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Comment: Re:Furloughed workers (Score 1) 346

by TemporalBeing (#45373149) Attached to: "War Room" Notes Describe IT Chaos At Healthcare.gov

Pretty sure the military is our biggest spending item. Especially over the last 30 years that has seen our debt go from $1T to $16T.

Ironically, every Republican president since 1980 has at least doubled the national debt.

Reagan - from $1T to $3T Bush Sr - from $3T to $6T Bush Jr - from $5T to $11T

But somehow Democrats are the tax & spend party. Which is actually fiscally responsible from a government point of view.

Sources please. From what I am aware, Obama entered office with around $8T in debt, not $11T. Even so, don't look at the timeline (1980 to 2008) or the amounts. You also conveniently skipped Clinton who had a full Republican congress nearly his entire 8 years in office.

Comment: Re:It's a shame homophobephobes won't see it (Score 1) 732

by TemporalBeing (#45372773) Attached to: Movie Review: <em>Ender's Game</em>

I couldn't be less interested in debating religion here. I only bring up what Christ taught on the subject because Card professes to be a Christian, making it relevant to the topic at hand. If you want to get into a deep philosophical debate, this is the wrong venue.

Card is a Mormon...for him Christ is not the Christian Savior or Jewish Messiah, but just another prophet,

Comment: Re:Hitchhiker's Guide (Score 1) 732

by TemporalBeing (#45372731) Attached to: Movie Review: <em>Ender's Game</em>

I saw The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo first (US version), and it was awesome. And the book was, too. I am holding off reading the second book until the movie because you can only see the story first once, and I want that to be the movie.

go see the non-US versions. far better and very accurate to the books.

Comment: Re:other compilers (Score 1) 196

by TemporalBeing (#45372197) Attached to: Speed Test: Comparing Intel C++, GNU C++, and LLVM Clang Compilers

I thought that was something people used back when MS-DOS was a popular OS was not even aware the product still existed.

I am talking about Watcom C++ of course.

It was open sourced some time ago. Now it supports Linux (to some extent) and some other CPU architectures. It can still make DOS/4GW exes, though. Ahh, nostalgia.

As someone that has maintained Watcom C/C++ code, the Watcom and OpenWatcom are slightly different and code needs porting from Watcom to OpenWatcom. How much I don't know...I just know that our code needed quite a bit of work to do that. Would have been nice if we did...but no one wanted to.

Comment: Re:Measuring pebbles (Score 1) 196

by TemporalBeing (#45372163) Attached to: Speed Test: Comparing Intel C++, GNU C++, and LLVM Clang Compilers

First off, why wasn't Microsoft's C++ compiler included in this? That's the one we use at work, so that's the one I'd really like compared to all those others. Are we the only ones still using it or something?

Probably because it doesn't run on Linux, and one of the few compilers that is not multi-platform.

Comment: Re: Passwords are property of the employer (Score 1) 599

by TemporalBeing (#45372067) Attached to: Withhold Passwords From Your Employer, Go To Jail?

it is absolutely unforgivable to allow a system design allowing for single authority.

Every OS I can think of - Windows, Linux, MacOS, Solaris and every descendent of Unix - has a single root account, with a single root password, which can change every other password on the system. The tablet/phone OSes (iOS and Android) are similar but worse - they give administration privileges to the one and only *user* account, with an optional-and-rarely-set password, and completely block the ability to log in as root.

Got any examples of a system design that does NOT allow for a single authority?

When you get into routers, etc the OS quite quickly comes down to 1 user - the root user. If you're lucky, it'll recognize several but then it'll usually authenticate against another source (e.g. LDAP, AD, Kerberos, etc). You're basically thinking of user-facing devices (e.g. PCs) and servers, not the backend infrastructure that connects it all.

Comment: Re:Passwords are property of the employer (Score 1) 599

by TemporalBeing (#45372013) Attached to: Withhold Passwords From Your Employer, Go To Jail?

I'm not saying what Terry did was right/wrong, but if they didn't have procedures/process in place, then it's there own fault a cocky sys admin grabbed them by the cohones.

Agreed. They should have at least asked for the password prior to firing him.

On a separate note, would you really re-grant sysadmin access to someone that wasn't "pleasant" about handing over the keys?

