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Data Storage

27 Billion Gigabytes to be Archived by 2010 178

Posted by timothy
from the if-not-sooner dept.
Lucas123 writes "According to a Computerworld survey of IT managers, data storage projects are the No. 2 project priority for corporations in 2008, up from No. 4 in 2007. IT teams are looking into clustered architectures and centralized storage-area networks as one way to control capacity growth, shifting away from big-iron storage and custom applications. The reason for the data avalanche? Archive data. In the private sector alone electronic archives will take up 27,000 petabytes (27 billion gigabytes) by 2010. E-mail growth accounts for much of that figure."
Announcements

+ - Cutty Sark ablaze

Submitted by
The Mysterious X
The Mysterious X writes "The BBC is reporting that Cutty Sark, the 19th centuary clipper, is on fire. Greenwich town centre has been closed, as has the docklands light railway, and reports indicate there are 40 firefighters on scene fighting the blaze. The latest news is that 100% of the ship is on fire, and it is feared that gas bottles onboard, left there due to renovation works may explode. Firefighters are treating the blaze as suspicious."

Toshiba's NC-MR technology could boost HDD capacity 'tenfold'->

From feed by engfeed
Just days after Fujitsu tooted its own horn and suggested that it could increase hard drive capacity by 500-percent in a mere two years comes word that Toshiba coincidentally has a similarly grandiose claim. Aside from the obvious leapfrog game that's being played here, Tosh has apparently been working hand-in-hand with Tohoku University to develop "a phenomenon" dubbed Nanocontact Magnetic Resistance, or NC-MR, in which an "enormous difference in magnetoresistance is achieved when two magnetic materials are situated close together and connected by a contact point that narrows to around 1-nanometer." Put simply, the prototype NC-MR structure is twice as large as today's read heads, and elements based on the NC-MR structure would have a "lower resistance than existing TMR elements, enabling the read heads to be miniaturized and still operate quickly." Of course, these sensational claims have yet to make it beyond the drawing board, and while you may be anxious to get one of these in your rig, you'll be waiting about five years or so if things continue as planned. [Warning: Read link requires subscription]

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Office Depot Featured Gadget: Xbox 360 Platinum System Packs the power to bring games to life!


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Programming

+ - Is computer science dead?

Submitted by warm sushi
warm sushi (168223) writes "An academic at the British Computing Society asks Is computer science dead? Citing falling student enrolments, and improved technology, British academic Neil McBride claims that off-the-shelf solutions are removing much of the demand for high level development skills: "As commercial software products have matured, it no longer makes sense for organisations to develop software from scratch. Accounting packages, enterprise resource packages, customer relationship management systems are the order of the day: stable, well-proven and easily available." Is that quote laughable? Or has the software development industry stabilised to an off-the-self commodity?"
Software

+ - OpenOffice.org Submits Open Letter to Dell

Submitted by jlbooker
jlbooker (1074833) writes "OpenOffice.org has submitted an open letter to Michael Dell in response to the overwhelming requests on Dell's IdeaStorm site for the OpenOffice.org 2 software suite to be factory-installed on Dell systems. From the letter: "Let's have a conversation about how we could build an "OpenOffice.org supplied by Dell" product to give your customers what they are asking for.""
Media

Is DRM Intrinsically Distasteful? 631

Posted by Zonk
from the tastes-like-chicken dept.
jelton writes "If digital media was available for sale at a reasonable price, but subject to a DRM scheme that allowed full legitimate usage (format shifting, time shifting, playback on different devices, etc.) and only blocked illicit usage (illegal copying), would you support the usage of such a DRM scheme? Especially if it meant a wealth of readily available compatible devices? In other words, if you object to DRM schemes, is your objection based on principled or practical concerns?"
Businesses

Is 'Web 2.0' Another Bubble? 209

Posted by Zonk
from the pop dept.
Carl Bialik from WSJ writes "Two tech VCs, Todd Dagres and David Hornik, debate whether there is a bubble in so-called Web 2.0 companies looking to cash in on a resurgent online ad market. In the WSJ.com debate, Hornik writes: 'Venture capitalists will rationally stop investing in ideas that don't bear fruit. Those that do bear fruit will gain traction and either be acquired or go public. Those are the traits of a rational market in my mind.' Dagres responds: 'I think the Web 2.0 space will have a higher mortality rate than other segments of the overall media and technology industries. There are far too many MySpace and YouTube genetically challenged clones. All but a few will fail. The winners are generally the ones that get in early and out before the bubble bursts. There are rare examples of bubble companies making it through the bust and going on to become successful and valuable companies. By the way, the combined cash flow of Spot Runner, LinkedIn and Facebook is less than that of one Costco store.'"
Security

