Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:If you've nothing to hide... (Score 5, Insightful) 878

by Teux (#33043774) Attached to: Facing 16 Years In Prison For Videotaping Police

I've always found the "to protect and serve" on police cars to be intensely ironic considering that they do neither.

Modern police serve mainly to try to keep the peace and to clean up after crimes. They come into most situations and arrest whoever is causing the most ruckus or is most uncooperative. They act like frustrated, tired parents who just want some quiet when they come home from work. Right and wrong mean a lot less then just getting everyone out of their hair.

Then comes the counselor act, where the cops show up after a crime. They assure everyone the that criminal will be caught (rare unless they are caught in the act of another crime) and clean up the mess a bit after pretending to care for a bit.

I'm sure my contempt for the police shows in this post, but I really do believe that as a whole we need more control of the people we allow to walk among us with guns.

Google

Google Tells Users To Drop IE6 426

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the my-mom-still-won't-do-it dept.
Kelly writes "Google is now urging Gmail users to drop Internet Explorer 6 (IE6) in favor of Firefox or Chrome. Google recently removed Firefox from the Google Pack bundle, replaced it with Chrome, then added a direct download link for Chrome on Google and YouTube. Google's decision to list IE6 as an unsupported Gmail browser does not affect just consumers: Tens of thousands of small- and mid-sized businesses that run Google Apps hosted services may dump IE6 as well. What's especially interesting is the fact that Mozilla is picking up two out of three browser users that Microsoft surrenders."
Privacy

Using Speed Cameras To Send Tickets To Your Enemies 898

Posted by kdawson
from the ticket-me-elmo dept.
High school students in Maryland are using speed cameras to get back at their perceived enemies, and even teachers. The students duplicate the victim's license plate on glossy paper using a laser printer, tape it over their own plate, then speed past a newly installed speed camera. The victim gets a $40 ticket in the mail days later, without any humans ever having been involved in the ticketing process. A blog dedicated to driving and politics adds that a similar, if darker, practice has taken hold in England, where bad guys cruise the streets looking for a car similar to their own. They then duplicate its plates in a more durable form, and thereafter drive around with little fear of trouble from the police.
Announcements

+ - Digital mutiny: 2,000 page iraq leak->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Looks like them wikileaks guys are finally putting something out there.

from the site:

This spectacular 2,000 page US military leak consists of the names, group structure and equipment registers of all units in Iraq with US army equipment . It exposes secretive document exploitation centers, detainee operations, elements of the State Department, Air Force, Navy and Marines units, the Iraqi police and coalition forces from Poland, Denmark, Ukraine, Latvia, Slovakia, Romania, Armenia, Kazakhstan and El Salvador. The material represents nearly the entire order of battle for US forces in Iraq and is the first public revelation of many of the military units described. Among other matters it shows that the United States has violated the Chemical Weapons Convention."

Link to Original Source
Security

New Password Recovery Technique Uses CPU and GPU Together 264

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the brute-force-just-means-get-a-bigger-hammer dept.
BaCa writes to mention that a new hardware/software combination has been created by a company called ElcomSoft that will reportedly allow cryptography professionals to build cheap PCs that work like supercomputers for the specific task of retrieving lost passwords. Utilizing a combination of the CPU and the GPU the task of brute forcing a password may be reduced by as much as a factor of 25. "Until recently, graphic cards' GPUs couldn't be used for applications such as password recovery. Older graphics chips could only perform floating-point calculations, and most cryptography algorithms require fixed-point mathematics. Today's chips can process fixed-point calculations. And with as much as 1.5 Gb of onboard video memory and up to 128 processing units, these powerful GPU chips are much more effective than CPUs in performing many of these calculations."
Space

Could Black Holes Be Portals to Other Universes? 277

Posted by Zonk
from the oh-sliders-you've-taught-us-so-much dept.
David Shiga writes "Astronomers have identified many objects out there that they think are black holes. But could they be portals to other universes called wormholes, instead? According to a new study by a pair of physicists, we wouldn't be able to tell the difference. They have discovered that wormholes with the right shape would look identical to black holes from the outside. But while a trip into a black hole would mean certain death, a wormhole might spit you out into a parallel universe with its own stars and planets. Exotic effects from quantum physics might produce wormholes naturally from collapsing stars, one of the physicist says, and they might even be produced in future particle accelerator experiments."
Databases

+ - Freebase: a creative commons db of facts

Submitted by
yppiz
yppiz writes "My company, Metaweb, just announced Freebase, a Creative Commons licensed database of facts. The site is young, so for now, our alpha is by invitation, but Tim O'Reilly has posted his insights and some screenshots. There's also a writeup in the New York Times.

