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Comment: Re:Let it die (Score 1) 507

by Reziac (#46717099) Attached to: How Cochlear Implants Are Being Blamed For Killing Deaf Culture

Lazy was probably not the best word. But people do generally avoid needless work, and when that was something you formerly had to do to survive, it can be perceived as 'lazy'. If the deaf person can now hear and has no pressing need for ASL, why go to all the extra work of learning or maintaining your ASL?

Comment: Re:Let it die (Score 1) 507

by Reziac (#46717051) Attached to: How Cochlear Implants Are Being Blamed For Killing Deaf Culture

I've heard basically the same about 'dwarf culture' -- that when surgical techniques for increasing leg length became a realistic treatment, there was a huge backlash against it, as if being able to be 'fixed' invalidated all the existing dwarfs.

And don't think it doesn't exist among the blind, too. A friend who is partially sighted has been on both sides of the fence, and while immersed in it, railed against the same crap in the blind community.

Comment: Re:Now replace "deaf culture" in your text (Score 1) 507

by Reziac (#46716961) Attached to: How Cochlear Implants Are Being Blamed For Killing Deaf Culture

When I was a kid I lived next door to the deaf-and-blind school. Every kid in the neighborhood played on the grounds. We never saw the blind kids, but when we'd see the deaf kids out on the grounds, we'd try to include them in our games. But they would not play with the rest of us.

Comment: Re:who cares (Score 1) 641

by Reziac (#46708229) Attached to: Meet the Diehards Who Refuse To Move On From Windows XP

Some people fail basic math... Frex, this handy story problem:

new truck: $500/mo. payment, $200/mo. insurance, $500/yr lic.
old truck: $700 in repairs on average every 3 years, which is $20/month, permanent lic. $270 one-time cost, ins. $10/mo.
Both get about the same gas mileage.
Which one is more expensive to own??

Comment: Re:Good for you. (Score 1) 641

by Reziac (#46708117) Attached to: Meet the Diehards Who Refuse To Move On From Windows XP

There was a story here a while back about where someone had pulled together stats, total number of computers vs how many were infected (I don't remember precisely how they collected the data, but I vaguely recall it was from a search engine's logs). We were all astounded to read that the infection rate was only 0.4% of all internet-connected computers.

Comment: Re:Personally (Score 1) 641

by Reziac (#46708037) Attached to: Meet the Diehards Who Refuse To Move On From Windows XP

Same here. I'd have to replace the whole machine to 'upgrade' the OS, and there's nothing Win7/8 can do for me and my current needs that XP can't. Firewall and router, don't click on or run random shit, and don't let email run scripts... I have clients with setups 15+ years old, infection-free, who do no more than that for security.

Someone pointed out that these 0day exploits aren't quite... that most derive from reverse-engineering the patch, then seeking unpatched machines. No patches, no cues where to look.

Comment: Re:Hardware requirements (Score 1) 641

by Reziac (#46707901) Attached to: Meet the Diehards Who Refuse To Move On From Windows XP

Someone here turned me on to this motherboard:

http://www.ibase-i.com.tw/mb80...

I got one purely for the ISA slots. It's very stable and well-mannered, tho it does need an update to handle larger HDs. (I don't really care since anymore I either run HDs as externals or off a SATA adapter card.) Company responds to support queries with a Real Human.

I have a stash of P2 and P3 motherboards/CPUs for the same reason... ISA slots, and fast enough for the purpose.

Comment: Re:The world is changing. (Score 1) 224

by Reziac (#46707735) Attached to: Online Skim Reading Is Taking Over the Human Brain

I max out at about 800wpm with full comprehension, but can skim much faster -- a skill learned in high school history class, where the trick was to pick out the highlights from the wall of uninspired text. Conversely, I may read a book with a leisurely pace at a similarly relaxed speed. And yeah, I've found that people who read slowly do not grok that some people can process print that fast.

Comment: Re:Pipeline ruptures are extremely common. (Score 1) 163

by Reziac (#46686221) Attached to: It's Time To Plug the Loopholes In Pipeline Regulation

And how much of a problem are these accidents as a percentage of the whole? I'd guess it's some miniscule fraction of a percent, relatively safe compared to, say, medicine or automobiles or bathtubs. But like a plane crash (also a rare risk) it's spectacular compared to everyday risks.

Also, let's not forget that a great many of today's housing developments grew up AFTER the pipeline or refinery or whatever nasty-NIMBY. Who is really liable when you move in next door to a known potential risk?

Every nonzero finite dimensional inner product space has an orthonormal basis. It makes sense, when you don't think about it.

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