Small Businesses Worry About MS Anti-Phishing 291

Posted by kdawson
from the green-means-good dept.
prostoalex writes "Ever get that warm feeling of safety, when the anti-phishing toolbar on Microsoft Internet Explorer 7 turns green, telling you it's safe to shop on the site you're visiting? Well, you probably don't, but the millions of Internet users who will soon be running IE7 probably will be paying attention to the anti-phishing warnings. WSJ.com is reporting on how Microsoft is making it tough for small businesses to assure they're treated properly by the anti-phishing algorithm." From the article: "[S]ole proprietorships, general partnerships and individuals won't be eligible for the new, stricter security certificates that Microsoft requires to display the color. There are about 20.6 million sole proprietorships and general partnerships in the U.S... though it isn't clear how many are engaged in e-commerce... 'Are people going to trust the green more than white? Yes, they will,' says Avivah Litan, an analyst at Gartner Inc. and an expert on online payments and fraud. 'All the business is going to go to the greens, it's kind of obvious.'"
Security

Would You Trust RFID-Enabled ATM Cards? 214

Posted by Cliff
from the bringing-new-meaning-to-'pick-pocketing' dept.
race_k2 asks: "As a regular Slashdot reader I've followed the development and implementation of RFID devices in many ubiquitous areas such as clothing, passports and even people. Given that our environment is becoming increasingly tagged, often without our knowledge or consent, and can be monitored or hacked by anyone with the proper hardware, skills and motivation, I viewed the recent arrival of two new ATM cards containing RFID chips with skepticism. While this feature may bring the increased convenience of speedy checkouts, it is not something I am completely comfortable using and decided that the safety of my personal data was more important than the ability to buy things quickly. The vulnerable nature of RFID security coupled with recent, though unrelated, reports of a Possible Security Flaw In ATMs make me seriously question whether the marriage of wireless data transfer with personal finance is a wise application of technology." So race's question basically boils down to: How safe and secure are the RFID chips that are being embedded in debit and credit cards? To add another issue on to the fire: Would you trust RFID technology on your cards?
Yahoo!

Yahoo Pushing IE7 On Firefox Users 300

Posted by kdawson
from the buy-my-free-browser-please dept.
El Lobo writes "Looks like things are heating up again in the browser wars. Google has been openly supporting Firefox, so now Yahoo is displaying a new feature on search results pages for FireFox users. It appears that Yahoo is pushing downloads of IE7 from Microsoft and including itself as the default search engine installed in the file menu area." I got the invitation to download IE7 when running Firefox on a Mac, and even when running IE5 under CrossOver; but not when running IE7 under Parallels.

Virtualization Disallowed For Vista Home 369

Posted by Zonk
from the little-bossy dept.
Maxx writes to mention a ZDNet article about Microsoft's dictum on Vista as a virtual machine. The software giant has declared that home versions of their upcoming OS may not be run virtually, because 'virtualization is not mature enough for broad adoption.' From the article: "'Microsoft says that consumers don't understand the risks of running virtual machines, and they only want enterprises that understand the risks to run Vista on a VM. So, Microsoft removes user choice in the name of security,' says Gartner analyst Michael Silver. 'The other option is to pay Microsoft US$300 for Windows Vista Business or US$399 for Windows Ultimate, instead of US$200 for Home Basic or US$239 for Home Premium,' Silver suggested."

Windows Chief Suggests Vista Won't Need Antivirus 361

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the steadfastly-bulletproof dept.
LadyDarth writes "During a telephone conference with reporters yesterday, outgoing Microsoft co-president Jim Allchin, while touting the new security features of Windows Vista, which was released to manufacturing yesterday, told a reporter that the system's new lockdown features are so capable and thorough that he was comfortable with his own seven-year-old son using Vista without antivirus software installed."

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