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Comment: Re:The difference between boys and girls (Score 1) 608

by Tamerlin (#48251861) Attached to: Solving the Mystery of Declining Female CS Enrollment

I am a male and I claim a fairly different nature than thou.

I also claim your notion of predestination is absolute BS.

My observations:
- Women protect their own time more than men in this industry (don't want to do as much overtime, don't want their weekends to vanish, etc) and this leads to a negative management style that penalizes healthy behaviour and thus limits women's progress
- Women take maternity leave and have kids and that hurts prospects in the high-grind world of CS
- There are a lot of poorly emotionally developed males in management roles (not all, by any means, but enough that an 'I like my coders young male and single' comment isn't a surprise out of a manager)
- Women will try to ask for an answer when stumped, guys will try to battle through (taking a long time sometimes) - the best course is usually somewhere in the middle.
- Women don't particularly love to be abused and they are less willing to put up with it from management than men (who are willing to get called some nasty things by their boss most times)

The industry is hard on developers and artists and QA people. It burns them out, treating them like disposable resources. Women are smart enough to recognize this and fewer of them want to enter this. Guys are still 'hey, neat tech!' and 'I get to code a video game/drive the space shuttle/build smartbombs/code networked scrabble/etc'. So they still throw themselves into the grinder more willingly.

Guys also respond more to challenge and to hostile bosses (that's likely deep in our genes) by trying to outperform. That same climate I believe makes a lot of women just want to leave.

So in summary, it can be a hard field on people and it is managed in ways that drive women from the field.

My cred: 18 years in software development in a lot of companies (custom software contractor much of the time in and out of companies of all sizes).

I also claim your notion of predestination is absolute BS.

While slight off topic, I agree. Predistination is an excuse for idiots to do stupid things without thinking.

My observations:
- Women protect their own time more than men in this

You nailed it. That's the biggest factor. Most people who stay in this industry are idiots who work a crazy amount of overtime and do spectacularly bad work. It's 99% machismo. And 99% of the time it's the small number of people working sane hours who are doing almost all of the work, plus fixing the idiots' constant disasters.

And like you, have many years of experience supporting this.

- Women take maternity leave and have kids and that hurts prospects in the high-grind world of CS

When I read the stories about companies offering to freeze women's embryos so that they could work more, I realized that it was tech companies basically admitting that they were sweatshops, but still trying to pretend that they were worth something. They're full of shit.

The industry is hard on developers and artists and QA people. It burns them out, treating them like disposable resources. Women are smart enough to recognize this and fewer of them want to enter this.

If I'd known that the industry would be like this, I'd have avoided it like the plague. It's a waste of time, life, money, and talent. I'm building a client base for my own start up in order to get out.

My cred: 18 years in software development in a lot of companies (custom software contractor much of the time in and out of companies of all sizes).

Mine's similar. This industry is basically dominated by seat-warming ass-lickers, not talented developers.

Comment: Re:Employers don't want employees who LOOK lazy. (Score 1) 133

by Tamerlin (#47811533) Attached to: Coffee Naps Better For Alertness Than Coffee Or Naps Alone

Depends on the employer. Maybe if you have a bunch of $11/hour monkeys working for you all they care about are butts in seats. My upper management wants to see project deadlines hit. They don't care what or how we get it done.

Most US employers want asses in seats, because they're too stupid to have learned that people working 60+ hour weeks are impeding progress rather than facilitating it.

Comment: Re:yet if we did it (Score 1) 463

a pretty standard cop thing ...I too am not a big fan of the police, but that's a hateful slander of the majority police who work hard and are good people.

If they were good people who were working hard to do their jobs, they'd be prosecuting this deputy for killing someone while breaking the law, not standing idly by while he gets off scot free while they go and ticket and arrest citizens who do the same thing.

Comment: Re: Seems good to me. (Score 1) 146

by Tamerlin (#47785889) Attached to: The American Workday, By Profession

But in the scenario I'm talking about, it's during their workday, so it's not off hour work. PST, EST, GMT, and IST can pretty much set it up so that the outgoing shift overlaps a few hours with the incoming shift. Gives you 24 hour coverage, but keeps your support from working late at night, when people are less effective and more prone to mistakes.

You're making far too much sense for an american company. What you're suggesting is logical, and therefore won't happen often.

