS has a team permanently based in London and would enjoy a nice day out. However I'm sure this option has been categorically ruled out due to all the diplomatic fallout that would ensue.

"I'm a mean green mother from outer space" -- Audrey II, The Little Shop of Horrors

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