John Markoff, NYT:

A new company founded by a longtime technologist is setting out to create a vast public database intended to be read by computers rather than people, paving the way for a more automated Internet in which machines will routinely share information.
"
Music

+ - NetTunes set to redefine music 'sharing'

Submitted by
kaizendojo
kaizendojo writes "Robert X. Cringely writes in this week's Pulpit about a music sharing site that is based in part on an idea he had years ago, and then revisted in a later article. "The new service is called NetTunes (it's in this week's links) and was built, according to lead developer Robert Stromberg, by combining my ideas with his. The major difference between NetTunes and Snapster is that while Snapster was based on joint ownership of the music, NetTunes is based on a music-lending model. There is nothing in U.S. copyright law that says you can't lend your DVD or CD to a friend or neighbor to watch or listen to. They aren't supposed to copy it, of course, but the concept doesn't preclude multiple physical copies (backups are allowed, remember, as is redeployment on other media like tapes or iPods) so much as multiple simultaneous USES of the content. So if you lend your copy of Led Zeppelin IV to some buddy with a hot date, you'd better not play it that evening at your home, that is unless you bought a second physical copy of the record or CD. NetTunes virtualizes the whole music-lending function. You join the service, then either upload your music just like to any other music locker service, or you just register the albums and songs you own and link to them through NetTunes in much the same way that you did in the pirate heyday of Napster, the original P2P music-sharing sensation." Sounds interesting, but how long will this be stay under the RIAA's radar? My guess would be they are already preparing legal briefs as we speak..."
Education

+ - BGSU Prof Responds About Academic Freedom Article

Submitted by
C.Rathsack
C.Rathsack writes "Dr. Paul Cesarini, an assistant professor in the Visual Communication & Technology Education department at Bowling Green State University, began a discussion that we wanted to continue on Interact at the Center. The original article, Caught in the Network, from the Chronicle of Higher Education, began a discussion on academic freedom, IT controls and limits, and the fine balance between the two. Paul was kind enough to respond to some of the comments and questions he has received as well as reflect his experiences over the past few weeks:

I appreciate how many of you read my article, commented on it in various online venues, and linked to it so that others might read it... (more) If anyone else has some specific questions or comments about my article, I would love to hear them. ~Paul
See Paul's full response here: Interact at the Center"
Privacy

+ - FBI Admits Abuse of Patriot Act to Obtain Info

Submitted by SydShamino
SydShamino (547793) writes "CNN, the Associated Press and others are reporting that an independent audit of the FBI revealed "serious misuse" of power to acquire private information granted in the Patriot Act. FBI Director Robert Mueller has accepted responsibility for problems and says they are being corrected, but Congress has already called for hearings. There's no word yet on criminal charges against anyone in the FBI who might have broken the law."
United States

+ - Congressman: colleges are nests of piracy

Submitted by Prescott
Prescott (666) writes "Hollywood's congressman, Rep. Howard Berman of California, has announced that his subcomittee will be accelerating its hearings on piracy at American colleges. More troubling, he is getting ready to go after what he is calling the 'hypocrisy' of American colleges and Universities. 'Unfortunately, many schools have turned a blind eye to piracy,' Berman said. 'I don't doubt that there are legitimate issues that universities must grapple with, including privacy and cost concerns. However, when a university such as Purdue tells the AP that it rarely even notifies students accused by the RIAA because it is too much trouble to track down alleged offenders — such inaction is unacceptable.'"
Operating Systems

Virtualization Is Not All Roses 214

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the watch-out-for-those-thorns dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Vendors and magazines are all over virtualization like a rash, like it is the Saviour for IT-kind. Not always, writes analyst Andi Mann in Computerworld." I've found that when it works, it's really cool, but it does add a layer of complexity that wasn't there before. Then again, having a disk image be a 'machine' is amazingly useful sometimes.

"Let every man teach his son, teach his daughter, that labor is honorable." -- Robert G. Ingersoll

Working...