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Submission + - Social media is getting young people drunk (

Daniel_Stuckey writes: The Fear of Missing Out (FOMO) phenomenon is part of why people tend to get addicted to social networking and then depressed. And if you're a young, impressionable teenager, it could pressure you into making sure you, too, are happily intoxicated the next time someone snaps a group shot. That's the gist of the latest study to find that social media photos of people drinking and smoking can influence teens into partaking in the same degenerate behavior. The University of Southern California study was published online today in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Submission + - White House's Fight for Warrantless Cellphone Searches Hinges on a Flip Phone (

Daniel_Stuckey writes: Last week, the White House filed a petition asking the Supreme Court to sort out whether or not police can search a suspect's cell phone without a warrant. The Obama administration came down firmly on the side of warrantless searches, and has found leverage in its argument by focusing on a case from 2007 that features outdated technology: a flip phone.

Even as decades-old laws allow authorities loopholes for warrantless searches in myriad waysECPA's 180 day rule allowing the government to read emails is a big one—the Obama administration is arguing for even more ability to search for evidence without a warrant.

Submission + - Detecting Whether You Are on a Targeted Watchlist?

An anonymous reader writes: Yesterday, we learned that Kim Dotcom determined he was being spied on when he noticed that his latency to a few servers increased by 20 or 30 milliseconds. I have always wondered if, based on some of the slightly suspicious things I do on the Internet (download many Linux ISOs on BitTorrent and use Tor frequently), whether I am on some sort of elevated watchlist. Are there any telltale signs to look for to determine whether or not I have attracted undesirable attention on the Internet?

Submission + - How Should Slashdot Handle an NSA Incursion?

wjcofkc writes: With the fall of Lavabit and Groklaw at hand, an interesting question arises: how should Slashdot respond to the NSA if they come knocking? It is not entirely unreasonable to think that this might happen, if it hasn't already. Slashdot is after all highly trafficked by the fringes of society and is rife with seditious discussion. Courtesy of gag orders, it's difficult to know who the NSA's heavy handed dragnet operation has already ensnared. Should we expect Slashdot's editors and administrators to reflect it's powerfully counter-culture user base, and out an NSA incursion while shutting down the site, violating a gag order? Or could Dice Holdings prevent the people that run Slashdot from even knowing it was happening? These are question we should all be asking. And so I pose the question to those who administer this site: do you have a plan in case the NSA comes knocking? Is Dice Holdings in a position to keep you ignorant of NSA snooping activity? Also, to the users: how do you think Slashdot should handle their user base in response to a visit from the NSA to copy hard drives, install 'special' hardware, and lay down a gag order? If you think the question doesn't apply to us, consider that it shouldn't have applied to Groklaw either.

Submission + - Ethiopia criminalises Skype (

dryriver writes: Ethiopia’s state-owned Internet service provider, the Ethiopian Telecommunication Corporation (Ethio-Telcom), has begun performing deep-packet inspection of all Internet traffic in the country. The country’s government recently ushered in new legislation that criminalises the use of services such as Skype, Google Talk and other forms of Internet phone calling. The new law, which came into effect on 24 May, makes use of Internet voice services punishable by hefty fines and up to 15 years in prison. The official line from the government is that the move is intended to protect national security and protect the national, state-owned telecoms carrier from losing revenue to Skype and similar services; this, despite the fact that Ethiopia’s fixed-line penetration rate is the second worst in Africa (after Sierra Leone) at an estimated 1% of its 85m strong population.

Submission + - Ubuntu Touch container flip announced (

hypnosec writes: Ubuntu Touch development team has made available pre-release test images of the mobile operating system wherein the Ubuntu system launches directly instead of firing up after Android has booted. Up until now Ubuntu resided in a separate area and the OS was fired up on top of Android using ‘change root (chroot).’ This led many to claim that Ubuntu Touch was just another Android shell. The scenario has changed now and new images boot Ubuntu directly following which Android is initialized inside an LXC Container.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Hosting location recommendations in light of NSA'S PRISM & Co. 1

digisus writes: With more and more information about the extent of NSA wiretapping on the world becoming public, I consider moving away from my US-based ISP to one in Europe (or somewhere else) as one step to exercise my right to be left alone. As I would assume a few others share this interest, I am asking the slashdot community for the benefit of all of us: Which countries/jurisdictions and maybe ISPs would you recommend and why?

Submission + - $20,000 Gada prize for reinventing RepRap won (

An anonymous reader writes: South African Quentin Harley has picked up the $20,000 Gada Uplift prize for making the open source RepRap 3D printer design easier to build, cheaper to construct and — most importantly — capable of printing more of its own parts. Lots of background on Harley and his RepRap Morgan here

Submission + - Homo Erectus Was The Original Starting Pitcher (

LalenaAIP writes: "It's completely ordinary to see today's athletes throw a javelin hundreds of feet in the air or fire baseballs accurately and in excess of 90 mph dozens of times during a game. However, not every close human relative has that ability to throw, despite the great strength that many possess."

