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+ - A step closer to explaining high-temperature superconductivity?->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "For years some physicists have been hoping to crack the mystery of high-temperature superconductivity—the ability of some complex materials to carry electricity without resistance at temperatures high above absolute zero—by simulating crystals with patterns of laser light and individual atoms. Now, a team has taken—almost—the next-to-last step in such "optical lattice" simulation by reproducing the pattern of magnetism seen in high-temperature superconductors from which the resistance-free flow of electricity emerges."
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+ - Xfce 4.12 Released

Submitted by jones_supa
jones_supa (887896) writes "The Xfce team is pleased to announce the release of the Xfce 4.12, a new stable version of the fast and optimized desktop environment that supersedes Xfce 4.10, which was released 2 years and 10 months ago. While the version number looks like a small jump, there is a big amount of improvements and fixes all around. Most notable things that have seen changes are: the panel, power management, multi-monitor support, task manager, file manager, optical disc burning (Blu-Ray support), Alt-Tab popup, keyboard shortcuts, and wallpaper selector. An online tour of the changes in the new version is available. Looking into the future, the plan to upgrade from GTK2 to GTK3 is probably the hottest topic in the roadmap."

+ - C++Now 2015 Student/Volunteer Program Accepting Applications

Submitted by jones_supa
jones_supa (887896) writes "Are you a student and passionate C++ programmer? The C++Now 2015 Student/Volunteer program is now accepting applications. The program was started in 2013 in an effort to encourage student involvement in the C++Now conference and the C++ community. Each year, the conference helps a small group of young whipper snappers to attend the event. In exchange, the students help the C++Now staff in running the conference. Volunteers assist with various on-site tasks, such as recording sessions, escorting keynote speakers and setting up the conference picnic. They are able to attend most sessions. Volunteers receive a waiver of their registration fees and stipends for travel-related expenses may be provided. Applications will be accepted from February 5th to March 5th, 2015. Application decisions will be sent out on March 18th, 2015."

+ - Game Theory Calls Cooperation Into Question->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The physicist Freeman Dyson and the computer scientist William Press, both highly accomplished in their fields, had found a new solution to a famous, decades-old game theory scenario called the prisoner’s dilemma, in which players must decide whether to cheat or cooperate with a partner. The prisoner’s dilemma has long been used to help explain how cooperation might endure in nature. After all, natural selection is ruled by the survival of the fittest, so one might expect that selfish strategies benefiting the individual would be most likely to persist. But careful study of the prisoner’s dilemma revealed that organisms could act entirely in their own self-interest and still create a cooperative community.

Press and Dyson’s new solution to the problem, however, threw that rosy perspective into question. It suggested the best strategies were selfish ones that led to extortion, not cooperation.

Plotkin found the duo’s math remarkable in its elegance. But the outcome troubled him. Nature includes numerous examples of cooperative behavior. For example, vampire bats donate some of their blood meal to community members that fail to find prey. Some species of birds and social insects routinely help raise another’s brood. Even bacteria can cooperate, sticking to each other so that some may survive poison. If extortion reigns, what drives these and other acts of selflessness?"

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+ - With Not Impossible's technology, ALS patient speaks for first time in 15 years->

Submitted by TechCurmudgeon
TechCurmudgeon (3904121) writes "From TechRepublic: Don and Lorraine Moir were married in 1989. Over the next six years, they had three children together and spent their days happily living in London, Ontario. Then, Don was diagnosed with ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease, a progressive neurodegenerative disease that weakens muscles and impacts physical function.

By May 1999, Don was on a ventilator. He hasn't spoken a word since. Not Impossible Labs gave him his voice back using a special keyboard and open source technology."

