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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 14 declined, 1 accepted (15 total, 6.67% accepted)

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: What would you actually want in a smart watch?

TWX writes: With the hype in recent Smart Watch offerings lately, no one seems to be truly happy with what's available or the capabilities in various devices. I personally want one that acts a a central hub for 3G/4G/LTE connectivity for any other kind of device that I want to use, but manufacturers now seem to be stressing more functionality on the watch itself as opposed to a modular approach. So, what do you want in a smart watch and other wearable, personal computing?

Submission + - The sorry state of FOSS documentation 1 1

TWX writes: I've been out of computers as a serious home-hobby for many years and in returning I'm aghast at the state of documentation for Open Source projects. The software itself has changed significantly in the last decade, but the documentation has failed to keep pace; most of what I'm finding applies to versions long since passed or were the exact same documents from when I dropped-out of hobbyist computing years ago. Take Lightdm on Ubuntu 14.04 for example- its entire configuration file structure has been revamped, but none of the documentation for more specialized or advanced uses of Lightdm in previous versions of Ubuntu has been updated for this latest release. It's actually harder now to configure some features than it was a decade ago.

TLDP is close to a decade out-of-date, fragmentation between distributions has grown to the point that answers from one distro won't readily apply to another, and web forums for even specific projects are full of questions without answers, or those that head off into completely unrelated discussion, or with snarky, "it's in the documentation, stupid!" responses. Where do you go for your FOSS documentation and self-help?

Submission + - Resources for a new Infrastructure Specialist

TWX writes: I've just graduated at my employer from desktop support to network infrastructure support, dealing with everything from smashed telecom receptacles to switch failures and single-mode fiber between campuses. They're interested in purchasing equipment for the job beyond the punch tool, sheetrock saw, and 10/100 Fluke Nettool that we already have. I'm looking for suggestions for tools and equipment, specifically to test gigabit copper and both single and multimode fiber. Anything else special that you think would be useful for an infrastructure technician in an organization with upwards of a hundred sites with hundreds of telecom rooms, a hundred-thousand copper horizontal runs, and miles of fiber would be much appreciated.

Submission + - Inexpensive wifi/radius for home hobbyists?

TWX writes: I'm looking to get some hands-on experience with Radius and commercial-style Wifi. I'll also soon have an environment where three or four APs will be necessary to cover everywhere, so there's a practical side as well. The trouble is, all of the equipment that I can find is prohibitively expensive, and while I expect to spend something on APs and cabling, I really would like to avoid paying for expensive commercial APs if I can avoid it. I'm looking for consumer-priced solutions, if any exist, and documentation. I know that several consumer APs are marketed as friendly to hobbyists who wish to modify them, so I'm hoping that some project for those APs to make them work with Radius is available...

With all the fancy scientists in the world, why can't they just once build a nuclear balm?

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