Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re: yeah, going with not creepy. (Score 1) 130

There are many different types of disasters, and certainly plenty that won't necessarily cause the Internet to go down. And as far as people panicking if grandma isn't tagged as safe, that's the whole point of letting friends mark other friends as safe. Maybe grandma was able to call uncle Jimmy 1000 miles away and so he was able to mark her as safe.

Comment: Re:Forgot their customers (Score 1) 100

by SwabTheDeck (#42061133) Attached to: NTSB Dumps BlackBerry In Favor of iPhone 5

Why does the average worker need access to facebook and twitter? they are paid to work not to slack of tweeting and updating profiles.

Maybe because when you give your employees a bit of freedom, they don't feel like they're working under a fascist regime and are therefore happier to be at work and become more productive.

Comment: Dubious Math? (Score 1) 461

by SwabTheDeck (#41592313) Attached to: Study Shows Tech Execs Slightly Prefer Romney Over Obama

64 percent favoring the former governor from Massachusetts, and only 41 percent favoring the incumbent president

It's been awhile since I've been in school, but aren't percentages like this supposed to add up to 100? Also, if this is [somehow] correct, how can a 23% difference be called slight, as the title says?

Comment: Re:Windows 8 is not a catastrophe.... (Score 1) 880

And the analog joystick has far more precision for movement than WADS does. It's still just a matter of personal preference and familiarity.

I'd reckon that a team of console players would get completely slammed by a team of K&M players. This would be especially true if the console players had the auto-aim disabled (which is present by default in nearly every console FPS). I don't see how personal preference enters into it. Clearly, one of these tools is better for the job.

Comment: Calling it an "emergency" seems sensational (Score 4, Insightful) 417

by SwabTheDeck (#37366306) Attached to: North Korea Forced US Reconnaissance Plane To Land
It's believable that the GPS system got disrupted, but it's hard to believe that this somehow forced them to land. If they were doing recon, then GPS is pretty critical so that they can exactly pinpoint what they're surveying. However, even the lowliest pilots can navigate without GPS (this is required to pass any level of flight school, let alone military-level). I can understand the mission being scrapped due to this type of disruption, but I can't believe that they were in any sort of danger.

Comment: Re:Meh (Score 4, Insightful) 260

by SwabTheDeck (#35520874) Attached to: Nexus S Beats iPhone 4 In 'Real World' Web Browsing Tests

Isn't the iPhone's A4 CPU supposedly some hundred MHz slower than the the one in the Nexus S, giving it better battery life? I don't think this has anything to do with strangling web apps, just different design goals.

The iPhone 4 is 777 MHz while the Nexus S is 1 GHz. Both are based on the ARM Corext-A8 and both have 512 MB of RAM. Given the difference in CPU speed, the results of the page load tests don't seem far departed from what would be expected. While the Nexus S is still proportionally a little faster, it isn't so wildly so that it can't be attributed to some minor tweaks in the OS or browser software. Using the term "spanked" seems a bit sensationalist in this instance.

Comment: Maybe I'm missing something? (Score 3, Insightful) 500

by SwabTheDeck (#35055760) Attached to: Netgear CEO Says Jobs's Ego Will Bite Apple
In the practical sense, I don't see why Android is considered more "open" than iOS. I realize more of the OS components for Android are fully open source. However, developers are still subject to the rules of the Android store. The phone manufacturers are carriers still have the final say on which features of the OS are actually shipped intact. Users still have to jailbreak Android phones to side-step these artificial limitations. Maybe I'm missing some critical bit of information -- and if so, I'd love to be corrected -- but I don't see much of a difference between the "openness" of the two platforms when it comes to practical usage.

Comment: Will the world save format ever be fixed? (Score 1) 279

by SwabTheDeck (#34626932) Attached to: <em>Minecraft</em> Reaches Beta Status, Price Goes Up
Right now, Minecraft saves worlds by making a huge tree of directories that stores individual data chunks in various sub-directories. Even though the total amount of data is small (my server is only about 10 megs), any time a copy needs to be made to backup or test, it takes an eternity because there are literally over 10,000 files on the disk.

