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Comment: Re:Manager (Score 5, Insightful) 167

by Teckla (#47437475) Attached to: New Microsoft CEO Vows To Shake Up Corporate Culture

But seriously, hopefully Microsoft will benefit from him and become a bit more popular amongst nerds.

Why do you hope for that? Microsoft pretends to reinvent itself regularly, but one thing remains constant through the decades: Their goal has unswervingly been lock-in from top to bottom, while trying to nickel and dime you the whole way.

For nerds, this means locking you into their programming languages (e.g., VB or C#), or if not that, at least lock you into their APIs (so that you're as good as locked in, even if you're using C or C++). It means abandonment of entire domains that no longer suit them (look up how woefully out-of-date and ignored the C part of their C/C++ compiler is).

It means locking you into their platforms, whether that be the operating system (Windows) or the browser (Internet Explorer).

It means high prices (have you seen the prices on Windows Server and/or Microsoft Azure lately?), which is not-at-all nerd-friendly. It means guaranteed stagnation in those domains where they achieve dominance. It means product churn for the sake of profits. It means ignoring customers and forcing bad implementations on them (*cough*Metro*cough*) and then taking forever to admit it was a mistake and fix it (when is Windows 9 due out? Next year sometime?).

Just because some new-boss-same-as-the-old-boss is singing some unicorns-and-rainbows song doesn't mean the core of Microsoft is going to change. They're still after the same things they've always been after: Lock-in so severe that the pain of escape ensures most people remain slaves, and profits, profits, profits.

Comment: Re:Yes, let's tax the poor (Score 1) 619

by Teckla (#47276095) Attached to: 2 US Senators Propose 12-Cent Gas Tax Increase

12 cents won't affect me one bit. It certainly won't change my driving habits. The poor on the other hand.. well, let's just say if you're living on a fixed income and/or are already below the poverty line a nice big regressive tax might sting a little...

Well, let's think about that for a minute. Let's guess that on average filling up your tank from near empty to near full is around 13 gallons. An extra 12 cents per gallon will come to around $1.50.

If people fill up weekly, that'll be about $6/month. I don't think that'll impact the poor so very much...

Also, wealthy people tend to drive bigger vehicles, such as SUVs, and tend to commute longer distances from expensive suburbs. This will certainly cost wealthier people more money (but still probably not enough to matter).

This proposed 12 cents per gallon tax increase is peanuts, but be prepared for republicans in congress to scream and holler and shout about how it'll destroy America, cause more homosexuality, etc.

Comment: Re:Other way around (Score 1) 711

by Teckla (#47186197) Attached to: Apple Says Many Users 'Bought an Android Phone By Mistake'

Just tried it and clicking + fully maximised on every application but Chrome which for some reason has incremental sizing on it. What applications don't work for you?

OS X has what's called the Zoom button, not a Maximize button. It's supposed to size the window to best fit the content. Sometimes it does the same as Maximize does, sometimes it doesn't. Often it doesn't.

Source: My wife switched to OS X about 4 1/2 years ago. The lack of a Maximize button is, indeed, an annoyance. In OS X Mavericks, there's a full screen feature, but that's not quite the same. We frequently merely struggle a bit to manually maximize windows.

Comment: Re:Funny (Score 1) 693

by Teckla (#46750633) Attached to: The GNOME Foundation Is Running Out of Money

It's not the comments that have decreased in quality, it's the moderation. Ever since the whole beta thing people seem be less willing to spend time moderating and meta-moderating the site.

I would moderate more if I could, but (1) I browse /. on my iPad a lot, (2) I use the standard desktop view of the site on my iPad, not the mobile view, and (3) When I open stories in new tabs, it forgets that I'm logged in, thus I can't moderate.

If /. ever fixes that long-standing bug, I would be happy to try to do my part to moderate posts objectively and fairly.

Comment: Re:Because you think Google is any better? (Score 1) 218

by Teckla (#46676323) Attached to: Why No One Trusts Facebook To Power the Future

It often happens in a conversation about one thing, particularly a complex and nuanced thing, that it will bring up other similar things because they are related in some way. The resistance of some to this natural conversational process never made much sense.

I could speculate that you have a loyalty to Google that you cannot realistically expect them to reciprocate (you do know that, right?), except I've seen lots of people display this tendency who obviously had no such motivation. Some people just like to complain.

Your speculation is incorrect. Pointing out that Google may have issues in no meaningful way adds to the discussion regarding Facebook's well known issues. It's a rhetorical trick to distract from the fact that Facebook has issues.

I'm happy to discuss Facebook, Google, Apple, Microsoft, etc. But when someone clearly points out people don't trust Facebook, and for good reason, no value is added to the conversation when someone says, "But... Google!"

Linux

Ask Slashdot: Linux For Grandma? 287

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the gnu-slash-grandma dept.
First time accepted submitter BlazeMiskulin writes "With XP approaching end-of-life, I find myself in a situation that I'm guessing is common: What to do with Mom's machine (or 'grandma's machine' for the younger of you). Since a change has to be made, this seems like a good time to move to a Linux distro. My mother (82) uses her computer for e-mail and web-browsing only. I know that any distro will be able to handle her needs. I've been using Linux (Ubuntu, CentOS, and Redhat--usually with KDE interface) for about 10 years now, but I know that my preferences are quite different from hers.

I have my own ideas, but I'm curious what others think: What combination of distro and UI would you recommend for an old, basic-level user who is accustomed to the XP interface and adverse to change?"
My Grandmother seems happy running KDE on Debian.

Comment: Re:Beta Sucks (Score 1) 116

by Teckla (#46175635) Attached to: Amazon's Double-Helix Acquisition Hints At Gaming Console

By now, a professional organization would have at least acknowledged the complaints. Slashdot hasn't yet, and I'm willing to bet they never do. For a site that posts so many stories complaining about what other people do, they're remarkably slow to admit when they make a mistake.

Continue to turn the comments threads into a trash heap to drive people away. And don't forget to turn on your ad blocker. Do what you can to get their attention until they publically acknowledge that this is a mistake -- because they're not going to pay attention otherwise.

I can't even get them to give us an option to turn off fucking autorefresh. It seems rather hopeless. :(

Comment: Re:I'm sorry I'm an idiot (Score 1) 204

by Teckla (#46173425) Attached to: Gnome 3.12 Delayed To Sync With Wayland Release

Except that in that brave new future, the keypresses are navigating a round trip - see "google instant search" or just about any textbox now having "completion suggestions" which respond to each keypress...

But that's just one potential solution, it's not the fault of the technology itself. In addition, at least your key presses show up instantly, rather than making a round trip before they show up. Low latency is nice.

I stand by my assertion that equating X11 and the web is wrong, not that it stops the haters and/or the ignorant from parroting it (and getting modded up for it).

Comment: Re:I'm sorry I'm an idiot (Score 1) 204

by Teckla (#46167865) Attached to: Gnome 3.12 Delayed To Sync With Wayland Release

In the brave new future, we're now going to run our software on virtual cloud servers while the display goes over the Internet to our web browser, using Javascript instead of X11.

And the difference is enormous. HTML / CSS / JavaScript can do a lot. Even something as seemingly minor as key presses not having to navigate a round trip is a huge win.

It's popular to equate X11 and the web, but it's wrong to do so.

A morsel of genuine history is a thing so rare as to be always valuable. -- Thomas Jefferson

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