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Comment: Re:Is negotiation a skill required for the job? (Score 1) 892

I disagree. I've regularly negotiated better salaries than my co-workers. In many cases, I've negotiated better salaries than my bosses. I can do this because I have a strong basis upon which to negotiate. I'm generally better at what I do than most of my co-workers. I don't say it to brag. But I am and I negotiate from that position: I deserve more because I'm better at it than the average person and I have the track record to back that up. Should I now be paid what the average guy is paid? I'm not going to want to work for a company that doesn't appreciate the value I bring to the job (unless, of course, the job is just really cool, in which case salary takes a back seat).

Comment: Re:If you demand all your supporters be flawless.. (Score 1) 653

by Pedrito (#49416337) Attached to: Carly Fiorina Calls Apple's Tim Cook a 'Hypocrite' On Gay Rights
Jesus said nothing. Paul did comment on it, however, so Christians often use that as the basis of their new testament argument. Also the new covenant doesn't mean you completely ignore mosaic law, but I admit to being quite confounded by the distinction. Bottom line, though is that Jesus said to "love your neighbor as yourself." It's in two of the gospels. He didn't make exceptions for homosexuals. And Jesus DID comment on divorce (Matthew 19:9) and you don't see a lot of Christians denying services to remarried people whose original spouses didn't commit adultery.

Comment: Religious hypocrisy (Score 0) 1168

The problem with all this hate disguised as religion is that it doesn't hold up. It's complete and utter hypocrisy. Homosexuality is called a sin in both Leviticus and 1 Corinthians. Leviticus and 1 Corinthians also say that tattoos are a sin. My wife and I attend an evangelical church in the south and it doesn't escape our attention that there are a great many congregants with tattoos. Especially those cute ankle and back of the neck ones... You don't see Christians up in arms about them getting married or refusing them service. In Matthew 19:9, Jesus said that a man who divorces his wife, except for adultery, and remarries is himself committing adultery. 1/3-1/2 of all divorces in the U.S. don't involve adultery, and yet do you see Christians refusing these people service or refusing the remarry them? Jesus said the second most important commandment was to "love your neighbor as yourself." It's quoted in two Gospels, Mark and Matthew. He didn't say there's an exception for homosexuals. In fact, he never said anything about homosexuals. The Christian right in this country reminds me of the Pharisees in the bible. Trying to interpret who God would judge and passing their own judgment instead of leaving the judgment to God and loving their neighbor, regardless of their neighbors sins because, after all, the bible tells us that we are all sinners.
Android

De-escalating the Android Patent War 63

Posted by Soulskill
from the can't-we-all-just-bilk-the-USPTO-together dept.
In 2011, a consortium formed from Microsoft, Apple, Sony, BlackBerry, and others spent $4.5 billion acquiring Nortel's patent portfolio, which contained a great deal of ammunition that could be used against Android. That threat has now been reduced. Today, 4,000 of the patents were purchased by a corporation called RPX, which has licensing agreements from Google, Cisco, and dozens more companies. [RPX is] a company that collects a bunch of patents with the goal of using those patents for member companies for defensive purposes. Even though RPX has generally been "good," the business model basically lives because of patent trolling. Its very existence is because of all the patent trolling and abuse out there. In this case, though, it's making sure that basically anyone can license these patents under FRAND (fair and reasonable, non-discriminatory) rates. The price being paid is approximately $900 million. While that article points out that this is considerably less than the $4.5 billion Microsoft and Apple paid originally, again, this is only 4,000 of the 6,000 patents, and you have to assume the 2,000 the other companies kept were the really valuable patents. In short, this is basically Google and Cisco (with some help from a few others) licensing these patents to stop the majority of the lawsuits -- while also making sure that others can pay in as well should they feel threatened. Of course, Microsoft, Apple and the others still have control over the really good patents they kept for themselves, rather than give to Rockstar. And the whole thing does nothing for innovation other than shift around some money.

Comment: Re:America! (Score 2, Insightful) 230

by Pedrito (#48629323) Attached to: "Team America" Gets Post-Hack Yanking At Alamo Drafthouse, Too
In all seriousness, though, I think Sony ought to release the movie and I think everyone who believes in free speech ought to buy a ticket, whether they see it or not. Let's turn this movie into a blockbuster! That's the American thing to do! Well, at least back when Americans acted like Americans.

Comment: Go see the movie (Score 1) 182

by Pedrito (#48625233) Attached to: US Links North Korea To Sony Hacking
I wasn't planning on seeing the movie, but I'm going to see it if they release it now and I think ever American who believes in free speech ought to do what they can to make this movie into a blockbuster. You don't even have to watch it if you don't want to. Just buy a ticket. How better to show that free speech will not be run off by a bunch of hackers. Or are we going to tuck tail and run? Right now it's looking like tuck tail as movie theaters are pulling it and Sony might even pull it. How pathetic.

Comment: Smarthost out via SMTP.Comcast.net on 465 or 587 (Score 2) 405

by Hobart (#48382497) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How To Unblock Email From My Comcast-Hosted Server?

