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Comment: Re:Fire them (Score 1) 276

by Strawser (#45370619) Attached to: Snowden Used Social Engineering To Get Classified Documents

Anyone working in the security field who gives up their password is an idiot, and should be fired.

There should have been extremely clear training on that. This is the fault of the people who were managing the staff. If it were one, maybe even two people, sure. But when 25 people don't know that you're not supposed to give your creds to anyone, including an admin, that's bad management.

Comment: PC World does that (Score 1) 1

by Strawser (#45289339) Attached to: Does Software Need a Siskel and Ebert?

How well they do it is anyone's opinion, but they do it. Of course, that's a magazine that's not marketed to the general public. If they were going to do software reviews in media geared for the average American, then it would mostly be reviews of all the wrong software. It would still be interesting to see, and it would probably grow a decent readership, but it would have to keep focusing on stuff like browser plugins, smartphone apps, and utilities like recipe keeping software. Stuff that the average reader would find interesting.

Then there's also the disadvantage that you can only install so much software, so readership might taper off after a while. You can watch as many movies as you want, but there's only so much room on your smart phone when it's already filled with mp3's and bad snapshots.

+ - Silent Circle, Lavabit unite for 'Dark Mail' encrypted email project-> 2

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "Two privacy-focused email providers have launched the Dark Mail Alliance, a project to engineer an email system with robust defenses against spying. Silent Circle and Lavabit abruptly halted their encrypted email services in August, saying they could no longer guarantee email would remain private after court actions against Lavabit, reportedly an email provider for NSA leaker Edward Snowden."
Link to Original Source

+ - Does Software Need a Siskel and Ebert? 1

Submitted by theodp
theodp (442580) writes "Over at Scripting News, Dave Winer laments the lack of serious software reviews in the NY Times. That wasn't always the case, recalls Dave. "When they started doing software reviews in the early 80s it was with the usual Times flair," says Winer. "But somewhere along the line they stopped taking tech seriously. It's as if they would only review Saturday morning television shows. How could television like The Sopranos or Breaking Bad take root in the culture if there was no criticism that discussed it? Yet that's where we are today with software." So, does software need a Siskel and Ebert (or A.O. Scott and Manohla Dargis for you highfalutin NYT readers!)?"

Comment: Re:You'll probably hate Classic Shell less (Score 1) 257

by Strawser (#45275953) Attached to: Chrome Will End XP Support in 2015; Firefox Has No Plans To Stop

When Windows 95 first came out, I replaced "shell=explorer" with "shell=progman" in system.ini so I didn't need to get used to the new interface at the same time I was getting used to all the other changes. In this case, though, I really hate it. Badly.

I'll probably have to learn to live with it at some point, though.

Comment: If they kept supporting it, I'd still use it. (Score 2) 257

by Strawser (#45268351) Attached to: Chrome Will End XP Support in 2015; Firefox Has No Plans To Stop

I only use Windows for dual booting when I need Windows for some reason, which is rare, but XP was a solid and decent version of the Windows family. I'd have kept it if it weren't being sunsetted. I now have Windows 8 on my other partition. I hate the interface, passionately, but luckily I don't have to use it often. I felt like I had to move to 8 just to have software support.

Sad to see it go. It was the first decent OS Microsoft made.

Comment: Re:smash bros (Score 1) 277

by Strawser (#45250701) Attached to: Can Nintendo Survive Gaming's Brave New World?

Thanks, and that's exactly it. I don't care enough about gaming to even know what make and model it is, but I bought it because one title was good enough to justify the entertainment expense. As far as I'm concerned, the entire setup -- console, steering wheel and game media -- is just one driving game.

Comment: Re:smash bros (Score 2) 277

by Strawser (#45235505) Attached to: Can Nintendo Survive Gaming's Brave New World?

Gotta admit, I'm not much of a gamer. I played GT5 at a friends house, and was so in love with it I went and bought one. I basically just asked the guy at the store what I need to play GT5, and he sold me a console, a steering wheel, and the game. So the console is just "that black thing in my living room that has a steering wheel." So, yeah, it's a Xweestationthingie that I play The Car Game on.

In any event, this all goes to the point: A lot of people, like me, who aren't particularly interested in gaming, and (very clearly) have no knowledge of it, still buy a console just to play one game.

Cheers.

Comment: Re:Missing option: (Score 1) 443

by Strawser (#45211203) Attached to: I wish my car could...

No, I got it. It was other people blocking off the passing lane, slowing the flow of traffic, causing traffic to back up, and creating road rage. You were nearly the victim of that bad situation, a situation that was created by someone up ahead blocking the passing lane, and exacerbated by a hyper-aggressive asshole in a big truck. If traffic were flowing smoothly, and the left lane was moving faster than the right lanes, as it was designed to do, then H-AA in the big truck would have been in the far left lane, staying in his lane, moving past you safely.

When you see a traffic jam for "no reason", no wreck or road work or anything, it was generally caused by people blocking passing traffic in the left hand lane. That's what creates these situations on interstates that become extremely dangerous for people back in the line.

An adequate bootstrap is a contradiction in terms.

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