On a 1-day contract that is explicit about being for the sole purpose of providing the password(s) to another employee so that employee can then access and change the password? Yes, but no $1k/day - probably $100/hr, and only keep them around long enough to get and verify the passwords. Perhaps 1-2 hours per day for several days as needed by the other employee, but no - they would not be allowed to touch any equipment. If they needed to touch type for the password, a separate (controlled) system would be provided for them to do so into "notepad" (or equivalent).

Comment: Re:logic (Score 1) 299

by TemporalBeing (#44973123) Attached to: How Early Should Kids Learn To Code?

learning logic skills should be well in advance of coding. i do think our society waits too late on that. that alone could improve lots of things out side of computer programming as well.

I learned Logo in 4th grade. We mostly had fun with it by making the turtle wrap the screen and change colors. It certainly helped produce an interest.

According to Linus Torvald's book "Just for Fun", he learned to program by typing in his grandfather's assembly code and moving on from there.

So all-in-all, I don't think logic skills are necessary to start learning to program, but they should at least be developed along side it. Really what you need to do is foster an interest in programming using some tool that kids like - whether Logo or a OLPC or Arduino or Lego Robotics or whatever. Spark the interest and it'll go on its own from there - and they'll get into the logic stuff (Algebra, Boolean Algebra, Calculus, etc) on their own as they realize the need.

Comment: Re:massless photons vs black hole (Score 1) 175

by TemporalBeing (#44971867) Attached to: Scientists Create New "Lightsaber-Like" Form of Matter

Photons at rest could then have a Really (really really ...) small mass ...

Well, theoretically (and only theoretically) photons could have a gigantive rest mass that is 100% converted to energy when in motion. The problem we normally face is that we cannot convert (or think of how to convert) 100% to 100% energy in a manner required to do that - t0 at rest, t1 in motion, a=c over t0 to t1 and (t1-t0) is nearly zero (e.g. 0.000.....0001 or 1*10^-infinity).

Comment: Re:Nobody in the business cares (Score 1) 144

by TemporalBeing (#44970467) Attached to: A Timely Revision of Elop's "Burning Platform" Memo

Damn it people, so much emotional attachment to a company because it once had the distinction to cock up an OSS-based project.

That has nothing to do with my statement. My statement was purely that they could in fact go back to MeeGo/Maemo if they wanted. There's nothing preventing that.

Please get it through your heads: Nokia shareholders' objectives do not include supporting the cause of Linux, or Qt, or whatever. It is, plainly, to make money. They are fucking happy to see something sellworthy made out of the dysfunctional wreck that Nokia was in 2010.

The objective of any business is to make money. Whether or not that includes Linux or Qt or whatever - even Microsoft Windows - is different matter based on what products and features the company thinks they can sell to others (corporate or not) to make money. Often the case is more aligning to Linux now than it is to Microsoft Windows; but as I noted that is an entirely separate issue than the comment I made pertaining to MeeGo/Maemo and Nokia's ability to continue with that platform if they so chose.

Comment: Same mistake the browser smade... (Score 1) 282

by TemporalBeing (#44964369) Attached to: Will New Red-Text Warnings Kill Casual Use of Java?
Honestly, while having users authenticate a self-signed cert in a browser did help with security, etc it also broke a lot of devices. I still cannot use my WRT54G with any modern browser aside from the default browser on Android 2.3.6; same with my newer model router with latest firmware.

And honestly the problem IS NOT the hardware I'm accessing - its the stupid browsers.

They're only going to cause the same kinds of headaches for everyone.

P.S. I'm not in favor of Java or Java Appletes, but it still seems like a bad thing given how it impacted browsers accessing valid websites with self-signed certs.

Comment: Re: It shoud have suprised no one (Score 1) 144

by TemporalBeing (#44961055) Attached to: A Timely Revision of Elop's "Burning Platform" Memo

Funny how they were still selling quite a lot of them until Elop came around.

And RIM were selling quite a lot of Blackberries until it was too late.

My point was that comparing RIM/BB and Nokia is not valid - its an apples-to-oranges comparison.

Nokia is where it is today because of Elop and numerous things he did as CEO - from declaring symbian/meego/maemo dead and their move to WP. Prior to all of that Nokia was relatively healthy and in a good position to make a transition; after those things they were not. Please take off your revisionist history glasses.

RIM/BB is where they are because they had a technical failure in their network that severely hurt their customers. Up to that point in time, they were doing extremely well. When that occurred, people realized how tied their own communications were to RIM/BB itself. I don't think people realized how centralized the RIM/BB network was until then.

