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Submission + - When users want malware

johnjaydk writes: How do You handle users who insists on installing malware? I'm running a nice tight ship where users can't install stuff and now I face a rebellion because I don't allow them to install malware. I can't even explain the concept of malware to them.

Submission + - When vuln disclosures are outlawed (

doperative writes: 'Legal goons from Magix AG sent a nasty gram to a researcher who goes by "Acidgen" after he reported the stack buffer overflow in the company's Music Maker 16. According to the report, Acidgen alerted Magix representatives to the bug in several emails that also included proof-of-concept code that forced the Windows calculator to open, indicating the flaw could be exploited to execute malicious code on a victim's computer.

"They misunderstood that I was getting money for doing this ... and illegally breaking into networks" link

Comment: of course the vulnerability isn't in the application but in the underlying Operating System ...

Submission + - Nottingham Uni student arrested under terriosm act ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: On May 15 2008, two university members — a student and a member of staff — were arrested under the Terrorism Act (2000) because they possessed copies of the"Al-Qaeda Training Manual" which had been downloaded from the United States Department of Justice website. An extended version of the same document is available for sale in book form on The student, a member of the university's Politics and International Relations department, was researching terrorism for his postgraduate studies and was being advised by a friend of his, who was a former student and administrative member of staff. Both men were held in police custody for six days before being released without charge.
The Terrorism Act (2000) stipulates that: "A person commits an offence if he possesses an article in circumstances which give rise to a reasonable suspicion that his possession is for a purpose connected with the commission, preparation or instigation of an act of terrorism."

The postgraduate tutor of the student at that time has submitted a paper to the British International Studies Association documenting how the university helped get these men arrested and what the university has done to cover up the story since

The Internet

Comcast Accused of Congestion By Choice 434

An anonymous reader writes "A kind soul known as Backdoor Santa has posted graphs purportedly showing traffic through TATA, one of Comcast's transit providers. The graphs of throughput for a day and month, respectively, show that Comcast chooses to run congested links rather than buy more capacity. Keeping their links full may ensure that content providers must pay to colocate within Comcast's network. The graphs also show a traffic ratio far from 1:1, which has implications for the validity of its arguments with Level (3) last month."

Sheriff's Online Database Leaks Info On Informants 185

Tootech writes with this snippet from NPR: "A Colorado sheriff's online database mistakenly revealed the identities of confidential drug informants and listed phone numbers, addresses and Social Security numbers of suspects, victims and others interviewed during criminal investigations, authorities said. The breach potentially affects some 200,000 people, and Mesa County sheriff's deputies have been sifting through the database to determine who, if anyone, is in jeopardy. ... The FBI and Google Inc. are trying to determine who accessed the database, the sheriff said. Their concern: That someone may have copied it and could post it, WikiLeaks-style, on the Internet. 'The truth is, once it's been out there and on the Internet and copied, you're never going to regain total control,' Hilkey said. Thousands of pages of confidential information were vulnerable from April until Nov. 24, when someone notified authorities after finding their name on the Internet. Officials said the database was accessed from within the United States, as well as outside the country, before it was removed from the server."

Submission + - Stephen Fry and DVD Jon back USB Sniffer Project (

An anonymous reader writes: bushing and pytey of the iPhone DevTeam and Team Twiizers have created a Kickstarter project to fund the build of an open-source/open-hardware high-speed USB protocol analyzer. The board features a high-speed USB 2.0 sniffer that will help with the reverse engineering of proprietary USB hardware, the project has gained the backing from two high-profile individuals Jon Lech Johansen (DVD Jon) and Actor and Comedian Stephen Fry

Submission + - Encryption Cracked on NIST Certified Flash Drives (

An anonymous reader writes: USB Flash drives with hardware based AES 256-bit encryption manufactured by Kingston, SanDisk and Verbatim have reportedly been cracked by security firm SySS. These drives are advertised to meet security standards suitable for use with sensitive US Government data (unclassified, of course) as emphasized by the FIPS 140-2 Level 2 certificate issued by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). It looks likes the Windows based password entry program always sends the same character string to the drive after performing various crypto operations.

Submission + - Five more exoplanets discovered (

Arvisp writes: New trove of data from the telescope named Kepler has also turned up space oddities that make astronomers wonder what exactly they're looking at.
One of the five planets announced by William J. Borucki, the top scientist for the telescope, is so fluffy that "it has the density of Styrofoam,"

Submission + - Firefox in Parallel - A Pre-Release Version (

clickbanklib writes: While Chrome and Internet Explorer 8 support multi-threading (running on different processors), Firefox still lacks it in the official version. Support for multiple processors in Firefox is in the works and the author tested a pre-release version of Firefox that loads different tabs in parallel. In this post he show some of the results. Among his conclusions is that the javascript engine is much faster than in previous version.

