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Submission + - Twitter finally drops the hammer (

atsabig10fo writes: Twitter has finally released their hinted-at changes to their API, including limiting number of users for 3rd party clients, rate limiting, and restrictions on how tweets can be displayed and posted. Third party app developers are certainly going to be sweating these changes, and it puts the future of new development in question. Is it finally time to move on to an open alternative like

Submission + - Microthrusters For Small Satellites (

An anonymous reader writes: A research team led by Paulo Lozano at MIT's Space Propulsion Lab and Microsystems Technology Lab have shown off a microthruster array capable of powering small satellites. The tiny, flat design could obviate the need for bulky propellant tanks. 'To explain how the thruster works, Lozano invokes the analogy of a tree: Water from the ground is pulled up a tree through a succession of smaller and smaller pores, first in the roots, then up the trunk, and finally through the leaves, where sunshine evaporates the water as gas. Lozano’s microthruster works by a similar capillary action: Each layer of metal contains smaller and smaller pores, which passively suck the ionic liquid up through the chip, to the tops of the metallic tips. The group engineered a gold-coated plate over the chip, then applied a voltage, generating an electric field between the plate and the thruster’s tips. In response, beams of ions escaped the tips, creating a thrust. The researchers found that an array of 500 tips produces 50 micronewtons of force — an amount of thrust that, on Earth, could only support a small shred of paper. But in zero-gravity space, this tiny force would be enough to propel a two-pound satellite.'

Submission + - Objective-C Overtakes C++ but C is Number One! (

mikejuk writes: Although the TIOBE Index has its shortcomings, the finding that Objective-C has overtaken C++ is reiterated in the open source Transparent Language Popularity Index. The reason is, of course, that Objective-C is the language you have to use to create iOS applications and as iPads and iPhones have risen in popularity so has Objective-C.
If you look at the raw charts then you can see that C++ has been in decline since about 2005 and Objective-C has shot up to overtake it with amazing growth. But the two charts are on different scales — if you plot both on the same chart you can see that rather than rocketing up Objective-C has just crawled its way passed and it is as much to do with the decline of C++. It simply hasn't reached the popularity of C++ in its heydays before 2005.
However the real story is that C, a raw machine independent assembler like language, with no pretense to be object oriented or sophisticated has beaten all three of the object oriented heavy weights — Java, C++ and Objective C.
Yes C is number one (and a close second in the transparent index).
Now this is something to think about...


Submission + - "Printer Bomb" Malware Spread Via Compromised .htaccess Files ( 2

wiredmikey writes: In late June, security researchers discovered malware that had been launching junk print jobs that waste paper until the printer runs out. Symantec calls the printer malware Milicenso, or the “Printer Bomb”, and code examination marks it as a variant of a malware delivery system discovered in 2010.

Today, after conducting additional research on Trojan.Milicenso, researchers determined that the threat is propagated by a compromised .htaccess file that launches a redirection Web attack. So far, Symantec has been able to count at least 4,000 websites that have been compromised by the cybercriminal(s) behind the attacks.

Research shows that the attack dated back to at least 2010, and the attacker(s) used different domain names to prevent them from being blocked or blacklisted. According to Symantec, “In 2010 and 2011, the gang moved to a new domain every few months. But in 2012, they changed domains almost every day."


Submission + - Higgs boson-like particle discovery claimed at LHC! ( 1

packetspike writes: "Cern scientists reporting from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have claimed the discovery of a new particle consistent with the Higgs boson.

The particle has been the subject of a 45-year hunt to explain how matter attains its mass.

Both of the Higgs boson-hunting experiments at the LHC see a level of certainty in their data worthy of a "discovery".

More work will be needed to be certain that what they see is a Higgs, however.

The results announced at Cern (European Organization for Nuclear Research), home of the LHC in Geneva, were met with loud applause and cheering.

Read more:"

Submission + - OpenROV Kickstarter goes live (

linuxrunner writes: The highly anticipated OpenROV (orinally talked about on slashdot here: is now live, and you can order your kit now. Early bird special $50 off the kit price for the first 20 kit orders.

Video of it in action here:


Submission + - Facebook Flaw Means Anyone Can See Private Photos (

Velcroman1 writes: A surprising security hole in Facebook allows almost anyone to see pictures marked as private, an online forum revealed late Monday. Even pictures supposedly kept hidden from uninvited eyes by Facebook's privacy controls aren't safe, reported one user of a popular bodybuilding forum in a post entitled "I teach you how to view private Facebook photos." Facebook appears to have acted quickly to eliminate the end-run around privacy controls, after word of the exploit spread across the Internet. It wasn't long before one online miscreant uploaded private pictures of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg himself — evidence that the hack worked, he said.

