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+ - Android "Not Compatible" Malware "maturing"->

Submitted by SternisheFan
SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Mobile malware reaches new heights

By Cory Bennett — 11/20/14 04:58 PM EST
Cyber criminals are reaching a level of sophistication when targeting smartphones previously only seen in desktop computer attacks.

Mobile security research firm Lookout revealed findings on Thursday showing hackers can now effectively turn Android phones into so-called botnets, a compromised device that can be used to communicate with other infected devices for nefarious purposes.

The company estimates between 4 million and 4.5 million phones in the U.S. have been turned into botnets this year as a result.
For years, cybersecurity experts knew malware targeting smartphones was a growing threat as the Internet-connected devices became more ubiquitous.

Lookout thinks this malware shows the threat has finally taken a dangerous jump.

The malware has been getting onto smartphones by first infecting a legitimate website. When users visit that website from their phone, they unwittingly download the malicious code.

This particular strategy is “one of the first times hacked websites were used at a large scale to specifically target and infect mobile devices,” said Tim Strazzere, Lookout’s lead research and response engineer, in a blog post.

The malware behind it, dubbed NotCompatible, was initially “compelling threat” when the company started tracking it two years ago, Strazzere explained. But NotCompatible has evolved.

The newest iteration “set a new bar for mobile malware sophistication and operational complexity,” Strazzere said. “This malware is a prime example of how mobile malware complexity is advancing and is borrowing technical tactics already seen in PC malware.”

National Security Agency Director Michael Rogers sees mobile hacking as a Top 3 concern in 2015.

“The greatest growth these days” in cyberattacks “is not in the corporate fixed, large-network structures,” he testified before the House Intelligence Committee on Thursday.

“We are all turning to mobile digital devices as vehicles to enhance our productivity,” Rogers added.

That makes those devices a desirable target for hackers.

Lookout said the hackers behind the malware are renting out the infected devices to criminals who then conduct large-scale scams — from buying up tickets in bulk to sending out more spam.

“We expect more of this type of sophistication in mobile malware,” Strazzere said. “Mobile malware maturity is here.”"

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 1) 326

by itsenrique (#48397951) Attached to: Apple Disables Trim Support On 3rd Party SSDs In OS X
Just get a SquareTrade or similar and go that route then. I was imaging a scenario besides buying a computer and then instantly upgrading the SSD. I was imagining 4 years later, when you still have the laptop but it needs a replacement. Now you have to pay Apple prices (which even used can be steep) or toss it in the trash? Your argument is a bit of a red herring anyway. Mom isn't going to upgrade her SSD for the $50-200 savings, and the person who IS is likely to keep the old one around to swap if they plan on using Apple Care. Final observation: These 1-3 year warranties in addition to law-mandated warranties almost always cost more than they save unless they cover damage that is unquestionable your fault (back to SquareTrade...)

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 5, Insightful) 326

by itsenrique (#48397299) Attached to: Apple Disables Trim Support On 3rd Party SSDs In OS X
That is an interesting point, however I have owned 5 Mac laptops over the years. A G3 PowerBook, A G4, PowerBook, 2 Core Duos and 1 Core 2 Duo. I have owned about the same number of PC laptops. I have not seen any improvement in reliability over the macs except in the case of ultra cheap netbooks that Apple doesn't directly compete with anyway. Neither of our points matter much as they are totally anecdotal. Also, the 20% figure you list is arbitrary and varies over the years. The point I was trying to make you ignore. Why pay more for Apple to preinstall an SSD for you when you can buy the SAME BRAND if not identical model number they use and install it for usually HALF the cost or less than what they charge for the upgrade? Answer THAT. That is what the article is about after all.

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 4, Insightful) 326

by itsenrique (#48397199) Attached to: Apple Disables Trim Support On 3rd Party SSDs In OS X
Because they don't want you buy something with the lowest SSD option then upgrade after market? Why do this? Because you have half a brain and realize the "value" in shininess doesn't work for the SSD, HDD and RAM portions of a computer. Why pay their insane prices when you can not pay them? I for one have one Core 2 Duo MacBook (2008) that was a donation. I love OS X, but this kind of shit makes me not want to buy anything expensive or expected to last years from Apple unless I really feel the need to set money on fire via shiny technology. I hope the Apple crowd stands up and bitches, but more likely they'll just say your "buying it wrong".