Submission + - SPAM: Core i5 and i3 CPUs With On-Chip GPUs Launched

MojoKid writes: "Intel has officially launched their new Core i5 and Core i3 lineup of Arrandale and Clarkdale processors today, for mobile and desktop platforms respectively. Like Intel's recent release of the Pinetrail platform for netbooks, new Arrandale and Clarkdale processors combine both an integrated memory controller (DDR3) and GPU (graphics processor) on the same package as the main processor. Though it's not a monolithic device, but is built upon multi-chip module packaging, it does allow these primary functional blocks to coexist in a single chip footprint or socket. In addition, Intel beefed up their graphics core and it appears that the new Intel GMA HD integrated graphics engine offers solid HD video performance and even a bit of light gaming capability."
Link to Original Source

Submission + - CIA suffers highest death toll in 30 years. ( 1

reporter writes: The "Wall Street Journal" (WSJ) has just published a report detailing the context of the recent tragedy in Afghanistan. An Afghan whom the CIA officials at Base Chapman considered an informant was really a supporter of the Taliban. The Afghan was loaded with explosives when he passed the initial checkpoint to enter Base Chapman. When he was in the vicinity of several CIA officers, he donated his explosives and killed 7 of them.

The CIA team at Base Chapman had not been following established guidelines for screening visitors. The aim was to not offend informants who were risking life and limb to provide valuable information to the CIA. This risky method of dealing with visitors relied on intuitively trusting (i. e., guessing) that a visitor is not a supporter of the Taliban.

Trust is a concept that works in the West, but trust does not work when you are dealing with people who still live in the 2nd century.


Vegetative Patients Can Still Learn 159

enigma48 writes to mention that a collaborative study between the Universities of Buenos Aires and Cambridge have demonstrated that individuals in a vegetative state can still learn and demonstrate at least a partial consciousness. Their findings are reported in a recent online edition of Nature Neuroscience. "It is the first time that scientists have tested whether patients in vegetative and minimally conscious states can learn. By establishing that they can, it is believed that this simple test will enable practitioners to assess the patient's consciousness without the need of imaging. The abstract is also available in the advance issue of Nature."

Asus Plans Dual-Display E-Reader 199

adeelarshad82 writes "Yet more confirmation has emerged that Asus plans its own e-book reader. An Asus representative in the UK appears to have confirmed this, with the additional details that there may be a value-priced as well as a premium version. The article guesses at the price point for the low-end model — around £100 ($192). Unlike current e-book readers, which take the form of a single flat screen, the Asus device has a hinged spine, like a printed book. This, in theory, enables its owner to read an e-book much like a normal book, using the touchscreen to 'turn' the pages from one screen to the next. Asus showed off a prototype of the device at the CeBIT trade show in March." Reader NeverBotedBush adds, "Asus's e-reader will likely have color touch screens, a speaker, a webcam, and a microphone, along with the capability to make inexpensive Skype calls." The color screen rules out using E Ink technology, so long battery life seems to be unlikely.

Attractive Women Make Men Temporarily Stupid 652

Ponca City, We love you writes "The Telegraph reports that men who spend even a few minutes in the company of an attractive woman perform less well in tests designed to measure brain function than those who chat to someone they do not find attractive. This leads to speculation that men use up so much of their brain function or 'cognitive resources' trying to impress beautiful women, they have little left for other tasks. Psychologists at Radboud University in The Netherlands carried out the study after one of them was so struck on impressing an attractive woman he had never met before, that he could not remember his address when she asked him where he lived. Researchers recruited 40 male heterosexual students and had each one perform a standard memory test. The volunteers then spent seven minutes chatting to male or female members of the research team before repeating the test. The results showed that men were slower and less accurate after trying to impress the women. The more they fancied them, the worse their score."

Alan Turing Apology Campaign Grows 653

chrb writes "Several British news sources have recently reported on the growing campaign that calls for an apology to Alan Turing for his persecution by the British government. The petition to the Prime Minister was started by John Graham-Cumming, who has also written to the Queen requesting a Knighthood for Turing, but admits that a pardon is 'unlikely,' saying, 'The most important thing to me is that people hear about Alan Turing and realize his incredible impact on the modern world, and how terrible the impact of prejudice was on him.'"

ASHes to ASHes, DOS to DOS.