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The Almighty Buck

Submission + - Banned From Kickstarter For Being Cyberstalked (rachelmarone.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Rachel Marone has been a victim of cyberstalking for 10 years. In 2011, she had a project on Kickstarter shut down because of the high volume of spam posted in the comment section of the project. Recently, Marone's manager spoke to Kickstarter again to see how she could avoid having a new project banned if the cyberstalker showed up again. They replied, 'If there is any chance that Rachel will receive spam from a stalker on her project, she should not create one. We simply cannot allow a project to become a forum for rampant spam, as her past project became. If this happens again, we will need to discard the project and permanently suspend Rachel’s account.' On her website, Marone sums up the situation thus: 'I am being told that I cannot crowdfund because I am a stalking victim. Daniella Jaeger is sending out the message that if you are being stalked you are unwelcome on Kickstarter. With so many women being stalking targets this does not seem reasonable to me.'

Submission + - Voyager and the Coming Great Hiatus in Deep Space (txchnologist.com)

MatthewVD writes: "Some time in the next decade, the Voyager probes will run out of juice and finally go silent after almost a half century of exploration. John Rennie writes that the lack of any meaningful effort to follow up with a mission to interstellar space shows the "fragile, inconsistent state of space exploration." It's particularly frustrating since the Voyagers have tantalized astronomers with a glimpse into about how the sun's magnetic field protects us from (or exposes us to) cosmic rays. Have we gone as far as we’re willing to go in space?"
The Internet

Submission + - Internode preps production IPv6 environment (computerworld.com.au)

An anonymous reader writes: Australian ISP Internode will move to a native internet protocol version 6 (IPv6) production environment later this year, following an extensive public trial that included more than 200 “power users”. The migration this year will enable dual stack IPv6 capability for all aspects of Internode’s broadband, Web, mail and hosting services. During the transition, new and existing Internode users must opt in to use the IPv6 environment, but the service provider intends to offer the service to users automatically by the end of the year.

Submission + - BradAss1987 is UK citizen and needs protection (blogspot.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Bradley Manning is UK citizen and needs protection, government told | World news | The Guardian:

Amnesty's UK director, Kate Allen, said: "His Welsh parentage means the UK government should demand his 'maximum custody' status does not impair his ability to defend himself, and we would also like to see Foreign Office officials visiting him just as they would any other British person detained overseas and potentially facing trial on very serious charges."

The response from UK authorities:

"So far, however, Manning's British status has not impinged itself upon the UK authorities. The British embassy in Washington said it had not received any requests to visit Manning in jail. 'It hasn't crossed our path yet,' an official said."

Submission + - Scientists Work to Grow Meat in a Lab (yahoo.com)

codeman07 writes: In a small laboratory on an upper floor of the basic science building at the Medical University of South Carolina, Vladimir Mironov, M.D., Ph.D., has been working for a decade to grow meat.

A developmental biologist and tissue engineer, Dr. Mironov, 56, is one of only a few scientists worldwide involved in bioengineering "cultured" meat.

It's a product he believes could help solve future global food crises resulting from shrinking amounts of land available for growing meat the old-fashioned way ... on the hoof.

Growth of "in-vitro" or cultured meat is also under way in the Netherlands, Mironov told Reuters in an interview, but in the United States, it is science in search of funding and demand.


Submission + - SpaceX Falcon 9 and Dragon make it to orbit (spacex.com)

jnaujok writes: This morning the Falcon 9 rocket carrying the Dragon capsule lifted off from Cape Canaveral at 10:43 Eastern time, after an earlier launch had been scrubbed because of a bad telemetry feed. A little over 9 minutes later, the Dragon capsule separate from the second stage into its intended orbit. Part of the COTS (Commercial access To Space) program, this is the first test of the Dragon capsule by SpaceX to prove it can be used to ferry supplies to the ISS. The Dragon capsule will make two or three orbits before returning to Earth about four hours after launch.

Submission + - Russia moots Nobel Prize for Wikileaks founder (hindustantimes.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Russia on Wednesday suggested to help the jailed whistleblower website WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and nominate him for the coveted Nobel Prize by the NGOs. "Non-governmental and government organisations should think of ways to help him. Perhaps he could be awarded a Nobel Prize," unnamed
Kremlin sources were quoted as saying by RIA Novosti.


Submission + - First Nanosatellite Ejected in Earth's Orbit (spacedaily.com)

digitaldc writes: On Dec. 6 at 1:31 a.m. EST, NASA for the first time successfully ejected a nanosatellite from a free-flying microsatellite. NanoSail-D ejected from the Fast, Affordable, Science and Technology Satellite, FASTSAT, demonstrating the capability to deploy a small cubesat payload from an autonomous microsatellite in space.

Nanosatellites or cubesats are typically launched and deployed from a mechanism called a Poly-PicoSatellite Orbital Deployer (P-POD) mounted directly on a launch vehicle. This is the first time NASA has mounted a P-POD on a microsatellite to eject a cubesat.

FASTSAT, equipped with six science and technology demonstration payloads, including NanoSail-D, launched Friday, Nov. 19 at 8:25 p.m. EST from Kodiak Island, Alaska. During launch, the NanoSail-D flight unit, about the size of a loaf of bread, was stowed inside FASTSAT in a P-POD.

Submission + - Julian Assange Answers Questions from the Public (cnn.com)

GameboyRMH writes: "Julian Assange has responded to some questions posted by Guardian readers. The article contains many interesting bits of information, such as why Assange decided to make himself the public face of Wikileaks rather than remain anonymous, his comments on some of the older content that's recently become unavailable on the site, and his claim that Wikileaks' use of Amazon's services was actually a test of the US as a hosting jurisdiction."

Submission + - Geminid Meteor Shower Defies Explanation (messagetoeagle.com)

stargazer68 writes: Most meteor showers come from comets, which spew ample meteoroids for a night of 'shooting stars.' The Geminids are different.
The parent is not a comet but a weird rocky object named 3200 Phaethon that sheds very little dusty debris—not nearly enough to explain the Geminids.

Submission + - Julian Assange turns himself over to UK authoritie (cnn.com)

sardaukar_siet writes: London (CNN) — WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was arrested Tuesday in London on a Swedish warrant, London's Metropolitan Police said.

Assange was arrested at a London police station at 9:30 a.m. (4:30 a.m. ET) and will appear at the City of Westminster Magistrate's Court later in the day, police said.

Swedish authorities had issued the warrant for Assange so they can talk to him about sex-crime allegations unrelated to WikiLeaks' recent disclosure of secret U.S. documents.


Submission + - No right to lawyer during questioning, SCC rules (www.ctv.ca)

ZDRuX writes: Canadian suspects of serious crimes do not have a constitutional right to have a lawyer present during questioning by authorities, the Supreme Court of Canada said today. .....In the central case, the court ruled 5-4 that Canadians have no right to have a lawyer sit in during an interrogation.

The official ruling can be found here: http://scc.lexum.umontreal.ca/en/2010/2010scc35/2010scc35.html

The first version always gets thrown away.