Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: The culture (Score 2) 116

by computational super (#47019953) Attached to: Finding More Than One Worm In the Apple
Yeah, the "culture" is "hurry up and get it done so you can get on to the next thing because if something takes more than an hour to do it's not worth doing" and it exists in every single software development organization on planet Earth. Until these things actually start costing real money to people with real power, this will continue.

Comment: Although I agree... (Score 0) 264

by computational super (#46893905) Attached to: An MIT Dean's Defense of the Humanities
Well, he's right, but unfortunately, the study of humanities in modern higher education has become a wasteland of anti-academic thinkers who viciously punish nonconformity and "ists" with an ax to grind and a debt to wring out of people whose ancestors they believe slighted their ancestors. He's describing what humanities ought to be rather than what they actually are.

Comment: Re:Am I the only one.. (Score 1) 158

by computational super (#46210695) Attached to: Non-Coders As the Face of the Learn-to-Code Movements
> will produce code so bad they'll have to bring me in to fix it. That's not necessarily a great position to be in - you'll be six months behind schedule the minute you set foot in the door, and you'll spend half your time in meetings explaining why it's taking so long to fix "that one thing that went wrong". And God forbid you ever suggest a ground-up rewrite.

Comment: Re:Am I the only one.. (Score 1) 158

by computational super (#46210637) Attached to: Non-Coders As the Face of the Learn-to-Code Movements
> The fewer who want to code, the better for the negotiating power and leverage of coders and technologists going into the future. ... which is exactly the point of the initiative. People who can code want too much money, and have outrageous demands like the right to go home and see their families from time to time. Remember you're dealing with people who, deep in their hearts, believe that there's a simple, cheap, instant on-demand solution to absolutely every single problem they can think of (after all, that's what they were taught at MBA school). If the programmers can't produce something RIGHT NOW for a marginal cost of $0.00, then the problem lies with the programmers themselves.

Comment: Re:Is this a cuteness thing? (Score 4, Insightful) 628

by The Living Fractal (#46016329) Attached to: 200 Dolphins Await Slaughter In Japan's Taiji Cove
Maybe it has something to do with the fact that a dolphin is demonstrably smarter than a chicken and because of that people feel it is more likely to experience pain and suffering during this "fishing".

Not a personal opinion of mine, just one hypothesis for the reaction.
United States

Oregon Signs Up Just 44 People For Obamacare Despite Spending $300 Million 586

Posted by samzenpus
from the try-again-later dept.
cold fjord writes "The Washington Examiner reports, 'Oregon ... signed up just 44 people for insurance through November, despite spending more than $300 million on its state-based exchange. The state's exchange had the fewest sign-ups in the nation, according to a new report today by the Department of Health and Human Services. The weak number of sign-ups undercuts two major defenses of Obamacare from its supporters. One defense was that state-based exchanges were performing a lot better than the federal healthcare.gov website servicing 36 states. But Oregon's website problems have forced the state to rely on paper applications to sign up participants. Another defense of the Obama administration has attributed the troubled rollout of Obamacare to the obstruction of Republican governors who wanted to see the law fail as well as a lack of funding. But Oregon is a Democratic state that embraced Obamacare early and enthusiastically.'"
Privacy

Credit Card Numbers Still Google-able 157

Posted by Soulskill
from the information-is-not-good-at-judging-when-it-should-want-to-be-free dept.
Slashdot contributor Bennett Haselton writes "In 2007, I wrote that you could find troves of credit card numbers on Google, most of them still active, using the simple trick of Googling the first 8 digits of your credit card number. The trick itself had been publicized by other writers at least as far back as 2004, but in 2013, it appears to still be just as easy. One possible solution that I didn't consider last time, would be for Google itself to notify the webmasters and credit card companies of the leaked information, and then display a warning alongside the search results." Read on for the rest of Bennett's thoughts.

Sigmund Freud is alleged to have said that in the last analysis the entire field of psychology may reduce to biological electrochemistry.

Working...