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+ - Splitting HARES, Military Grade Crypto in Malware->

Submitted by Dharkfiber
Dharkfiber (555328) writes "Andy Greenberg @ Wired Magazine writes, "Software reverse engineering, the art of pulling programs apart to figure out how they work, is what makes it possible for sophisticated hackers to scour code for exploitable bugs. It’s also what allows those same hackers’ dangerous malware to be deconstructed and neutered. Now a new encryption trick could make both those tasks much, much harder." New crypto tricks being added to Malware, SSL, Disk, and now HARES packaging."
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+ - Measuring the value of open hardware designs-> 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Industry knows open source software has an immense value, but how valuable is an open hardware design? To answer that question, Dr. Joshua Pearce, an associate professor at Michigan Tech University analyzed three methods to quantify the value of open hardware design in the latest issue of the journal Modern Economy."
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+ - RMS Objects To GNU Emacs Having Support For LLVM's Debugger->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Richard Stallman is in a tizzy over the prospects of GNU Emac's Gud.el supporting LLVM's LLDB debugger. Stallman says it looks like there is a systematic effort to attack GNU packages and calls for the GNU to respond strategically. He wrote his concerns to the mailing list after a patch emerged that would optionally support LLDB alongside GDB as an alternative debugger for Emacs. Other Emacs developers discounted RMS' claims by saying Emacs supports Windows and OS X, so why not support a BSD-licensed compiler/debugger? The Emacs maintainer has called the statements irrelevant and won't affect their decision to merge the LLDB support."
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Comment: Live stream link (Score 4, Informative) 75

From the LiveStream Link below...

The Falcon 9 is made up of two parts: a 138-foot-tall first stage, which burns for the first few minutes of flight, lifting the craft up to an altitude of about 50 miles before separating and falling back to Earth, and a smaller, 49-foot-tall second stage, which burns for another five minutes or so, carrying the spacecraft into orbit before disconnecting and falling back down to earth as well.

Normally, both of these stages — as well as the stages that make up other rockets in general — break up into pieces as they plummet downward, eventually sinking in the ocean and becoming unusable. But on Sunday, as the first stage falls back to earth, SpaceX will fire its engines in order to stabilize and guide it in for a controlled landing.

The plan is to land it on an autonomous uncrewed barge, which is being stationed about 370 miles east of Cape Canaveral. As the rocket descends, steerable fins affixed to its outside will help guide it and slow it down. As it nears the barge, a set of legs will unfold from the bottom of the rocket, and if all goes to plan, it'll slow down to a speed of about 4.5 miles per hour before gently landing on them, fully upright.

To solve the problem from the last attempt, the rocket will be carrying more hydraulic fluid.

http://www.vox.com/2015/2/8/79...

+ - The powerful cheat for themselves, the powerless cheat for others.: ArsTechnica-> 1

Submitted by SternisheFan
SternisheFan (2529412) writes "(From http://arstechnica.com/ by Cathleen O'Grady — Feb 7 2015

The powerful cheat for themselves, the powerless cheat for others The upper class isn't less ethical, just more likely to lie for selfish reasons.

Research has previously shown that upper-class individuals are more likely to behave unethically than lower-class people. But, says David Dubois, lead researcher of a new paper in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, it’s not that simple: both groups behave unethically in different contexts.

Dubois’ research group found that people with higher socioeconomic status (SES) were more likely to behave unethically when the behavior benefitted themselves, while lower-SES people were more likely to be unethical to benefit other individuals. "Many people think of unethical behaviour in terms of selfish behavior—violating moral standards to give yourself an advantage," explains Jared Piazza, who was not involved with the research. "But the researchers here draw a distinction between violating a moral standard like 'it’s wrong to steal' to benefit others, and violating a moral standard to benefit yourself."

This distinction is important, says Dubois. Previous research has only tested unethical behavior that is selfish—it turns out that when unselfish unethical behavior is tested too, lower-SES individuals are just as likely to be unethical......

......There's also a question about what actually counts as wrong in people's minds, Piazza notes. Past research has shown that powerless people think that working for the welfare of others is the highest moral value, while powerful people care more about rules and order. "It may be that powerless individuals are less inclined to view actions that help others as actual transgressions even though a moral rule has been violated," he suggests.

Beyond clarifying these points, there are questions to follow up in the future, Dubois adds. For one, this paper didn’t look at the effect of power or SES on the amount of unethical behavior. That is, the researchers looked at how people would behave in a single test, but not at whether a certain group was more likely to be unethical more of the time. There’s also the possibility that different cultures with different moral codes and ideas about power and responsibility might respond differently.

It could have useful application in persuasion, he adds: communicating with different audiences about ethical behavior could emphasize different consequences, either for the self or for others, to discourage the behavior."

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