Comment: Re: Seems good to me. (Score 1) 146

by Tamerlin (#47785523) Attached to: The American Workday, By Profession

That's one reason to have a percentage of your tech support in places where it isn't a holiday, or at least spread the time zones out through North America and Europe as to minimize the number of hours worked on the holiday itself

That's one reason to have a percentage of your tech support in places where it isn't a holiday, or at least spread the time zones out through North America and Europe as to minimize the number of hours worked on the holiday itself

Amazon actually dislikes having its staff in foreign countries, because amazon can't force their dumbasses... I mean, employees to carry pagers in foreign countries without paying a penalty anytime an employee gets an out-of-shift page.

Translation: it's harder for companies to exploit their workers outside of the us than inside, and american employees don't value themselves as much as non-american employees.

Comment: Re:9 to 5 is a myth (Score 1) 146

by Tamerlin (#47785471) Attached to: The American Workday, By Profession

Step 1: be a salaried employee.
Step 2: produce good results

Your hours will still matter, of course, but not as much.

Step 2 is obviously bullplop, since it's blindingly obvious that advancement in most american craporations is based on ass-licking rather than competence and productivity.

The sweatshop culture of america is a direct result of this.

Comment: Re: yeah (Score 1) 338

by Tamerlin (#47730299) Attached to: FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

In this case, the Republicans are opposed to regulations that would make the market more competitive, so they are using free market rhetoric to oppose free market competition. This is a shameful stance for them to take, and goes against the very principles they claim to stand for.

The real failure here isn't the corrupt, self-serving republicans. It's the sheer idiocy of the people who still vote for them in spite of the fact that the republicans are in favor of things that hurt everyone in the country, like comcrap's monopoly.

That's not to say that the democrats are any better; they get bribes from the same lobbyists as the republicans, after all. If america were a nation of educated people, neither party would get any votes.

Comment: Re:If you can observe it, it is not religion (Score 1) 105

by Tamerlin (#47416883) Attached to: Mapping a Monster Volcano

The fact that you COULD observe it, doesn't mean you actually will. Thus, until you actually observe it yourself, your knowledge of reality is still coming through faith.

That's not at all correct. It's based on reason.

When a competent scientist publishes a result, they also publish the methods that they used to achieve it. Part of the scientific process is to validate them by having 3rd parties reproduce those results. That becomes evidence.

Incredibly stupid people will claim that because it's not proven it must be wrong, but science is rarely cut and dried as the religious imbeciles want everyone to believe. When 98% of the scientific community says that there is a 90+% chance that we're right about a given assertion or hypothesis, then I believe it, because I understand the rigor of the scientific process, not because of faith in some vague, amorphous all powerful being that you really shouldn't think about because thinking about it leads to thinking and thinking leads to free will, and people with free will who can think stop believing in religious foolishness and stop giving money to the corrupt church.

Comment: Re:Classic Obama (Score 1) 211

The only thing I still find surprising about Obama is that people continued to have any respect for him after his administration's response to Deepwater Horizon. His administration facilitated BP's blatant attempts to lie to the public, break a legion of laws about their cleanup procedures, and didn't bother to take advantage of BP's history of negligence to prosecute them. The same idiot's been pandering back and forth regarding the Keystone XL pipeline even though it's useless for the economy, a climate fustercluck in the works, and given its manufacturer's track record a guaranteed ecological disaster... yet he was more interested in his reelection campaign money to do the sensible thing and kill it.

Comment: Re:Constitutional Loophole? (Score 1) 143

by Tamerlin (#46960265) Attached to: How Dumb Policies Scare Tech Giants Away From Federal Projects

For anyone else, insider trading will get arrested... if you're in the federal government, not only are you protected from punishment for violating insider trading laws, but you actually have rules and regulations in place to facilitate your insider trading.

Some of those rules and regs include not allowing federal agencies to consider company track records when reviewing bids, and some of them require giving the feds early access to contract grant information so that they can make insider trades.

Comment: Re: Our patent system is totally broken (Score 1) 152

by Tamerlin (#46960201) Attached to: USPTO Approves Amazon Patent For Taking Pictures

It's also an example of a technology company's arrogance. They're too stupid to understand that they're not breaking new ground (when I joined there, my first impression was that their technology was antique by government contracting standards), but they're arrogant enough to think that they're innovative.

Comment: Re:Startup or frat party? (Score 1) 274

by Tamerlin (#46920967) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Joining a Startup As an Older Programmer?

If the management operate like that, then they're obviously idiots, because the folks putting in the 16-hour days are the bugs, as well as the bug generators.

Naturally, most startups operate this way because "that's how it's done" even though the vast majority of the time it leads to a far higher bug rate, very poor code quality, high turnover, lengthens the time to delivery, and increases development costs in the long term.

If the code and the comments disagree, then both are probably wrong. -- Norm Schryer

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