Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Note: You can take 10% off all Slashdot Deals with coupon code "slashdot10off." ×

Comment Re: Since you're soliciting people's opinions (Score 1) 123

I don't think it's fair to say opinion. There are objective metrics that can be optimized for (price, coverage, speed). So an objective factual response is possible. Though the vi/emacs question is similar I guess - vi is objectively better and it is foolish to argue otherwise.

Comment Re:Australia take note... (Score 4, Interesting) 253

It is likely true that they don't currently have any competition. But Google Fiber is making some inroads, and perhaps they realize that if they don't make any improvements and don't do anything, they are making it easier for disruptive players to enter the market (in whatever form that may take).

Additionally, with the increase of higher bandwidth usage like 4k Netflix as was mentioned or whatever it happens to be, they potentially realized that they were going to have to do something to increase capacity in their backend network if they want to maintain service. People live with traffic volume caps now but as demand for higher caps increases there are going to be more and more complaints, again, opening the field for disruption. Thus they have to beef up their backbone network (my terminology is probably weak as I don't have much knowledge of how ISP networks are constructed and how peering arrangements and such work). You can't really sell an improved backbone network to customers, but if you couple that with last mile upgrades, which are probably going to have to happen eventually anyway, you can drive interest as you prepare for the future.

People are generally willing to pay a little bit more for a service that just works most of the time and is as fast as the other guy. Upgrading their network means that disruptive players have to prove themselves based on something other than speed.

Security

Belgian Government Phishing Test Goes Off-Track 58

alphadogg writes: An IT security drill went off the tracks in Belgium, prompting a regional government office to apologize to European high-speed train operator Thalys for involving it without warning. Belgium's Flemish regional government sent a mock phishing email to about 20,000 of its employees to see how they would react. Hilarity and awkwardness ensued, with some employees contacting Thalys directly to complain, and others contacting the cops.

Comment Re:11 rear enders (Score 1) 549

Interestingly you don't mention how much harder bad weather conditions make driving for human drivers, as well. There is a reason that many more than usual accidents happen when the weather is bad, when it's snowing, late at night (sleepy drivers - never heard about a robot getting sleepy), or when the roads are bad and human drivers think they know it all and can continue at top speeds.

Actually, it always seems like many more than usual accidents happy the first two weeks of the snowy road season, and then people adjust to it.

I suspect that driverless cars would adjust quicker and you'd get better results than human drivers.

Nonetheless, the point that driverless cars need to be tested and verified in these conditions before being approved for general use is valid, though probably obvious.

Comment Re:11 rear enders (Score 4, Informative) 549

While perhaps true in some cases, it is rather clear from the linked video that it is entirely the human's fault in this case. Unless you have different 'rules of the road' than we do here and the driverless car was expected to do something else (what exactly are you expecting the driverless car to do? It isn't clear that there were lots of options from the video - perhaps move ahead a foot but it seems like that would at best delay the crash). There were two cars stopped at the light, the Google car was behind it, and there were about four or five car lengths between the Google car and the car that rear ended it. The two cars ahead and the Google car stopped well ahead of the at fault vehicle and the at fault vehicle did not slow down.

Comment Re: 11 rear enders (Score 1) 549

Well, perhaps fault is the wrong word. Obviously drivers are ultimately responsible for their own vehicles.

That being said, distracting things are distracting and I wonder if the same driver would have been distracted if there were no obvious markings that it was a self driving car.

Comment Re:11 rear enders (Score 0) 549

I think it is perhaps *partly* the Google car's fault. Not because of the way that the Google car drives.

I wonder if the Google car itself serves as a distraction to other drives. Perhaps other drivers find themselves driving behind a Google car, reach over to get their phones to take a picture or video or something, and the distraction causes them to make an error while driving.

Comment Re:Isn't Flash extinct? (Score 3, Insightful) 199

Yes, that was the narrative at the time - 'they are taking away our freedom'. In hindsight, even though I probably would have heavily criticized Apple for the move, and would have pointed to it as a reason to choose Android, the reality of the situation was, at least in my experience, that Flash on Android was a rather shitty experience that never really worked that well. And while it seemed arrogant and annoying that Steve Jobs tried to use his sway to annihilate Flash as a platform, I now believe that it was for the best. Flash has a heavy impact on battery life, is generally a lot slower, and is generally less secure than native alternatives.

So, yes, Apple made a seemingly arrogant move and exiled Flash from the iOS platform, but in the long run this drove development toward alternatives and pushed web developers to use technologies that were more mobile friendly (like using HTML for your content instead of some flash application) and I think the overall net effect for the web community has been positive.

Comment Re:The cost of doing business (Score 1) 215

Well sure. I guess I generally assume that when people say 'the cost will be passed on to customers' I read: 'the extra expense will result in an immediate increase in price for services'.

I mean, obviously people realize that the money ultimately comes from customers. If you presume that statement to say otherwise then you clearly misunderstand what is being said.

PLUG IT IN!!!

Working...