You're being blocked because any mail leaving Comcast's IP spaces is expected to come from Comcast's mailservers only.

Configure your mailserver with a "smarthost" option, have it deliver using Authenticated SMTP (with your Comcast account's username and password hardcoded, yes) over SSL on 465, or if you can't do SSL, use 587.

Source: Am currently running Postfix on Comcast successfully delivering to Yahoo Mail with no spamfolder problem via this method. (Am using SPF, no DomainKeys yet.)

More from Comcast on this: http://corporate.comcast.com/c...

Comment: Re:Only YEC denies it (Score 2, Interesting) 669

by Pedrito (#48259949) Attached to: Pope Francis Declares Evolution and Big Bang Theory Are Right
As someone who lives in the U.S. South (Arkansas), this is not the belief of most evangelicals. My wife is a devout Christian and our church is an evangelical church (though not like most that you're probably familiar with. Our church is very into being Christians and not so much talking about how Christian they are. They spend the vast majority of their money helping people in poverty while meeting in a Boys & Girls Club gym instead of building a real church.) But among the religious around here, there's very little belief in evolution or the big bang. That said, the local Christian university (John Brown University) has a pretty good evolutionary biology program. So there's some hope for the future, but not as much as I'd like. Science is definitely taking a back seat with evangelicals in the South. It's a pretty tragic state for the future of science in this country. The South certainly won't be contributing a lot to modern cosmology or evolutionary biology.

Comment: Re:We NEED more public discussions at universities (Score 1) 1007

by Pedrito (#48243735) Attached to: Creationism Conference at Michigan State University Stirs Unease
That's all fine, but when people want to have "scientific debate" but they don't want to bring their science along, it's no longer a scientific debate. They want to try to "debunk" evolution and big bang, but to legitimately do that, they need to bring science into the equation and they can't, because they don't have scientific claims that can be validated. I'm perfectly fine with them having a conference at a church or wherever people want to debate religion. But it must be sold as a religious debate to be fair, not a scientific debate. The bottom line is creationism isn't science and to try to sell it as such as disingenuous at best, fraudulent is more apt. It's faith. And science doesn't have a place for faith (which is not the same as saying science doesn't have a place for people of faith). Once they have a testable hypothesis, I'm all about letting them join the scientific debate.

Comment: It's in the license! (Score 2) 572

by Pedrito (#48220441) Attached to: FTDI Removes Driver From Windows Update That Bricked Cloned Chips
The FTDI driver license states "The license only allows use of the Software with, and the Software will only work with Genuine FTDI Components. Use of the Software as a driver for a component that is not a Genuine FTDI Component may irretrievably damage that component. It is your responsibility to make sure that all chips you use the Software as a driver for are Genuine FTDI Components." Surely they neglected to share this with their lawyer. You can't punish users because the manufacturers are breaking the law. How is my mother going to know if she has a genuine FTDI chip or not? That's just asinine.

Comment: Google & ISC have MeasurementLab.NET (Score 2) 294

by Hobart (#48105041) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: An Accurate Broadband Speed Test?

The Network Diagnostic Test was able to see performance problems on my cablemodem connection that Ookla's speedtests did not.

http://www.measurementlab.net/...

Unfortunately, the number of ridiculous hoops you need to go through to let an unsigned Java applet run an arbitrary network I/O makes it much less useful.

Comment: Re:Graphics appear to be closed/proprietary. (Score 2) 106

From the Matchstick SDK download agreement: (abridged)

4. Restrictions. You agree not to exploit ... content provided to you as a Registered Matchstick Developer, in any unauthorized way ... other than for authorized purposes. Copyright and other intellectual property laws protect ... content provided to you, and you agree to abide by and maintain all notices, license information, and restrictions contained therein. You may not decompile, reverse engineer, disassemble, attempt to derive the source code of any software or software components of the Matchstick software including the Matchstick SDK software.

"Open Source Hardware" ?

You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means. — Inigo Montoya

Comment: Graphics appear to be closed/proprietary. (Score 5, Informative) 106

The Rockchip 3066 appears to use ARM's proprietary Mali T-series graphics. No, thanks.

Quote from the dev lead on the Mali graphics:

"I really do understand your frustration and I'm sorry that this makes life harder for you and similar developers. We are genuinely not against Open Source, as I hope I've tried to explain. I myself spent a long time working on the Linux kernel in the past and I wish I could give you a simple answer. Unfortunately, it is a genuinely complex problem, with a lot of trade-offs and judgements to be made as well as economic and legal issues. Ultimately I cannot easily reduce this to an answer here, and probably not to one that will satisfy you. Rest assured that you are not being ignored. However, as a relatively small company with a business model that is Partner driven, the resources that we have, need to be applied to projects in ways that meet Partner requirements."
(2014-09) ARM Still Not Doing Open Drivers

You should never bet against anything in science at odds of more than about 10^12 to 1. -- Ernest Rutherford

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