Submission + - Can Crowdfunding, Fund An Electric Car Startup? (

An anonymous reader writes: Crowdfunding has funded many great companies, but never an alternative energy company. GreenStar Motors an electric car startup located in New York City, has just launched their crowdfunding campaign. They hope to raise a startup capital amount of $20k. Will it work?

In the last 5 years we have seen over a dozen electric vehicle (EV) startups fail, miserably. So why would someone who has seen all these failures occur try to startup their on electric car company? Well, its 22-year-old founder Elvin, claims that he found solutions to the two biggest hurdles that electric cars face today. Elvin states, “The two biggest barriers with today’s electric cars are 1. Range anxiety and 2. Charging the in-car battery while living in a city with limited access to public charging stations. We figured out a way to both reduce range anxiety and charge the in-car battery while living in a city with limited to no access to public charging stations. (While some people believe the biggest hurdle with electric cars is the price we believe that once manufacturing scales go up, prices wil drop down dramatically)."

Those are some bold claims, but why a goal of $20k? That surely is not enough to fund such a capital-intensive venture. “We are seeking to raise $20K. While $20K won’t be nearly enough to fund our project, it will be enough to start the process of patenting, copyrighting, and trademarking our first few major innovations. We prefer to go the route of private capital. If possible we would like to avoid going the route of government loans like a few other electric car startups have done. We believe the government has enough to worry about. As far as we know we are the first car company to ever come out of New York. We are also the first EV company trying to raise funds through crowdfunding”

The future is electric. Lets not fight it and instead embrace it. Change is something that most people have trouble with, but change is what powered the revolutions that gave us the amazing, innovative technology we have today. Change will also be the driver behind the awesome, electric, smart, connected cars with 750+ mile range, of tomorrow. We are automotive enthusiast, we are committed to making the best cars on the road, but we need a bit of help from you. We can’t do it with out you!

Check out the crowdfunding campaign at:

(We understand that some people do not believe in global warming or dont believe its caused by humans, but whats wrong with cleaner air?!)

Submission + - Google Asks Government for More Visible National Security Requests (

Nerval's Lobster writes: In an open letter addressed to U.S. attorney general Eric Holder and FBI director Robert Mueller, Google chief legal officer David Drummond again insisted that reports of his company freely offering user data to the NSA and other agencies were untrue. “However,” he wrote, “government nondisclosure obligations regarding the number of FISA national security requests that Google receives, as well as the number of accounts covered by those requests, fuel that speculation.” In light of that, Drummond had a request of the two men: “We therefore ask you to help make it possible for Google to publish in our Transparency Report aggregate numbers of national security requests, including FISA disclosures—in terms of both the number we receive and their scope.” Apparently Google’s numbers would show “that our compliance with these requests falls far short of the claims being made.” Google, Drummond added, “has nothing to hide.” As part of its regularly updated Transparency Report, Google posts information about the National Security Letters (NSLs) it receives from the federal government; however, the government requires Google to report NSLs as a numerical range rather than an exact number. But even if Google does end up displaying more information about government requests, it doesn’t seem as if many Americans are dismayed about their privacy being invaded: according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center and The Washington Post (conducted after the Snowden story broke), concerns about terrorist threats outweigh the need for privacy. “Currently 62 [percent] say it is more important for the federal government to investigate possible terrorist threats, even if that intrudes on personal privacy,” read the survey’s summary. “Just 34 [percent] say it is more important for the government not to intrude on personal privacy, even if that limits its ability to investigate possible terrorist threats.”

Submission + - Apply for Edward Snowden's old job! (

tobiah writes: Like many of us here I expect your first reaction to Snowden's disclosure on the NSA was "Primo job opening!". And you were correct, Booz Allen Hamilton is now advertising for sys admin position in Hawaii with a $200k salary, all the perks. So polish up those resumés and join the team that watches everything!

Submission + - Font Fight! 13 Best Programming Fonts (

itwbennett writes: The best programming fonts, it’s generally agreed, should, among other things, be monospaced (for code alignment), sans-serif, readable at a small size and clearly distinguish between certain common characters (e.g., zero from the letter O, lower case L from the number 1). Here are some of the most popular over the last 20+ years.

Submission + - Australian Communications and Media Authority releases detailed malware data. (

ozmanjusri writes: The Australian Communications and Media Authority has published detailed statistics of malware infections identified by their online security team (AISI). The team scans and identifies and compromised computers on Australian IP addresses and reports daily to around 130 participating ISPs.

Their breakdown shows about infected 16,500 devices are online at any one time. The malware type for all infections is available on the site.

Adding features does not necessarily increase functionality -- it just makes the manuals thicker.