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Comment Re:Cannonical is just trolling us (Score 1) 984

The old way to define a kilobyte was introduced to make life easier for programmers, but nowadays the size of storage is going up in GB and TB and maybe to PB very soon. And most people using computers are not geeks, they are normal people which understand kilo,mega,giga etc. in the SI way. And why should computer technicians use the prefixes differently than any other science? Just because RAM is packed in base-2 units? That makes no sense. In 10 years nobody will care any longer about kibi.

Comment Re:yep... (Score 1) 778

I wouldn't be surprised if the phone manufacturers know that they can get away with using crappy crystal oscillators and just re-syncing the time regularly.

Well, yes, but they already get a packet from the tower every minute or so, which already has the time in it.

I suspect most of the inaccuracy in your phone is, in fact, inaccuracy in cell towers.

Comment Re:Honestly (Score 1) 157

Reading through the comments, it stroke me the same. Van Eck phreaking can't be a problem because it provides literally the same information as exit polls.

... it's only a problem if you are then able to associate votes with individuals.

What again is not a problem if one votes in densely populated area: emission from many voting machines would mix making it hard to differentiate a vote on a single machine.

It might be the problem with VIPs. But for the case one can really go extra mile and install proper shielding.

Comment Re:The "I Blame The Government" Excuse (Score 2, Insightful) 1078

If you used the machine for a litterbox, or used it outdoors in the rain and the damp weather - both of which may lead to environmentally caused points of failure - I think that is abusing the warranty.

Please explain which of those is equivalent to smoking while using the computer, and how. The computer is not a litterbox, so there's no reason why it should be covered under warranty if used as such. In addition, the computer's specifications include the allowable humidity range in most cases; if you don't exceed it, there is no grounds for denying you warranty coverage on that basis. Computers do not include specifications for dust, smoke, &c, so there is no grounds for denying warranty coverage on that basis.

Comment Re:clue for the non-iphone-user (Score 1) 268

There are lots of things that I can afford but choose not to buy. It doesn't mean that no effort went into producing them, it means that their value to me is lower than their cost.

I agree. And then you even forget the opportunity costs. Even if the value of the "thing" you're considering buying is larger than its cost, you can only spend the money once. Thus, you buy the "thing" that has the highest value for the price you pay.

Comment Re:Where is second life big? (Score 1) 187

SL is about as competently developed as it can be.

This is completely false. This isn't about content. This is about the game engine (that which is used to navigate the world) and about the content creation tools. Oh wait, they're the same thing, and they both suck. The performance of the game engine is pathetic at best, for example. The server is not at all good about sending you RELEVANT network traffic first/at the expense of unimportant stuff, so when you get into a highly congested area the game becomes utterly unresponsive. Need I go on? SL is incompetent at best and while I like to see people try I also like to see them succeed.

Comment Re:As a nonsmoking apple fan (Score 1) 1078

I'm insulted, and appalled. What is next, refusing service if you have ( legal ) things they don't approve of on your drive ( like porn? )

That's not "next", that's "now". Try getting support on an iPhone where you've installed software that hasn't been specifically approved for you to use by Apple.

The walled garden sure is beautiful, but there are guards everywhere.

Comment Re:I have no problem believing MS this time... (Score 1) 450

All I can say is, if I was a completely amoral security agency specialising in computers, and I got called in to work on the code for the world's most common OS brand - as used by many in the Chinese government - I'd stick a back door in there before I said hello to the dude in the office next to mine.

That might be true, but I think you give the NSA too much credit for being nefarious.

Of course, the Chinese language pack would be a great place to stick a backdoor. My other thought is that Microsoft already has a huge backdoor into any system running automatic updates. It wouldn't be hard to "customize" the WSUS servers to provide a particular patch to one specific computer.

Comment Not the problem (Score 1) 208

I have been talking against the extension model for a long time.

The problem is not with the extension model. It is with the Firefox implementation of the extension model. If done properly, the browser would not be exposing an API to the plugin that is capable of doing naughty things, nor would it be exposing an API for a plugin to alter another plugin. You build a clear but limited line of communication on established browser events, but everything else is concealed from the plugin.

Comment Re:Google good, Apple bad ... (Score 1) 664

But please remember that Google has wrangled a monopoly on the scanning and supplying of out of print books. It's got a few limitations, but it's basically a monopoly.

Now I realise they have some agreement with international author's associations, but I have not heard that this are exclusive contracts. In other words, everyone can still negotiate a contract with those copyright holders on scanning/republishing their works. Or have I missed something here? So is it a monopoly because they actively exclude other players, or because there are simply no other players in this market?

The biggest problem for most players of course will be the sheer scale of the project...

This restaurant was advertising breakfast any time. So I ordered french toast in the renaissance. - Steven Wright, comedian