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Comment: Re:Honestly not that bad (Score 1) 646

by TheGreatOrangePeel (#41421869) Attached to: Ubuntu Will Now Have Amazon Ads Pre-Installed
While it is true that ads result in affiliate revenue, it isn't always true that affiliate revenue means that you're seeing ads. My point is that calling it "ad revenue" is likely a misnomer in this case. To me it sounds like all they're doing is placing a links to Amazon in the menu which has a GET parameter get buys them a wimpy 5% cut of whatever it is you're buying. I'll gladly click an Amazon icon; it means that I'm supporting Ubuntu with no money out-of-pocket.

Comment: Use referrals, networking (Score 1) 186

My dad was placed in a high-tech job skills program after being laid off by his previous employer. He now has his A+ and Network+ certificates. Using basic terms with him like "CAT-6e cable" he still has to ask questions like, "you mean the yellow wires?" All things fair, he still muddles through his own problems now (which is a relief to me) but I think it speaks volumes how much a certification is actually worth.

Normally, I'd advise you to use your resume to show potential employers that you've done hard stuff and use your cover letter to point out the holes you're especially good at plugging (e.g. I, personally, tend to make tools that make tedious, manual, error-prone tasks a few clicks or a single command). However, since you're doing the freelance website thing, I suggest that you ask your satisfied customers to write referrals for you that you can reference. If you have an especially good, ongoing relationship with a particular customer, offer them a discount to take phone Q and As with potential new customers. In short: Network.

Comment: Not so geeky, imo (Score 5, Insightful) 169

by TheGreatOrangePeel (#40135101) Attached to: Grilling For Geeks
Some iPhone apps and a couple of gimmicky products ... Where's the Arduino based TC4C with LCD readout to use programming and thermocouples to tell you when your food is done. Where's the PID controlled BBQ smoker from a couple of flower pots and electric stove heating element? These are just the things from the top of my head! I'm probably burning some karma with this post, but I'm very disappointed.

Comment: Re:No (Score 3, Insightful) 138

More money down the shitter. I can't think of anything a hacker would gain from a medical device.

Things like record keeping blood bank software is regarded as a medical device by the FDA. Such software can contain sensitive information like you Social Security Number or drivers license number. In Sort, a hacker can gain plenty from breaking into a medical device.

Speaking as someone who has worked in the software side of the medical industry I just want to say that this is long overdue and the FDA has their work cut out for them. The systems I worked on are laughable in their "security" as they typically rely on how secure the local intranet is. Software vendors rarely put in any kind of serious authentication methods.

Comment: Re:That's why I like the basic Kindle (Score 1) 418

by TheGreatOrangePeel (#39249423) Attached to: The eBook Backlash
I agree with parent, but have no mod points to give. Really the title on /. should read more like, "The backlash against reading eBooks on tablets" which TFA got right ("Finding Your Book Interrupted ... By the Tablet You Read It On") but the mark got missed on /. because it gets more attention this way.

Comment: Trading companies if you want a Linux world (Score 2) 506

by TheGreatOrangePeel (#38984653) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Where Are the Open Source Jobs?

First, disregard all the posts calling you a douche. If you're unhappy in your job, you're unhappy in your job. Anyone criticizing you for a 1 paragraph ask /. question that is just one piece in a much larger picture needs to have their head looked at. In my mind, you're being called a douche for staying on-topic and NOT going into detail on all the conflicts you may have had with management. I really can't express how frustrated I am with those posts and the lack of thinking that had to have happened to not only get them posted, but to get them moderated as INSIGHTFUL of all things. /rant

More on-topic, most major trading firms (at least the ones in Chicago) are heavily Linux/Unix based shops who are more interested in using tools that can get stuff implemented *now* (usually to fix an issue) than tools they have to negotiate a price on and implement in the next month or two. Obviously enough, however, this is only one side of the open-source coin. If you want to do more than just *use* open-source software and you want to be part of a company that is actively building and developing open-source tools, then I suggest you target specific companies like RedHat or specific roles in companies that own major open source tools. Most companies have job postings somewhere on their site, so if you target the right companies and sell yourself in the right way, you should be able to find a good fit.

Comment: Re:Two choices... (Score 1) 385

There are strict laws that govern the receipt, storage and sharing of personal information. To put it simply, you can't do any one of those things without first having the consent of person that you have data about. In this case it could be argued that receipt and storage was given implicitly by the return of the hard drive to the company that refurbished the drive. However, the fact that a drive, potentially fully loaded with highly personal data, made it from one customer to another is a serious issue. All of this is to say that, if Newegg refurbished the hard drive, then yes, it IS Newegg's job to wipe the drive.

Comment: Re:HP isn't exiting WebOS (Score 2) 121

by TheGreatOrangePeel (#38304192) Attached to: HP Reviving the $99 Touch Pad On December 11th
I've been speculating that they're trying to flood the market with WebOS so they can tell companies who are considering using the platform on their product product things like, "X WebOS devices are currently in use with an estimated user base of Y. Based on sales of WebOS devices from 2011, a projected increase to a user base of Z is expected by Q4 2012." Where X, Y and Z are impressive and rather inflated numbers. Similar to how their server/network hardware support makes them more money than sales of hardware itself, I would expect there to be a lot more money for them in selling and supporting the WebOS platform to 3rd parties.

The world is not octal despite DEC.

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