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Comment Re:Open source? (Score 1) 582

He's planning on making it available on Github according to his comments on YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HVkKysDvGA

I plan to post the source to Github by the end of the month (Feb 2016). Gotta do some more commenting. A computer science prof who dinged a lot of students for poor commenting practices has to proceed carefully on that matter. I could put a precompiled exe there as well, but that would require a few changes to the UI. Some of the parameters you'd need to set for your camera and view of the street are currently constants in the code. Not too many.

and

Folks: Progress is good. I'm expecting a public github posting of the source, a characterization of all of the strings you can pull via various in-code constants and input parameters, and a combined VST overview and simple user manual soon now. Keep an eye on https://github.com/pfr/VideoSp.... I'll be making it public as soon as I can. And thanks to help from my Github son, there will be Mac and Linux compilable versions available in addition to my Wintel version.

Comment Re:Open source? (Score 1) 582

Coming soon to github, according to Paul Reynolds:

Paul Reynolds 3 days ago I plan to post the source to Github by the end of the month (Feb 2016). Gotta do some more commenting. A computer science prof who dinged a lot of students for poor commenting practices has to proceed carefully on that matter. I could put a precompiled exe there as well, but that would require a few changes to the UI. Some of the parameters you'd need to set for your camera and view of the street are currently constants in the code. Not too many.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HVkKysDvGA

Comment Re: legalism is a crap philosophy. (Score 1) 582

Once you get that drilled into them you don't have to worry about them getting run over as they stay away from the road and practice crossing it safely.

Well, in NYC there is a rash of cars, SUVs, buses, and trucks driving up on the sidewalk and mowing down the folks who are standing and walking there. Or plowing through the windows of restaurants and shops.

So don't stop worrying yet about your kids getting run over; they might be talking with a friend on a sidewalk or eating lunch in a restaurant.

Comment Re:Dear black and whiter (Score 1) 582

Often the transition from a high-speed road to a low-speed (e.g., "residential") road is essentially seamless, and drivers don't get the immediate feedback needed for them to quickly adjust their vehicle's speed even if they wanted to (and some don't).

That's where making the slower road less easily navigable comes in. When a driver sees a tree or a concrete pillar directly in front of him, he will usually slow down and begin to pay more attention the road.

Comment Re:Complete article below: (Score 2) 225

So instead of carrying the extra production staff when "business is slow", they chose to hire "expensive" janitors and cafeteria workers (who were probably paid less than regular janitorial/cafeteria staff would have been, but their contracting company made a killing).

I have no sympathy for that kind of management and believe that it's destroying, if it hasn't already destroyed, the workplace.

Comment Re:Crescent won't learn (Score 1) 329

I think that the problem may be that one can't know in advance which child will progress from "mild rash" to anaphylaxis the next time they eat what they are allergic to, so any indication of allergy results in exercising maximum caution. When it becomes more predictable (research $ at work) this will probably change.

Comment Re:Interesting. (Score 1) 54

I'm not saying that deep wells are necessarily free of arsenic, but your characterization of the cause of arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh is at odds with what was reported here:

http://science.time.com/2010/06/19/study-says-arsenic-poisons-millions-in-bangladesh%E2%80%94but-theyre-not-the-only-ones/

Millions of tube wells were drilled to provide villagers with clean water, but many of them were dug into shallow layers of ground that had naturally occurring arsenic, contaminating the water.

Comment Re: Pretty standard procedure on a large campus (Score 1) 284

Interesting. I thought it was a legal requirement that a 911 call show the actual address of the caller if it's a landline (which should include VOIP). Cellular calls can be at least roughly located via triangulation if GPS isn't available. Have you spoken with your local EMS to tell them that calls from your desk will show the incorrect location information?

Comment Re:Pretty standard procedure on a large campus (Score 1) 284

Companies don't want to have a record of lots of 911 calls for their employees, it's that simple. It's not a question of opening doors.

Call 911, let them start on their way and let EMS contact security at the company to let them in. Any EMS worth their name knows the layout and contact numbers for someplace as huge as an Amazon warehouse.

Comment Re: Simple (Score 1) 166

Googling a bit (see, on-topic :-)) brought me to this from 2009:

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2009/05/update-about-911-and-disconnected-landlines/index.htm

At which time it appeared that NY State (where I tested this) was one of the states that had some sort of "soft-tone" requirement. Apparently that is no longer the case.

As some of you have pointed out in our recent post, Using your cell phone as your home phone comes with a risk, some states do require local carriers to maintain a "soft" or "warm" dial tone, which allows you to call 911 on a line that has been disconnected or is otherwise inactive.

An up-to-date-list of affected states is elusive; we struck out in obtaining one from the FCC and some industry groups. However, the following are likely states for some form of soft-tone requirement; we assembled the list from data in an FCC report published in 2000 (Adobe Acrobat software required) and a North American Numbering Council (NANCE) report published in 2002 (link requires Microsoft Word or compatible word processing software).
...
However, we can't confirm that coverage is in effect in all those states today. Also, some soft-tone coverage is limited, in time or other respects. For example, according to the NANCE report, emergency service in Oklahoma is mandated for only 30 days following the suspension of service. In Ohio, the period is only 14 days.

Comment Re: Simple (Score 1) 166

Are you talking about US federal law or some state or local law?

The reason I ask is because I tested some copper phone jacks that once-upon-a-time had landline service to them but no longer have service, and there is no dialtone (but there is still power to make the lights on the phone light up). Thinking that perhaps one could still call 911 without a dialtone, but not wanting to waste EMS time handling a bogus call I contacted Verizon support (1-800-VERIZON) to ask.

The representative I spoke with said that a disconnected landline cannot dial 911; that the requirement to be able to do so holds only for wireless phones.

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