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Submission + - SPAM: MIT App turns your Android Phone into a Supercomp.

liqs8143 writes: "A few people have called Google's Nexus One a "superphone," but suddenly, that nickname has taken on a whole new level of meaning.
A team of talented folks from MIT has put its head down in order to create a new Android application that can come darn close to solving complex computational problems in just a fraction of the time that it'd take a bona fide supercomputer. The goal here is to let researchers and scientists convert to Google's mobile OS, but if you aren't falling for that one, it's also designed to"let engineers perform complicated calculations in the field, and to better control systems for vehicles or robotic systems.""

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Submission + - Scientists Uncover Free-Floating, Starless Planets (ibtimes.com)

gabbo529 writes: "A group of researchers have discovered a new class of planets in the Milky Way Galaxy and they don't have an orbital home. According to a study done by a group of international researchers, the planets are dark, isolated Jupiter-mass bodies located far away from any host star. The researchers, led by Takahiro Sumi of Osaka University, say the planets were most likely ejected from developing planetary systems. The researchers' study will appear as part of a paper appearing in the May 19th issue of the journal Nature."

Submission + - Kepler May Uncover Numerous Ring Worlds (discovery.com)

astroengine writes: "According to a new publication, NASA's Kepler exoplanet hunting space telescope may soon start discovering Saturn-like ringed alien worlds. So far, none have been positively identified as Kepler has only detected exoplanets orbiting close to their parent stars; if these exoplanets have rings, they are most likely to have rings facing edge-on to their orbits, so making them nearly impossible to detect. As more distant-orbiting exoplanets are detected, there's more likelihood ringed worlds will be tilted, allowing Kepler to see them. And astronomers know what they're looking for..."

Why did the Roman Empire collapse? What is the Latin for office automation?