I'm hopelessly in love with the game, but with the frequent software updates, there is also a need for frequent backups to make sure I don't lose all the work of everyone on the server.

Comment: Re:Not going to happen. Here's why. (Score 1) 303

by SwabTheDeck (#33826828) Attached to: Verizon, 4G and iPhones
So, where's the part where you explain why it's not going to happen? AT&T had branding all over their phones before the iPhone came around, so what makes you think Verizon would be unwilling to make the same concession? As far as hardware is concerned, if they go with a combined CDMA/GSM chip, it's likely that the cost to buy the chips from the supplier will be nearly the same, or negligibly higher (~$1-2). For that price, they get access to close to half of the US cell phone market that they didn't have previously. Seems like a good deal to me. If history is any indicator, most of Apple's partners eventually concede to Apple's way of doing business (see: everything in the iTunes store).

Comment: Re:Terrible design (Score 1) 155

by SwabTheDeck (#31372768) Attached to: NVIDIA Driver Update Causing Video Cards To Overheat In Games

Software should not be able to destroy hardware, period. The GPU's cooling system should be designed to safety operate for sustained periods at peak load --- anything less is artificially crippling the hardware and leads to both security and reliability problems.

Great job, NVIDIA: now, malware can not only destroy your files, but destroy your expensive graphics card as well.

This shouldn't be surprising to anyone. Software (or firmware, if you want to make the distinction) has been used to control fans on GPUs, CPUs, northbridges and plenty of other components for many, many years. I think people don't think about the alternative: putting hardware exclusively in charge of fan control. If you choose the hardware method, there is just as much chance of it becoming fucked up due to lack of testing, poor design choices, etc. However, if you ship a million units with faulty hardware, that means you have a million broken units and there is no choice but to recall/replace them. If you use software and you fuck it up, you can patch it, saving your customers the time and hassle of having to return their product or being stuck without a solution for an extended period of time, and at the same time saving your company from potentially devastating financial losses. Frankly, I think all parties benefit with a software solution.

Comment: This fits squarely in the category of "meh" (Score 5, Interesting) 1713

by SwabTheDeck (#30921736) Attached to: Apple's "iPad" Out In the Open
I have both an iPhone and a MacBook and I use and love both everyday. However, I've never thought to myself, "how great would it be to have a 10-inch iPhone?" After watching the live coverage for the last hour, that's basically all this is. The OS and UI are basically the same, just upscaled and optimized in some places for the larger screen. As far as I can tell, there are none of the clever innovations that are typically present in a new Apple product. The only people that I can see this thing appealing to would be people that have a strong fascination for touch screens and people that don't feel that they can properly lounge about with a laptop (as exemplified by Steve Jobs lounging in a love seat during the presentation). I think the only obvious application would be as an ebook reader (side note: I nearly had a fit when they decided to reuse the term iBook to brand their ebooks). The presentation still isn't done so there isn't a word on price, but if it can't come within range of the Kindle and similar devices, I'd say this thing is purely novelty.

Comment: Re:foot.shoot(); (Score 1) 619

by SwabTheDeck (#30806454) Attached to: HandBrake Abandons DivX As an Output Format

Dropping all formats that Windows play by default is IMO a bad decision. It may make the CCCP Project more popular and spur more people to install Quicktime (yuck), but it'll also drive away lots of inexperienced users.

A quick look at the Windows Media Player 12 Wikipedia page indicates that h.264 in an MP4 container (and by extension, a renamed M4V) plays fine in the current version of WMP that ships with Win 7. However, the post says that Handbrake dropped DivX and XviD, which were only given support in the latest version of WMP as well. So really, Handbrake has never supported native WMP formats before WMP 12, unless more was dropped than just DivX and XviD (I'm too lazy to do the research).

All great discoveries are made by mistake. -- Young

Working...