Submission + - Google to cut Mozilla search deal (

nk497 writes: "Google and Mozilla have had a search deal for five years, which made Google the default search engine for the Firefox browser. In turn, Google's royalty payments made up the vast majority of its revenue; Google's cash made up 85% of the royalty money it gets from search engines and other web firms, which makes up most of its total revenue. The latest deal ended in November, but Mozilla and Google are still in "active negotiations" — suggesting Google may pull out. The last deal was signed three years ago, days before the announcement of Chrome, which as since overtaken Firefox as the number two browser worldwide."

Submission + - IT Pros Can't Resist Peeking at Info (

Orome1 writes: IT security staff will be some of the most informed people at the office Christmas party this year. A full 26 per cent of them admit to using their privileged log in rights to look at confidential information they should not have had access to in the first place. It has proved just too tempting, and maybe just human nature, for them to rifle through redundancy lists, payroll information and other sensitive data including, for example, other people’s Christmas bonus details.

Submission + - KS Governor Sends Tweeting Teen to Principal's Off (

kstatefan40 writes: "According to the Wichita Eagle, A Kansas teenager is in trouble after mocking Gov. Sam Brownback during a mock legislative assembly for high school students. During the session, in which Brownback addressed the group, Sullivan posted on her personal Twitter page: “Just made mean comments at gov brownback and told him he sucked, in person #heblowsalot” On Tuesday, Sullivan was called to her principal’s office and told that the tweet had been flagged by someone on Brownback’s staff and reported to organizers of the Youth in Government program. The principal “laid into me about how this was unacceptable and an embarrassment,” Sullivan said. “He said I had created this huge controversy and everyone was up in arms about it and now he had to do damage control.

This has a nice big brother feel to it."


Submission + - Oakland mayor's chief legal adviser resigns over " (

TheClockworkSoul writes: The San Francisco Chronicle reports that Dan Siegel, Oakland Mayor Jean Quan's chief legal adviser, resigned early this morning after what he called a "tragically unnecessary" police raid of the Occupy Oakland camp.

Dan Siegel, a civil rights attorney and one of Oakland's most active and vocal police critics, said the city should have done more to work with campers before sending in police.

"The city sent police to evict this camp, arrest people and potentially hurt them," Siegel said. "Obviously, we're not on the same page. It's an amazing show of force to move tents from a public place."


Submission + - South Korea to block Port 25 in Attempt to Fight S ( 1

Shoe Puppet writes: The South Korean government has a new plan to combat spam: Blocking (or banning?) the standard SMTP port 25. Only Port 587, which by the specifications only accepts authenticated email submissions, will remain open.

Can anyone able to understand the Koran sources provide any more detail?


Submission + - Apple lets head of security go (

An anonymous reader writes: From the Article:
  "Today, Apple let its head of security go. This move comes amidst a hard looking into by Apple on the security of unreleased devices. In March 2010, Apple lost an unreleased iPhone 4, which then was stolen and sold to Gizmodo for $5,000. Similarly, in July of this year, two of Apple's investigators went looking for a lost prototype, posing as police officers. Again, in August of 2011, Apple investigators, this time with plainclothes officers, went and searched the home of Sergio Calderon. This would be fine, if the search was conducted by the officers, but instead, it was conducted by the Apple employee's. The head of security has been in hot water for these events recently. Even beyond the mobile space, there was a 3G Macbook Pro that made its way onto eBay, and then sold within the past year. I'm sure that there are more leaks out there, but may not have gotten mass publication as of yet. "

Submission + - 37 Giant Corporations Paid 0 in Taxes Last Year (

Diggester writes: "Verizon reported an annual profit of nearly $12 billion. The statutory federal corporate income tax rate is 35 percent, so theoretically, Verizon should have owed the IRS around $4.2 billlion. Instead, according to figures compiled by the Center for Tax Justice, the company actually boasted a negative tax liability of $703 million. Verizon ended up making even more money after it calculated its taxes."

Submission + - Alien city lights could be detected across interst ( 1 writes: Top boffins in the US say that it should be possible to detect alien civilisations on planets orbiting other stars by looking for the light of their cities standing out at night.

The proposal comes from Avi Loeb of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) and Edwin Turner of Princeton uni.

"Looking for alien cities would be a long shot, but wouldn't require extra resources. And if we succeed, it would change our perception of our place in the universe," says Loeb.

The plan relies on the assumptions that aliens would use artificial lighting when their location on their planet was turned away from their local star, as humans do. This might not be the case for various reasons, but at least some alien races – if there are a decent number out there – would seem likely to have illuminated cities or something like them.