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Comment: Re:No more cash in the bank? (Score 2) 107

by TheGratefulNet (#47945697) Attached to: Microsoft Lays Off 2,100, Axes Silicon Valley Research

do you live here (bay area)? I do. been here several decades.

the valley does NOT want talent. what do they want? CHEAP LABOR. quality is not important, insight is not important, even code quality is not important. speed and price is all that matters.

I wish I was kidding... ;(

Comment: vpn's also get you disconnected (short term) (Score 1) 418

by TheGratefulNet (#47909105) Attached to: Comcast Allegedly Asking Customers to Stop Using Tor

I recently moved and had CC for the previous year I was in my last place. I used a vpn almost all the time and my line stayed up pretty much 100%.

this year when I moved, I transferred CC to my new place and I continue to run a vpn. I now notice, for some reason, that after a few hours, I get a loss of ping to anything. if I stop my vpn, the default router is still unpingable. what 'fixes' it is to reboot the cable modem (and my access pfsense router, which then gets a new dhcp primary addr) and then things are good again for a few hours.

not sure if this is related, but if I don't use a vpn, the line stays up for days and weeks at a time. when I use a vpn, I get a few hours at a time.

might not mean a thing, but then again, it might. I can't quite tell yet. what I am planning on doing is designing/building a reboot/test loop so that my line will stay up even if I'm not home to notice that it went down.

I had to do that kind of thing with pacbell dsl about 10+ yrs ago (their alcatel, aka crash-catel modem was at fault back then; but same thing happened - I'd lose connectivity and only a reboot of the modem would bring it back again).

its not convenient but if this keeps my line alive, sigh, well, this is what I will have to do.

Comment: Re:Magic (Score 1) 366

by TheGratefulNet (#47880905) Attached to: The State of ZFS On Linux

I ran zfs on freebsd for a few years but gave up on it. at one time, I did a cvsup (like an apt-get update, sort of, on bsd) and it updated zfs code, updated a disk format encoding but you could not revert it! if I had to boot an older version of the o/s (like, before the cvsup) the disk was not readable! that was a showstopper for me and a design style that I object to, VERY MUCH. makes support a nightmare.

I've never seen this in linux with jfs, xfs, ext*fs, even reiser (remember that?) never screwed me like this before.

the system also was very ram hungry and cpu hungry.

I'm still not convinced its good for anything but serious users who have a GOOD backup/restore plan. updating a disk image format and not allowing n-1 version of o/s to read it is a huge design mistake and I'm not sure I understand the reasoning behind it, but until that is changed, I won't run zfs.

Comment: Re:containment (Score 2) 296

by TheGratefulNet (#47868717) Attached to: WD Announces 8TB, 10TB Helium Hard Drives

obsolete?

if you use drives as shelf-spares or backups, then this is a MAJOR problem!

I have drives that are 10+ yrs old and while I don't spin them up very often, I do expect them to still work years from now as long as I give them a spin-up every so often, to keep them in shape.

a drive that fails just sitting there, unused, is NOT something I want to buy! or own.

Comment: Re:Cookie settings help (Score 1) 230

vpn. all the way.

you see that stream of octets? you can't get into them!

bwahahaha!

now, it seems that comcast (my isp) drops my vpn connection every few hours. I'm working on a modem reboot system that keeps my network up but its a huge PITA that comcast resets my connection several times a day and it requires a full modem reboot to get it back again.

still, I'll continue to use a vpn for many reasons. the 'opaque stream of octets' keeps their fingers out of my data, very nicely. they can't modify or read it in any way.

Comment: zabbix is NOT an snmp manager (Score 2) 137

by TheGratefulNet (#47841885) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Remote Server Support and Monitoring Solution?

not really. snmp is an afterthought for them and its clumsy as hell to add snmp to it. I tried and gave up. instead, I picked hobbit (uhm, the new name is 'xymon').

xymon has its quirks but it was not hard to modify to add more snmp features to and its coding was not too bad to get thru. its not written in a lot of 'strange' languages, and that's a plus, to me, too.

personally, I usually just write snmp code fresh, from scratch, using net-snmp mgr tools. its not hard and you get just what you want and you are not muddled down in lots of 'infrastructure' that someone else thought was good but useless to you (like zabbix).

Comment: Re:Great idea at the concept stage. (Score 3, Insightful) 254

by TheGratefulNet (#47831933) Attached to: UCLA, CIsco & More Launch Consortium To Replace TCP/IP

citation needed.

I disagree strongly that 'ipv4 hardware' (huh? what IS that, btw? does this imply that ipv6 is not in 'hardware'? how strange to describe things) is not up to modern network speeds. if anything, they can outrun any intermediate link in the chain from you to some random website. wan is still the slow part and always will be; but unless you truly get 1gig speeds to your door, your hardware will be more than enough for anything wan-based.

I truly have no idea where you got this info from, but you are as wrong as could be.

Comment: Re: But is it reaslistic? (Score 4, Interesting) 369

the 'culture of fear' continues on.

BE AFRAID! IF YOU FOLLOW OUR INSTRUCTIONS, YOU WILL BE SAFE!

yeah, right.

I'm tired of this scare bullshit. I worry more about my own people (the government and authorities) than I will ever worry about some foreign 'bad guy'.

when are people going to finally tire of being told to 'be afraid!' ? maybe the next generation will wise-up. (probably not, though; they are not any smarter than we are and they are falling for all the same propaganda.)

at least some of us can see thru this. not that it helps, any.

Comment: Re:Loose Lips Sinik Ships (Score 4, Informative) 248

yes. sort of.

first, there is the right to freely travel inside your country.

second, there is the implied right to earn an income. today, its getting to the point where travel via air is required by many jobs.

third, there is nothing in the C to allow denying you the right to travel.

this has never been about C stuff; but that does not stop the 'culture of fear' politicians who have found a new friend in keeping people under their control.

Comment: Re:Google seems kind of serious about this (Score 5, Insightful) 36

by TheGratefulNet (#47736443) Attached to: Google Announces a New Processor For Project Ara

google is only serious about ad revenue. all else are 'toys' to their management and the management and their employees have the shortest attention span of any large company I've ever known. they EOL things in such a short time, the trust level is now zero, with them.

hardware? google? they can't even keep software (that used to be flagship grade) working with patches and updates. they just plain lose interest and move on to other things.

at this point, google is a lot of talk but they can't be trusted to support things long-term and that, to me, kills any interest in tech things they show us.

Comment: Re:Working from home (Score 3, Informative) 161

by TheGratefulNet (#47719581) Attached to: Calif. Court Rules Businesses Must Reimburse Cell Phone Bills

they used to.

when I started at cisco, back in the early 90's, they bought us a 14.4 modem, ncd x-terminal and a 2nd phone line. later, when I was at sgi, they run us a company paid isdn line. juniper also gave us isdn lines, iirc.

the big companies used to do this for us (all in calif., fwiw). now, they seem to assume 'you need inet and a phone, anyway' so they want to avoid paying, but I have always had to give my cell # to my workers and I do get work calls on my personal line. would be nice to have them just buy me a phone and fully cover it, at this point (my last job was android based devel and so, yes, we got a company phone and data plan all paid).

Comment: Re:I have a better idea (Score 1) 207

the nsa has nothing to do with this spying stuff. CALEA is at fault and that was put in place decades ago, and forces ALL us companies to install backdoors for, cough, 'law enforcement' use.

its not cisco and its not nsa. in this case, at least.

blame the law enforcement lobby. they keep complaining they don't have enough power or tools, and congress is always afraid to be called 'soft on crime'. that fully explains that.

Numeric stability is probably not all that important when you're guessing.

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