FYI - All those Symbian devs and their Symbian apps had a migration path from Symbian to Maemo/MeeGo.

That's what the powerpoint said. In practice, there were... issues.

Please share what inside information you have? Having participated in the Qt mailing lists at that time ( and I still do ) there was quite a lot going on. Qt for Symbian was doing well, and people were doing Qt for various platforms - including Symbian - and recompiling to go between them. Not saying everything was perfect or that they weren't fully ready to push it out migration wise, but it was something they had - unlike the complete and utter drop of all their partners, app developers, etc for the move to WP. (I would actually have been quite surprised if it was 100% perfect.)

Also Nokia didn't have the same issue BB had in having a central network that was essential to the platform and have a major crash that took weeks to fix and caused headaches for their customers.

Nokia had another issue: being the company that allowed the N97 to be released. That was in 2009, years after iPhone was on the market. All that happened after was, in essence, karmic justice.

So what? N97 was not the N900.

The N900 is what Elop completely killed before it was released, and outsold Lumias without any issue; it was a very high demand phone that Nokia under Elop decided they would only do a limited number of because they were doing WP instead of MeeGo/Maemo.

In 2010 MeeGo wasn't out. It was just about to be released when Elop wrote the "burning platform" memo; and during the presentation to the press he stood up on stage and said "We're not doing this; look I have another one running Windows Phone and that is our future" - intentially sabotaging it before it even hit market.

Your time window for "just about to be released" must stretch for half a year.

The N900 was originally released with Maemo5 (presented Sept 2009, released Nov 2009), and later released with MeeGo (May 2010). Just prior to its MeeGo release, Elop did exactly as I noted.

And, I'm afraid, your description of a presentation has no basis in documented reality. It was known since February that Nokia is pivoting towards Windows Phone and everybody knew that the N9 was a dead end. Moreover, it wasn't ever meant to be a proper MeeGo device. It was fucked up by internal politics long before Elop came on stage.

Please share your inside information.

Yet, as others have pointed out, with no marketing the MeeGo Phone outsold the Lumias wherever they were both sold in the same markets - and not by small margins - by 3:1 ratios.

I'm sorry to see you believe in a myth with no credible evidence whatsoever.

What myth? It's in numerous sources backed up by financials and information from Nokia itself.

Comment: Re: It shoud have suprised no one (Score 5, Informative) 144

by TemporalBeing (#44952211) Attached to: A Timely Revision of Elop's "Burning Platform" Memo

You missed a key fact: Elop took a good brand that now had only unwanted, aging products that could no longer compete, executed the most expensive failures, and sold the rest before the marketplace killed them completely.

Funny how they were still selling quite a lot of them until Elop came around.

Had he pumped hundreds of millions of dollars into Symbian, and tried to make a go of it based on an existing loyal fan base and lots of marketing, he would have ended up EXACTLY like Blackberry -- warehouses filled with unsold phones, flat broke, and completely irrelevant in the marketplace.

FYI - All those Symbian devs and their Symbian apps had a migration path from Symbian to Maemo/MeeGo.

Also Nokia didn't have the same issue BB had in having a central network that was essential to the platform and have a major crash that took weeks to fix and caused headaches for their customers. That is really why BB fell in market share - everyone was looking for something more reliable. BB10 is a great little platform, but they have a reputation they have to fix - something that takes a long time to do and they may not be able to recover from.

At least with Microsoft owning them, they're not broke. I don't know why everyone on slashdot has remained so deluded about Nokia's potential future had Elop not taken those actions. They were not competitive, and their prospects were poor. If Symbian and Meego were as great as everyone here imagines, why weren't they crushing iPhones back in 2010?

In 2010 MeeGo wasn't out. It was just about to be released when Elop wrote the "burning platform" memo; and during the presentation to the press he stood up on stage and said "We're not doing this; look I have another one running Windows Phone and that is our future" - intentially sabotaging it before it even hit market. Yet, as others have pointed out, with no marketing the MeeGo Phone outsold the Lumias wherever they were both sold in the same markets - and not by small margins - by 3:1 ratios. Every review of the MeeGo phones compared it to the iPhone; it would have been a killer - and at the very least a very strong third, leaving everyone else to fight for fourth - had it not been for Elop.

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