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Comment: Use people you trust (Score 1) 381

by Tharsis (#45896541) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How To Protect Your Passwords From Amnesia?

Since your assumption is that you're forgetting things you must assume you'll forget everything, including the fact that you have something to access with a password or the means with which to recover the password. Therefore someone has to come to you with the information without any action from your side, judge that you're enough "yourself" to give you access to your own passwords, and then give the information.
If you do not trust a single person with this information the question becomes:

How can you give multiple people parts of the information such that the chance that they can reconstruct it is minimal?

Comment: Re:Willing but able? (Score 1) 540

by Tharsis (#40467077) Attached to: Ask Bas Lansdorp About Going to Mars, One Way

You have a very good point and I'm sorry for you that you will not be able to join, but I think you misunderstand their goal. Their goal is to actually send a small group of people that can work in harmony and succeed in getting and living there. In that view I think their selection criteria would not be based on possibilities of romance, how people look, and ethnicities. Unlike other reality shows they will strive to reduce disharmony and conflict among the group, that will only lead to failure.
I think the only limitations that would hold them back from selecting you are practical. You can probably not be too picky on your diet overthere, and also any special equipment you might need (eg wheel chair) will be a big problem.

Software

+ - ESA announces the Summer of Code In Space 2012->

Submitted by juli1
juli1 (993569) writes "The European Space Agency announced the second edition of the Summer Of Code In Space (SOCIS2012), a similar initiative to the Google Summer of Code but more related to space software. The goal is to support students in contributing to Open-Source projects that are connected to the space domain. Students' contribution is reviewed by selected mentoring organizations and likely reversed to the main branch of each project.

According to the time-line, mentoring organizations can apply now and accepted students would start their projects beginning of August and write code until October. Upon successful completion of the program, students will receive 4000 euros."

Link to Original Source

+ - Nokia to Cut 10,000 Jobs and Close 3 Facilities

Submitted by parallel_prankster
parallel_prankster (1455313) writes "NY Times reports that Nokia said on Thursday that it would slash 10,000 jobs, or 19 percent of its work force, by the end of 2013 as part of an emergency overhaul that includes closing research centers and a factory in Germany, Canada and Finland, and the departures of three senior executives.

The company also warned investors that its loss was likely to be greater in the second quarter, which ends June 30, than it was in the first, and that the negative effects of its transition to a Windows-based smartphone business would continue into the third quarter.Nokia, based in Espoo, Finland, posted a loss of €929 million, or $1.2 billion, in the first quarter as sales plummeted 29 percent. Once the undisputed global leader in the mobile phone business, Nokia has been outcompeted by Apple, as well as by Samsung and other makers of handsets running Google’s Android operating system."
Medicine

+ - Nanotechnology to Deliver Drugs Direct to Cancer Cells->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "In the field of oncology, scientists have been able to show that nanoparticles can be introduced into cancer cells.

This article looks at how Northwestern University in Chicago have been the first to develop a simple, specialised nanoparticle which can deliver a drug directly to a cancer cell's nucleus, which is an important feature for effective treatment.

Additionally Experts at Rice University and Texas Medical Center have found that a chemotherapy drug delivered into cancer cells with plasmonic nanobubbles is 30 times more lethal to cancer cells than traditional drug treatment."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:The two I legally need to have to go about my d (Score 3, Informative) 380

by Tharsis (#40307989) Attached to: I typically carry X many forms of photo ID; X =

I can think of a few more reasons why it's BS:
1) it assumes that there is such a thing as universal evil. The real world is not so black and white. It's not even shades of grey.
2) it shows an utter unwillingness to see things from another perspective. (My evil is not your evil)
3) It's a bully statement. Negotiation is not domination.
4) It induces a weapons race (communists are evil!)

Comment: Re:Free country? (Score 0, Offtopic) 152

by Tharsis (#33881014) Attached to: Dutch Hotels Must Register As ISPs

Could you please explain which particular set of freedoms are required to make a country "free"?
Every country needs restrictions on freedom, otherwise everybody could do anything, there'd be no crime.
Whether you can live with those restrictions mostly depends on you and your values.
But don't forget that a lot of restrictions are desirable. Would you care to live in country where you are allowed to steal?

You can't throw "freedom" around without explaining what you actually mean. Freedom means different things in different cultures.

Comment: Multiple exams (Score 1) 870

by Tharsis (#33571456) Attached to: Preventing Networked Gizmo Use During Exams?

One way to prevent cheating is to make sure there is nothing to cheat, or to add a risk of cheating the wrong answers. Make several versions of your exam, or different exams altogether (you probably have those already). You don't need an ultimate answer to prevent cheating, you just need to increase the risk of failure sufficiently that the majority will not cheat.

Comment: Re:Not really it doesn't. (Score 2, Interesting) 172

by Tharsis (#30819844) Attached to: Google To Suspend Mobile Phone Launch In China

It's actually a pretty scary idea that google thinks it has enough power to change the governing policy of one of the biggest countries in the world.

This has not been shown to be the case. I'm sorry, but you can't have it both ways. Does Google put their foot down, or don't they? Do they give into the local laws and help oppress, or don't they? I don't see Google invading China with corporate armies, or hacking Chinese government systems, or subverting Chinese government employees here.

Well, I'm sorry, but if a company wants to operate in a country, it should abide by its laws, otherwise it's a criminal organization. It's not up to that company to change the government, it's up to the people that live in the country. There are more ways than those you mention for a company to force its wishes on a government (MS has used some).
I'm not saying I agree with what China is doing. But I also don't think it a good idea to force my ideas of freedom on them, if there's anything that causes chaos in a country it's sudden changes like that. I'd say China has been doing a pretty good job of slowly creating a more free country.

A country cannot work if they have to change their laws according to the wishes of a company.

No, but a company is made up of people, and in a democracy, those people have a say in how the country is run, along with every other citizen. Perhaps you don't live in a country with a democratic form of government, or you don't value the freedom of each voice being heard. However, in the United States, we do value these things.

I do value these things (and I do live in a democratic country) but I do not have the wisdom to say that it is better than all other forms of government, and neither do you unless you've lived in them. Basically what I'm saying is that it should be the people that change a country, not an outside company. Where's the democracy in an outside company forcing a change.

But in the end it still comes down to one question: should Google support China's repressive government, or not? If you condemn them either way, you are a hypocrite. And you'll have to make a really, really good case for "should support repression" as being "not evil".

Stop thinking so binary. Just because one is "evil" doesn't mean the other is "good". There are a lot more options than the ones you mention.

Comment: Re:"Don't be evil" is put to the test (Score 3, Insightful) 172

by Tharsis (#30818994) Attached to: Google To Suspend Mobile Phone Launch In China

That really depends on your point of view. It's actually a pretty scary idea that google thinks it has enough power to change the governing policy of one of the biggest countries in the world. Sure, to our (western) point of view it makes a lot of sense to try to give citizens the freedom to express their opinion, but they ARE trying to infringe upon the sovereignty of a country. A country cannot work if they have to change their laws according to the wishes of a company.
I cannot vote for Google, so they do not rule.

I use technology in order to hate it more properly. -- Nam June Paik

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