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Space

Two Exocomet Families Found Around Baby Star System 23

Posted by samzenpus
from the across-the-universe dept.
astroengine writes Scientists have found two families of comets in the developing Beta Pictoris star system, located about 64 light-years from Earth, including one group that appears to be remnants of a smashed-up protoplanet. The discovery bolsters our theoretical understanding of the violent processes that led to the formation of Earth and the other terrestrial planets in the solar system. "If you look back at the solar system when it was only 22 million years old, you might have seen phenomena that's a like more like what's happening in Beta Pic," astrophysicist Aki Roberge, with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., told Discovery News.

Comment: Interesting trick (Score 5, Interesting) 161

by TheDarkMaster (#48197603) Attached to: Cell Transplant Allows Paralyzed Man To Walk
I read some time ago that the olfactory cells are one of the few nerve cells that maintains the ability to reproduce and create new connections, then it seems that the researchers basically created a "hard hack" with that. Interesting, and hopefully it will be applicable in many similar cases.
Medicine

Cell Transplant Allows Paralyzed Man To Walk 161

Posted by Soulskill
from the saved-by-a-nose dept.
New submitter tiberus sends word of a breakthrough medical treatment that has restored the ability to walk to a man who was paralyzed from the chest down after his spinal cord was severed in a knife attack. A research team from the UK, led by Professor Geoff Raisman, transplanted cells from the patient's nose, along with strips of nerve tissue from his ankle, to the place where the spine was severed. This allowed the fibers in the spinal cord to gradually reconnect. The treatment used olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) - specialist cells that form part of the sense of smell. ... In the first of two operations, surgeons removed one of the patient's olfactory bulbs and grew the cells in culture. Two weeks later they transplanted the OECs into the spinal cord, which had been cut through in the knife attack apart from a thin strip of scar tissue on the right. They had just a drop of material to work with - about 500,000 cells. About 100 micro-injections of OECs were made above and below the injury. Four thin strips of nerve tissue were taken from the patient's ankle and placed across an 8mm (0.3in) gap on the left side of the cord. ... Two years after the treatment, he can now walk outside the rehabilitation center using a frame.

Comment: Re:Technical solution for s social problem (Score 1) 113

by TheDarkMaster (#48183817) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Good Hosting Service For a Parody Site?
In countries like mine, freedom of expression exists only on paper. So I understand the concern of the author of the topic as if I wanted to make a website I would also be targeted by fraudulent takedown requests in the first time that I write anything that a rich man or politician disliked.

Comment: Re:So much for colonization plans... (Score 1) 63

by TheDarkMaster (#48150975) Attached to: MAVEN Spies Mars' Atmosphere Leaching Out Into Space
I think you misunderstand my concern. I know that the atmosphere is not going anywhere in the short term by exactly the factors you described. What concerned me on the probe data is the long-term. For example, if the water continues decomposing as the probe detected without having something to replace it, then sometime in the future the planet really will not have any more water (ignoring here the possibility of underground ice, as we do no have enough data about this yet). And if in the distant future someone could change the atmosphere for something breathable, the data suggest that it would be a job that would last a short time in planetary scales (so, bad for permanent colonies).
Supercomputing

First Demonstration of Artificial Intelligence On a Quantum Computer 98

Posted by Soulskill
from the teaching-a-new-dog-old-tricks dept.
KentuckyFC writes: Machine learning algorithms use a training dataset to learn how to recognize features in images and use this 'knowledge' to spot the same features in new images. The computational complexity of this task is such that the time required to solve it increases in polynomial time with the number of images in the training set and the complexity of the "learned" feature. So it's no surprise that quantum computers ought to be able to rapidly speed up this process. Indeed, a group of theoretical physicists last year designed a quantum algorithm that solves this problem in logarithmic time rather than polynomial, a significant improvement.

Now, a Chinese team has successfully implemented this artificial intelligence algorithm on a working quantum computer, for the first time. The information processor is a standard nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computer capable of handling 4 qubits. The team trained it to recognize the difference between the characters '6' and '9' and then asked it to classify a set of handwritten 6s and 9s accordingly, which it did successfully. The team says this is the first time that this kind of artificial intelligence has ever been demonstrated on a quantum computer and opens the way to the more rapid processing of other big data sets — provided, of course, that physicists can build more powerful quantum computers.

Comment: Re:So much for colonization plans... (Score 1) 63

by TheDarkMaster (#48148377) Attached to: MAVEN Spies Mars' Atmosphere Leaching Out Into Space
The norm is to ignore ACs, but ... I wonder why humanity allows a piece of shit with no imagination, no dreams, no ambitions, hateful, stupid, coward and ignorant as you living among us. Never say "never", AC... I am dismayed by the news that Mars may be airless in the distant future, but I'm far from giving up as you.

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