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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 73 declined, 5 accepted (78 total, 6.41% accepted)


Submission + - Seinfeld Connection to Secret Service Prostitute Affair (youtube.com)

Suki I writes: "From the biggest Seinfeld nut that I know (full disclosure: I *like* Seinfeld): New video from the Secret Service prostitution affair. "Exclusive HD Video: Colombian Prostitute In US Secret Service Scandal EXPOSED! for Android" Includes Patty shouting "Now I wan't my money mister and I ain't leavin' 'till I get it!""
The Internet

Submission + - Internet Inventor Gore's Website Crashed by Drudge (foxnews.com)

Suki I writes:

By Marc Morano Former President Al Gore's website was crashed by Matt Drudge's website on Tuesday afternoon. Gore's site was down from approximately 4:30 PM ET until about 6PM ET. The DrudgeReport.com linked to Gore's claim that "increased heavy snowfalls are completely consistent with... man-made global warming" at exactly 4:29pm ET. Gore's website crashed almost immediately following Drudge's link. The irony for Gore is that he has touted his role of "creating the Internet." "During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet," Gore said during a March 9, 1999 CNN interview. It now appears the creator of the Internet's website is not able to handle traffic from the DrudgeReport.com.


Submission + - U.S. Adminstration In Contempt Over Gulf Drilling (bloomberg.com)

Suki I writes: We live by the rule of law, not under an emperor:

The Obama Administration acted in contempt by continuing its deepwater-drilling moratorium after the policy was struck down, a New Orleans judge ruled. Interior Department regulators acted with “determined disregard” by lifting and reinstituting a series of policy changes that restricted offshore drilling, following the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history, U.S. District Judge, Martin Feldman of New Orleans ruled yesterday. “Each step the government took following the court’s imposition of a preliminary injunction showcases its defiance,” Feldman said in the ruling. “Such dismissive conduct, viewed in tandem with the re-imposition of a second blanket and substantively identical moratorium, and in light of the national importance of this case, provide this court with clear and convincing evidence of the government’s contempt,” Feldman said. President Barack Obama’s administration first halted offshore exploration in waters deeper than 500 feet in May, after the explosion and sinking of the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig off the Louisiana coast led to a subsea blowout of a BP Plc well that spewed more than 4.1 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico.


Submission + - Mubarak supporters clash with Egyptian opposition (news.com.au)

Suki I writes: THE crisis in Egypt lurched into a potentially dangerous new phase overnight as supporters of embattled President Hosni Mubarak faced off with anti-government protesters who defied a military call to disperse.
A crowd of 20,000 Mubarak supporters marched to Tahrir (Liberation) Square in central Cairo, the epicentre of nine days of unrest, far outnumbering the opposition supporters encamped there, Sky News reported.
Images showed the two crowds hurling missiles at each other during running street battles. Sky News correspondents at the scene reported seeing bloodied victims.
There were no signs of intervention by the police or military.

Read more: http://www.news.com.au/breaking-news/mubarak-supporters-clash-with-egyptian-opposition-protesters/story-e6frfku0-1225999085784#ixzz1CoI3fFg2


Submission + - James Bond Composer John Barry, RIP (boston.com)

Suki I writes: This weekend marked the passing of film composer John Barry, who wrote most of the music for the early James Bond movies starring Sean Connery and Roger Moore. Barry was 77, and died in his home in Oyster Bay, NY, where he'd lived with his wife since 1980.

Submission + - China blocks 'Egypt' on Twitter-like site | News.c (news.com.au)

Suki I writes: CHINA has blocked the word "Egypt'' from the country's wildly popular Twitter-like service, while coverage of the political turmoil has been tightly restricted in state media.

China's ruling Communist Party is sensitive to any potential source of social unrest.

A search for "Egypt'' on the Sina microblogging service brings up a message saying, "According to relevant laws, regulations and policies, the search results are not shown.''

The service has more than 50 million users.
News on the Egypt protests has been limited to a few paragraphs and photos buried inside major news websites, but China Central Television had a report on its midday broadcast.

China's Foreign Ministry did not respond to a request for comment on the events in Egypt.

The Almighty Buck

Submission + - Michael Dell Sees Upside of Austerity - Digits - W (wsj.com)

Suki I writes: Many participants in Davos are fretting about anemic Western economies and the potential for inflation elsewhere in the world. Michael Dell isn’t one of them.

The Dell Inc. CEO told The Wall Street Journal that the era of austerity could actually be good for his company in some ways. Mr. Dell reckons it will prod governments, corporations and other institutions to look for ways to boost productivity, and technology is the obvious answer.


