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The Internet

Submission + - slashdot.org has no AAAA record

terrymr writes: "How can we nerds be taken seriously when our own "News for Nerds" site is not available by IPV6. This is trivial to set up for anyone who's willing to spend a few minutes researching it. So where is it guys ?"
Television

Submission + - In Soviet US, Comcast watches YOU (newteevee.com) 4

cayenne8 writes: Ok, this is interesting. At the Digital Living Room conference recently, Gerard Kunkel, Comcast's senior VP of user experience stated that the cable company is experimenting with different camera technologies built into devices so it can know who's in your living room — According to this article from Newteevee.com. They're experimenting with cameras on the settop boxes that while apparently NOT using facial recognition software, can still somehow figure out who is in the room, and customize user preferences for cable (favorite channels, etc).

While this sounds 'handy', it also sounds a bit like the tv sets in 1984, where Big Brother watches you, as you watch tv. I am sure, of course, that Comcast wouldn't tap into this for any reason, nor let the authorities tap into this to watch inside your home in real time without a warrant or anything.

I don't think even my tinfoil hat would help with this...

Classic Games (Games)

Submission + - Hidden Palace releases hundreds of SEGA prototypes (hidden-palace.org) 1

QJimbo writes: "The man, simply known as drx, has released a huge archive of prototype games over BitTorrent, allowing us to have a facinating inside into the game development patterns of the 1990s.
'Quick numbers: 155 Sega 32x prototypes, 300 Game Gear prototypes, 464 Mega Drive prototypes, 94 Pico prototypes, 6 Gamecube prototypes — 1024 prototype overall (what a nice round number!), making this the biggest prototype release in history (and probably ever to come). Just multiply this by $100 (which is the average price of these things, and many of them are MUCH more valuable) and you'll see how lucky you are to get them free of charge. There is lots of stuff here — Sonic, Ristar, and many other high-profile, hard-to-find game prototypes which many of us played years back and miss. Many with different features, levels, hidden data.'"

Space

Submission + - Earth's Evil Twin (esa.int)

Riding with Robots writes: "For the past two years, Europe's Venus Express orbiter has been studying Earth's planetary neighbor up close. Today, mission scientists have released a new collection of findings and amazing images. They include evidence of lightning and other results that flesh out a portrait of a planet that is in many ways like ours, and in many ways hellishly different, such as surface temperatures over 400C and air pressure a hundred times that on Earth."
Nintendo

Submission + - Nintendo DS TV Tuner News (dcemu.co.uk)

bandit writes: "Nintendo has underestimated the demand for their soon to be released Nintendo DS TV Tuner. The TV Tuner is to be released in Japan on November 23rd for 6,800 yen (about $60USD). Since the peripheral is not a game, Nintendo started to accept orders without making prior announcements regarding placing orders which started on November 8th. The TV Tuner allows the DS to pick up Japan's 1seg TV broadcast service. No word if a TV Tuner would be released in the US or in Europe."
The Internet

Submission + - "Sex on this beach is being recorded..." (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "Florida's Martin County, officials are debating the use of talking, networked Web security cameras to scare off people looking to have sex on the beach. No word on what the systems does if you show up there looking to just, say, get a tan. Officials are concerned about a number of recent arrests of men soliciting men for sex at county beaches in the Palm Beach area. Proponents say they want cameras to watch all beaches and parking lots but not public bathrooms because that would be an invasion of privacy. http://www.networkworld.com/community/node/22133"
Programming

Submission + - gcc says -10==10 (lkml.org) 6

An anonymous reader writes: A bug in gcc causes it to think -10*abs(x) and 10*abs(x) have the same value. Just compile the following small program:

int main( void )
{
    int i=2;
    if( -10*abs (i-1) == 10*abs(i-1) )
        printf ("OMG,-10==10 in linux!\n");
    else
        printf ("nothing special here\n") ;
    return 0 ;
}

The Courts

Submission + - Bill Nye The Science Guy Wants Restraining Order

An anonymous reader writes: The popular science guru Bill Nye the Science Guy has applied for a restraining order against a woman who he almost married last year. Blair Tindall appeared in Nye's garden at night, dressed in black, with bottles of herbicide, apparently attempting to wreck Nye's vegetables. He was also worried that she would squirt him with the toxic herbicide, but she denies being a threat to him. Tindall accuses Nye of "emotional cruelty" after their marriage turned out to be invalid.
Movies

Submission + - Bye Bye Movies

davetree writes: "First Demonoid.com and now Mininova servers are kaput. CRIA is making a sweep. For all of us in far rural areas this is more than unfortunate. Will hybrid clients like Azureus stay up?"
The Almighty Buck

Submission + - Close but no Cigar from Netflix 1

Ponca City, We Love You writes: "In October 2006, Netflix, the online movie rental service, announced that it would award $1 million to the first team to improve the accuracy of Netflix's movie recommendations by 10% based on personal preferences. Each contestant was given a set of data from which three million predictions were made about how certain users rated certain movies and Netflix compared that list with the actual ratings and generated a score for each team. More than 27,000 contestants from 161 countries submitted their entries and some got close, but not close enough. Today Netflix announced that it is awarding an annual progress prize of $50,000 to a group of researchers at AT&T Labs, who improved the current recommendation system by 8.43 percent but the $1 million grand prize is still up for grabs and a $50,000 progress prize will be awarded every year until the 10 percent goal is met. As part of the rules of the competition, the team was required to disclose their solution publicly. (pdf)"
Biotech

Submission + - Ham Radio Operator Finds Cure For Cancer (latimes.com) 5

CirReal writes: "John Kanzius, K3TUP, himself suffering from cancer with nine months to live, used nanotechnology and a radio transmitter to kill cancer cells. "Kanzius did not have a medical background, not even a bachelor's degree, but he knew radios. He had built and fixed them since he was a child, collecting transmitters, transceivers, antennas and amplifiers, earning an amateur radio operator license. Kanzius knew how to send radio wave signals around the world. If he could transmit them into cancer cells, he wondered, could he then direct the radio waves to destroy tumors, while leaving healthy cells intact?" Reseachers "recently killed 100% of cancer cells grown in the livers of rabbits, using Kanzius' method.""
User Journal

Journal Journal: [food] Cornmeal Muffins 1

It has been a while since I have posted a bread recipe of any sort here. The last two or three I posted on Multiply as an experiment. I think I will just stick to posting these here.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Writing for Wikipedia has its Perks 1

There are many tasks on Wikipedia. Some people fact check. Some people control vandalism. Some people correct spelling and punctuation. The activity that I most enjoy is doing the research to write in-depth articles for Wikipedia. I like to find a musician, an actor, a politician, or a scientist that I am interested in learning more about and write their biography from scratch. Last week my wife and I went to a concert by one

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