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Submission + - First Glucose Biofuel Cell Implanted in Rat (

lucidkoan writes: A team of researchers from Joseph Fourier University in Grenoble, France recently implanted the first working glucose biofuel cell in a living animal (in this case, a rat) — a feat that proves electrical power can be harnessed from body fluids. The researchers’ device featured enzymes inside graphite discs that in turn were put inside dialysis bags. The device was implanted in the abdominal cavity of two rats, where the enzymes triggered the glucose to oxidize, ultimately generating electrical energy. Results were promising — the device managed to output 6.5 microwatts, which is slightly less than the 10 microwatts required by pacemakers.

Submission + - Volkswagen's production-ready folding EV Bik.e ( 1

ElectricSteve writes: The concept of “last few mile mobility” is one which we'll all grow accustomed to over the next decade as the world's cities become more congested and non-polluting micro mobility concepts begin to supplement other forms of transport. In the last year alone we've seen Toyota's Winglet, Honda's U3-X, Nissan's electric skis, and now Volkswagen has shown a micro mobility concept which it has dubbed the "Bik.e" – a folding electric bike with one of the most ingenious folding mechanisms we've seen. With a range of 20 kilometres (12.5 miles), the Bik.e has 20 inch wheels and folds to a footprint identical to that of a car spare tyre, enabling it to be stowed away easily. Whatsmore, the bik.e will definitely see production, and possibly even before the end of the year. VW's choice of form factor is as fascinating as its choice of a recognisable name is inspired. The Bik.e could turn out to be as important to VW as the iPod has been to Apple.

Submission + - US Navy pays $94 million to bolster space tech ( 1

coondoggie writes: The US Navy wants to jump start its space technology and this week awarded a $94.7 million contract to Orbital Sciences to do just that. The contract will require Orbital to build new satellites and systems for controlling these systems all in the name of significantly bolstering the Navy's space capabilities. According to wide-ranging contract, Orbital will undertake a range of spacecraft research, analysis, prototype development, integration, test, operation, demonstration, data processing and documentation and support activities for a number of airborne and space systems.
The Internet

Submission + - SPAM: ICANN studies secretive domain owners 1

alphadogg writes: Approximately 15 percent to 25 percent of domain names have been registered in a manner that limits the amount of personal information available to the public through WHOIS queries, according to the preliminary results of a report from ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers). Domain owners who want to limit the amount of personal information available to the public generally use a privacy or a proxy service. A privacy service lets the registrant limit the amount of personal information available via a search in a WHOIS database, while proxy services register domain names on behalf of registrants. It's the use of these two services that ICANN has surveyed, the organization said on Thursday. The main objective of the study — which was based on a random sample of 2,400 domain names registered under .com, .net, .org, .biz and .info — is to establish baseline information to inform the ICANN community on how common privacy and proxy services are.
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Submission + - MESSENGER Went Into Safe Mode Approaching Mercury (

Matt_dk writes: "The MESSENGER spacecraft went into safe mode just before its closest approach of Mercury on Sept. 29. Although the instruments were taking data as the spacecraft came near the planet during this third flyby of the mission, after going into safe mode, no further data or pictures were obtained. This means the expected science investigations from the flyby were not executed. However, as Emily Lakdawalla pointed on in the Planetary Blog, the most important purpose of this flyby was the last gravity assist that'll allow MESSENGER to enter orbit in 2011, and to that end, the flyby was a complete success."

"The most important thing in a man is not what he knows, but what he is." -- Narciso Yepes