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Comment: Re:Drudge and other U.S. bloggers are next (Score 1) 349

by TCQuad (#44884409) Attached to: Arrested Chinese Blogger "Confesses" On State TV, Praises Censorship

Machetes work very well too.

That comparison's more than a bit disingenuous. From the link:

Chuwanga Gyang said he heard a gunshot early Sunday. He said he left his house through the back door but stopped when he realized that the attackers were shooting to herd fleeing villagers toward another group of attackers carrying machetes.

You're comparing Sandy Hook (one individual, primarily one weapon) to Dogo Nahawa (a group using machetes for killing, but wielding both guns and machetes).

Comment: Re:Version 2?? (Score 1) 294

by TCQuad (#44765919) Attached to: Surface Pro 2 and Surface 2: Now With New Kickstand!

Then around version 8, they'll force 'features' down your throat that you don't want.

"You got rid of the touch screen?"

"Yup, now it's all eye gestures! Cameras on either side record and extrapolate, figuring out what you're looking at. Simply blink your left eye to left click, your right eye to right click and both of them to go back to the new and improved desktop replacement, the home tesseract!"

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 1) 1233

by TCQuad (#44653453) Attached to: Don't Fly During Ramadan

It's called jihad.

When an entire religion blah blah blah

Among the major flaws in your argument:

He then asked, “What is your religion?”

"I’m Hindu."

He's not Muslim. He just looked like he conceivably might be due to his skin color and his decision to skip breakfast before going to the airport.

Comment: Re:CEOs are overrated (Score 3, Insightful) 692

by TCQuad (#44555369) Attached to: Larry Ellison Believes Apple Is Doomed
He personally may not think that is an essential feature, but it was certainly a selling point of the iMac. Quick connectivity served as a proxy and reinforcement of their key selling point: a simple, aesthetically pleasing and efficient machine. "Look at it, it just works. Even getting on the internet for the first time only takes a couple of minutes. How long did it take the last time you tried to do that with a PCR?"

The /. crowd may not think that's a significant selling point, but for average consumers in the AOL era? That was an interesting thought and an effective marketing technique.

Comment: Re:Sounds like BRCA1 and BRCA2 case... (Score 1) 42

by TCQuad (#44416113) Attached to: Breakthrough In Detecting DNA Mutations Could Help Treat Cancer, TB
I don't have access (I miss being able to read every paper I wanted when I was in college...), but that's not necessarily true. Multiplex qPCR (TaqMan, not SYBR) can use a number of different probes with a number of different, uniquely fluorescing fluorophores. Depending on how their method works, you may be able to adapt the protocol to accommodate these additional options. You're still looking at a small number of probes (probably ~5 before the peak overlap becomes too significant), but it's not necessarily "1".

Honestly, though, I'd flip the protocol from how it's laid out in the press release since false negatives could be deadly if you're looking at resistance mutations. Put in three non-WT versions, assay lights up if it's mutant. If you don't care about which mutation, they can share the same fluorophore. Or three non-WT and one WT with a different fluorophore so you always get a positive if the assay went correctly and a negative if there's an unexpected mutation in a different region of the sequence.

Comment: Re:Drop? (Score 1) 142

by TCQuad (#44328989) Attached to: Tar Pitch Drop Captured On Camera
Some jumping could theoretically occur on the arm that's holding up the funnel, but the position of the C-clamp on a lab stand itself shifted up slightly (some separation forms between the tar pitch c-clamp and the other arm that's steading the lab stand). That's not going to happen without human intervention.

From when the jump occurred, it appears that they lifted the clamp slightly to allow space for the next drop.

Comment: Re:Good ... (Score 2) 1073

by TCQuad (#44115359) Attached to: Supreme Court Overturns Defense of Marriage Act

That Scalia dissented means he's not looking at the right parts of the Constitution but is just being selective.

The day after SCotUS overruled the Voting Rights Act, Scalia complained that overturning DOMA "is an assertion of judicial supremacy over the people's Representatives in Congress and the Executive". I think you're being kind when you only label his arguments "selective".

Comment: Re:Who cares? The xbox one is already dead (Score 1) 463

by TCQuad (#44028871) Attached to: MS To Indie Devs: You Have a To Have a Publisher
There's still five months before the consoles' release. One segment of the market (non-gaming parents who will be giving consoles for birthdays/Christmas) has no idea any of this is going on and they wouldn't understand it regardless. As for the rest, I don't really trust the gaming community to be able to sustain this level of vitriol and/or fanboism for that long.

All Microsoft needs to do is ditch everything they said at E3 and start over. Not fixing the problems, but presenting the situation properly. It'll still be terrible, but at least some of the insane restrictions will make some logical sense with regards to what they're trying to do.
The Internet

Ship Anchor, Not Sabotaging Divers, Possibly Responsible For Outage 43

Posted by samzenpus
from the who's-to-blame dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes "This week, Egypt caught three men in the process of severing an undersea fiber-optic cable. But Telecom Egypt executive manager Mohammed el-Nawawi told the private TV network CBC that the reason for the region's slowdowns was not the alleged saboteurs — it was damage previously caused by a ship. On March 22, cable provider Seacom reported a cut in its Mediterranean cable connecting Southern and Eastern Africa, the Middle East and Asia to Europe; it later suggested that the most likely cause of the incident was a ship anchor, and that traffic was being routed around the cut, through other providers. But repairs to the cable took longer than expected, with the Seacom CEO announcing March 23 that the physical capability to connect additional capacity to services in Europe was "neither adequate nor stable enough," and that it was competing with other providers. The repairs continued through March 27, after faults were found on the restoration system; that same day, Seacom denied that the outage could have been the work of the Egyptian divers, but said that the true cause won't be known for weeks. 'We think it is unlikely that the damage to our system was caused by sabotage,' the CEO wrote in a statement. 'The reasons for this are the specific location, distance from shore, much greater depth, the presence of a large anchored vessel on the fault site which appears to be the cause of the damage and other characteristics of the event.'"

What this country needs is a dime that will buy a good five-cent bagel.

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