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Submission + - RIAA Wants Net Neutrality to Include Filtering ( 1

I Don't Believe in Imaginary Property writes: "The RIAA is now worried about the FCC's rulemaking concerning Net Neutrality. Specifically, they're worried that the rules might make it difficult for ISPs to filter out copyright infringement and child pornography, so they want to make sure that spying on and filtering internet traffic is okay, so long as it's being done for a good reason, even if it doesn't work correctly and blocks non-infringing content. Incidentally, the RIAA has some justification to lump child pornography and copyright infringement: after all, people might infringe upon the original cover art for the album 'Virgin Killer' which featured a naked under-aged girl in a way that some consider pornographic. The copyright on it belongs to RCA Records."

Submission + - Google trying to scare us out of optin

pcause writes: This article in Ars Technica discussed a proposal by a Virginia Congressman to give you back control of your privacy and make use of your personal and behavioral information opt-in. This scares the pants off of Google and they are trying to scare us with stories of how horrible the Internet will be if we have privacy. It will be terrible for Google's business, as they make more money the more they abuse your privacy, and they make a LOT of money!

Submission + - Comcast Given Power To Throttle Online Gaming (

averyzoe writes: In a surprise ruling today, a Federal Appeals Court ruled that the FCC does not have the power to require Internet providers to give equal access to all Internet content.......the ways that Internet providers could use this ruling to their benefit are quite disturbing. Spending too much time on World of Warcraft? Your cable service could throttle your usage, making many online games difficult, if not impossible to use.

Some programming languages manage to absorb change, but withstand progress. -- Epigrams in Programming, ACM SIGPLAN Sept. 1982