Submission + - A Bear That Tweets Out Loud - Digits - WSJ (wsj.com)

Suki I writes: Too busy to log into your Twitter account? Fear no more. A four-inch tall bear has emerged in Japan that can read out every tweet that comes into your account.

The “Charatter,” as it’s known, is Japan’s first tweet-reading character toy. It received an unusually large number of pre-orders online, and has been enjoying brisk sales since its Nov. 30 launch, says a spokeswoman at WiZ, the manufacturer, though the company doesn’t disclose sales numbers.


Submission + - Can Search Engines Compete on Privacy? (wsj.com)

Suki I writes: By Jennifer Valentino-DeVries

A start-up search engine is touting its privacy features in an effort to get users to switch from Google. But is that something people are looking for?

DuckDuckGo, a tiny search engine run by one entrepreneur, pledges not to store any personal information or send search data to other sites. This month, the site began marketing itself using its stance on privacy, specifically taking aim at Google on a website called donttrack.us and a San Francisco billboard that proclaims “Google tracks you. We don’t.”

The claims reference an issue with the way the Internet handles links that users click on when they search the Web. When a link is clicked, the address where the user came from is transmitted to the linked site via something called a “referrer header.” In the case of searches, this address includes the entire text of the search, which DuckDuckGo’s owner, Gabriel Weinberg, says can include things like queries about sensitive topics like health care.

Google, for its part, says these “referrer headers” are used by all major search engines and websites as “part of the architecture of the Web” — something that is traditionally transmitted by a site to tell other sites where visitors are linking from. “We recognize our responsibility to protect the data that users entrust to us and we give them meaningful choices to protect their privacy,” a Google spokeswoman said.


Submission + - Rahm Emanuel Booted from Chicago Ballot (chicagonewscoop.org)

Suki I writes: Former White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel has been ruled ineligible to run for Mayor of Chicago this election:

“We conclude that the candidate neither meets the the municipal code’s requirement that he have ‘resided’ in Chicago for the year preceding the election in which he seeks to participate nor falls within any exception to the requirement.”

Some cities actually require their politicians to live there before running for Mayor and other offices.


Submission + - Keith Olbermann leaves MSNBC (wsj.com)

Suki I writes: Keith Olbermann signs off from MSNBC for the first time, lately (video at that link) From the Wall Street Journal: "Cable host Keith Olbermann and news channel MSNBC abruptly parted ways on Friday night, as the network announced it had agreed to end his contract and the last installment of his show would air that evening.
The surprise announcement strips MSNBC of its most-watched evening anchor after an increasingly tempestuous relationship, coming less than three months after the network briefly suspended the fiery host."


Submission + - King Google to Retire (businessinsider.com)

Suki I writes: Business Insider Reports:
Eric Schmidt is stepping down as CEO of Google and cofounder Larry Page is taking over, the company just announced in its earnings release.
Schmidt will become Executive Chairman, focused on "deals, partnerships, customers and broader business relationships, government outreach and technology thought leadership."
Google's other cofounder, Sergey Brin, will take a more active role in strategic projects including product. He is giving up his role as president.
The change is effective starting April 4, 2011.


Submission + - U.S. says iPad users' data stolen, sets criminal c (reuters.com)

Suki I writes: (Reuters) — U.S. investigators plan to announce criminal charges concerning the alleged theft of email addresses and other personal information belonging to about 120,000 users of Apple Inc's iPad tablet computer.

Prosecutors said the charges arise from an alleged hacking of AT&T Inc's servers, which affected iPad users who accessed the Internet through AT&T's 3G network.

Paul Fishman, the U.S. attorney for the District of New Jersey, and the FBI plan to hold a press conference Tuesday afternoon to discuss the charges.


Submission + - Facebook suspends personal data-sharing feature &# (theregister.co.uk)

Suki I writes: Facebook has "temporarily disabled" a controversial feature that allowed developers to access the home address and mobile numbers of users.

The social network suspended the feature, introduced on Friday, after only three days. The decision follows feedback from users that the sharing of data process wasn't clearly explained and criticism from security firms that the feature was ripe for abuse.


Submission + - Caught Spying on Student, FBI Demands GPS Tracker (wired.com)

Suki I writes: "A California student got a visit from the FBI this week after he found a secret GPS tracking device on his car, and a friend posted photos of it online." Interesting incident. The FBI planted the device in such a clumsy manner it was discovered during an oil change. Afifi's idea to sell the device on eBay was thwarted when the FBI showed up to take the device back.

Mirrors should reflect a little before throwing back images. -- Jean Cocteau