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Microsoft

+ - Expensify CEO: Why we won't hire .NET developers->

Submitted by TheGrapeApe
TheGrapeApe (833505) writes "The CEO of San Fransisco-based VC-backed startup Expensify wrote a post on the company's blog today about why he considers .NET experience on a resume a general liability and that it will "definitely raise questions" when screening for developers in his shop:

NET is a dandy language. It’s modern, it’s fancy, it’s got all the bells and whistles. And if you’re doing Windows Mobile 7 apps (which the stats suggest you aren’t), it’s your only choice. But choosing .NET is a choice, and whenever anybody does it, I can’t help but ask “why?”

Does he have a point? Or is it counterproductive to screen devs out based on what platforms or languages they have used in the past? Discuss."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Fine with me... (Score 4, Insightful) 775

by TheGrapeApe (#32818910) Attached to: Microsoft Out of Favor With Young, Hip Developers
I am a young(er? 29) developer and I do most of my development on the .NET stack. No, it's not as "cool" as being an iPhone dev, but at least Ballmer doesn't tell me I can't compile my code without forking him $100/yr...and he doesn't take 30% percent of whatever I might make selling my code.

I work in a mixed shop where most of the other devs are Ruby/Rails guys...they all see me as a "sellout" for using .NET (and maybe I am?)...but when it comes to choosing what platform to learn and code in, I'm pretty happy with Microsoft in general. It's a lot easier for me to find a job doing .NET than it is for them in Ruby/Rails...and in 5 years they'll have to throw out everything they learned about Ruby/Rails because the fanboyism that drives their community will have moved on to the next "big shiny thing" (Scala?)...I'll still be writing code in C#...Does that make me a sellout? Maybe, but I'll take more money for less work and less drama any day of the week.
Hardware

+ - Demo of Laptop/Tabletop Hybrid UI->

Submitted by TheGrapeApe
TheGrapeApe (833505) writes "The ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (ACMUIST) has an interesting proof-of-concept video up demonstrating the use of cameras and laser pico-projectors to "extend" a laptop's user interface to adjacent surfaces. The video demonstrates some simple gestures like tapping and dragging being captured on the "extended" surface. While the prototype appears to be somewhat cumbersome, it's easy to see how it might be more elegantly integrated into the hardware with more R&D. The system was developed by researchers at the University of Washington."
Link to Original Source

Comment: We'll save so much money by hiring Russian coders (Score 1) 324

by TheGrapeApe (#28593977) Attached to: Goldman Sachs Trading Source Code In the Wild?
Flashback to a meeting with a bunch of douchebag MBAs 4 years ago at Goldman Sachs:

MBA Dbag 1: "We'll save so much money by moving these coding jobs overseas to Russia! American coders are getting too expensive!"

MBA Dbag2: "I don't see any drawbacks. Let's do it. As long as they can't outsource us playing phonetag and having meetings with each other all day, right?"

Comment: You can take this process and shove it (Score 2, Interesting) 436

by TheGrapeApe (#28520469) Attached to: Does the 'Hacker Ethic' Harm Today's Developers?

and they're less likely to conform to organizational development processes and coding standards.

A lot of times, the "Cowboy Coding" is more effective because the "development processes and coding standards" were implemented and enforced by phonetaggers who have never written a productive line of code in their entire lives. Those who are inclined to break them, naturally, are more productive and seem more effective - despite the grumblings of the phonetaggers that they are "unmanageable".

But, really - Does "management" have any right to blame them? They spent the last decade proving to every developer the idea that if you allow yourself or your work to be commoditized, we will ship you or your job overseas where it can be done cheaper. And "development processes and coding standards" are usually implemented with the intent of "commoditizing", to a certain degree, the work of coding....and you're going to blame the *developers* for rejecting that? Middle management in the US basically *created* the environment that forced developers to either become "Cowboys" or to compete with people making $4/hr overseas.

Speaking on behalf of coders everywhere - You can take your "development processes and coding standards" and shove it - I'll keep my job and let you grumble under your breath about how I am "unmanageable", thank you.

Comment: Chocolate (Score 1) 902

by TheGrapeApe (#28282283) Attached to: How Do IT Guys Get Respect and Not Become BOFHs?
Keep a small supply of chocolate (I find that the mini-Doves work best) with you at work for "desk-calls". People will be more inclined to communicate with you early and often (as opposed to after a huge disaster has started) if you bring them chocolate.

Another tip: Be specific when you are explaining you might have to deflect a call. "I have to fix something for Bob right away but I'll see you as soon as I'm done." is much better than just saying "Sorry, I'm really busy and I can't help you right now.".

Comment: Oh please (Score 1) 716

by TheGrapeApe (#28254959) Attached to: Kids Score 40 Percent Higher When They Get Paid For Grades
Again and again...why does *no one* understand the simple principle of CORRELATION DOES NOT EQUAL CAUSATION? The teachers may have inflated the kids grades...what if you were one of those teachers? And the low-income kids really needed that $500? I would do the same thing; Give everyone an A, whether they earned it or not...would not want to be responsible for them starving...
The Almighty Buck

+ - FBI invited to look at Second Life casinos

Submitted by UnanimousCoward
UnanimousCoward (9841) writes "Yahoo! is running an article reporting that Second Life has invited the FBI to tour their casinos, and that the FBI has indeed visited but will not comment. With the U.S. crackdown on Internet gambling, visits to Second Life casinos has increased (using Linden dollars that have been exchanged for "real" currency). From TFA:

Most lawyers agree that placing bets with Linden dollars likely violates U.S. anti-gambling statutes, which cover circumstances in which "something of value" is wagered. But the degree of Linden Lab's responsibility, and the likelihood of a any crackdown, is uncertain.
"

My problem lies in reconciling my gross habits with my net income. -- Errol Flynn Any man who has $10,000 left when he dies is a failure. -- Errol Flynn

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