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Comment: Re:didn't it come from the states? (Score 1) 69

by TFGeditor (#35345114) Attached to: China Cleans Up Spam Problem

I have been firewalling China (the whole world, actually, except North American/ARIN registrants) for years on my company's servers. That alone cuts our spam load by 75-80 percent. RBLs and other measures take care of most of the rest, and server logs indicate less than 3 percent of spam gets through. That seems to be the equilibrium point between blocking spam and false positives.

Comment: Re:Really? (Score 1) 897

by TFGeditor (#34218904) Attached to: Which Language To Learn?

Programming and web development are not really my main gig. I just started this more as a favor to a very good client in my "day job" consult work.

My assembly language skills were on Data General and DEC mini computers, so do not translate very well to modern processors/languages.

Very old nerd nerd here. "I knew Alan Turing. Alan Turing was a friend of mine...."

Comment: Re:Really? (Score -1, Troll) 897

by TFGeditor (#34218536) Attached to: Which Language To Learn?

I recently had to revisit my former life in programming and "update" my language repertoire (from assembly language and FORTRAN) in order to maintain and update a client's website--written in .NET. I am slowly converting everything to PHP and Javascript because, basically, .NET sucks more ways than a French whorehouse.

+ - Microsoft Managed Networks IP/Email Routing?

Submitted by TFGeditor
TFGeditor (737839) writes "While working on a spam blacklist, I noticed a curious thing: All email sent through a Microsoft Managed Network account gets routed through the Microsoft London, Great Britain, network center (IP 94.245.64.0 — 94.245.127.255) as well as a number of other nodes for a ridiculous number of hops. It seems odd that even point-to-point intra-North American traffic would route through London. Accounts that use the Managed Network service are oblivious to this, and some of them are “name” corporations such as Administaff.

Does the formidable Slashdot collective intelligence have any idea why Microsoft does this?"
Privacy

+ - Pilots protesting new airport security

Submitted by Toe, The
Toe, The (545098) writes "Recently, TSA imposed new regulations which basically amount to: submit to a full-body scan or endure a very intrusive pat-down. In response, Allied Pilots Association president Dave Bates is suggesting that 1. the radiation from the scanners may be harmful to pilots who have to go through it repeatedly (and who are already subject to high radiation from the nature of their job), 2. pilots should instead opt for the pat-downs, and 3. pilots should not be subject to "demeaning" pat-downs in public view as they diminish the respect for the uniform. This just leaves the question of what this means to the rest of us cattle who have the nerve to use airline transportation: why should any of us be publicly humiliated as a response to terrorism?"
Censorship

+ - Extremist website in US taken down->

Submitted by mr100percent
mr100percent (57156) writes "A US-based website RevolutionMuslim.com, known for inciting violence against the creators of South Park, has been taken down on Friday after the British authorities complained of a post praising a young woman who stabbed and nearly killed a British lawmaker over his support for the Iraq war. Legal experts say that it is difficult for the government to force a site off the Internet, but the government could pressure a site operator or service provider to take it down."
Link to Original Source
Science

+ - Large Hadron Collider (LHC) generates a 'mini-Big ->

Submitted by buildslave
buildslave (875173) writes "The Large Hadron Collider has successfully created a "mini-Big Bang" by smashing together lead ions instead of protons.
The scientists working at the enormous machine on Franco-Swiss border achieved the unique conditions on 7 November.
The experiment created temperatures a million times hotter than the centre of the Sun."

Link to Original Source

Comment: The real answer (Score 1) 814

by TFGeditor (#33146860) Attached to: Sentence Spacing — 1 Space or 2?

Somewhere in the miasma of bandwidth-wasting childish prattle, someone might have answered this, but I'll go anyway.

Back in the day when print press type was set by hand, it was difficult to keep track of certain things--partly because the type was set backward. It was, for instance, difficult to distinguish between "p" an "q" when viewed backward, hence the phrase, Mind your p's and q's.

Likewise, it was difficult to discern the beginning and end of sentences, further compounded by limited font availability. Editors, too, who spent/spend all day reading/correcting manuscripts found them difficult to read after a while, so easy-to-read manuscripts received preferential treatment. Thus, doubles-spaced sentences and paragraphs became the standard.

Today, with desktop publishing and automatic text justification, extra spaces are unnecessary and actually counter productive. So, if banging out something on a typewriter, two spaces. In a word processor, one space.

(Full disclosure: I am the editor of a print magazine as well as a book author.)

A language that doesn't have everything is actually easier to program in than some that do. -- Dennis M. Ritchie

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