Comment: Re:how much does that cost to build? (Score 1) 418

by itsenrique (#48392335) Attached to: Japanese Maglev Train Hits 500kph
Yes, but this seems to have turned into a big Achilles heal as far as our system is concerned. The "traditional" rail folks are usually against high speed trains. Low speed freight is the only type of train that gets political traction here. And, let me be clear: I don't think half the rail proposals I see in the US make any sense. A big reason why is: not elevated, and not fast enough! If its not elevated, why take it? It's merely a glorified bus with dedicated lanes. Do that if that is all there is money for. But at the same time, some parts of the country could use this high speed elevated approach. It requires a high population density and isn't for everywhere. But, I ask, what is the point of a slow passenger train for commuting?

Comment: LA Time article (Score 4, Informative) 337

by SternisheFan (#48390217) Attached to: Philae's Batteries Have Drained; Comet Lander Sleeps
From http://www.latimes.com/science...

Fifty-six hours after landing on the surface of a comet, Philae sent one more round of data about its new home across 310 million miles of space. Then, its power went out.

"@Rosetta, I'm feeling a bit tired, did you get all my data? I might take a nap..." read a message on the @philae2014 Twitter feed.

The Rosetta mission's twitter response: "You've done a great job Philae, something no spacecraft has ever done before."

All the experiments on board the lander had a chance to run and return information back to Earth. Philae's instruments scooped up material from the comet's surface, took its temperature, sent radio waves through its nucleus, and went hunting for hints of organic material. Cameras took the first panoramic images from the surface of a comet.

It has been a whirlwind ride for the lander, which was dropped onto the surface of the mountain-sized comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on Wednesday morning. Two harpoons that were designed to tether it to the surface failed to fire, and scientists say the lander made two bounces before becoming stable. The first bounce caused the lander to go one-third of a mile into the air.

Friday morning, ESA officials expressed concern that the lander would not have enough battery power left to send back any more data from experiments it was conducting on its new, icy home.

When Philae landed on the comet on Wednesday, it had enough battery power for about 60 hours of work. Scientists initially hoped that it would continue to operate on solar power, but the lander seemed to have settled in a hole on the comet, where it was surrounded by rock-like structures that block the sun.

Stefan Ulamec, the lander manager from DLR, said the that one of the solar panels on the lander was getting about an hour and 20 minutes of sunlight a day. Two other panels got just 20 to 30 minutes a day, he said.

At a news conference Friday morning before the last signal was received, Ulamec said it was possible that scientists would not hear from the lander again.

"We are hoping to get contact again this evening, but it is not secured," he said. "Maybe the battery will be empty before it talks to us."

Happily, that turned out not to be the case. On Friday evening, ESA reported that all the science experiments had been deployed, and that the lander had been rotated 35 degrees in an attempt to get more sun on one of its larger solar panels.

There is a chance that as the comet flies closer to the sun, the increase in solar energy will allow ESA to communicate with Philae once again.

ESA officials say the odds of that happening are small, but with Philae, the little lander that could, anything is possible.

Comment: And..., battery's out of juice (Score 1) 223

by SternisheFan (#48389649) Attached to: Comet Probe Philae To Deploy Drill As Battery Life Wanes
From www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-philae-lander-data-20141114-htmlstory.html

Fifty-six hours after landing on the surface of a comet, Philae sent one more round of data about its new home across 310 million miles of space. Then, its power went out.

"@Rosetta, I'm feeling a bit tired, did you get all my data? I might take a nap..." read a message on the @philae2014 Twitter feed.

The Rosetta mission's twitter response: "You've done a great job Philae, something no spacecraft has ever done before."

All the experiments on board the lander had a chance to run and return information back to Earth. Philae's instruments scooped up material from the comet's surface, took its temperature, sent radio waves through its nucleus, and went hunting for hints of organic material. Cameras took the first panoramic images from the surface of a comet.

It has been a whirlwind ride for the lander, which was dropped onto the surface of the mountain-sized comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on Wednesday morning. Two harpoons that were designed to tether it to the surface failed to fire, and scientists say the lander made two bounces before becoming stable. The first bounce caused the lander to go one-third of a mile into the air.

Friday morning, ESA officials expressed concern that the lander would not have enough battery power left to send back any more data from experiments it was conducting on its new, icy home.

When Philae landed on the comet on Wednesday, it had enough battery power for about 60 hours of work. Scientists initially hoped that it would continue to operate on solar power, but the lander seemed to have settled in a hole on the comet, where it was surrounded by rock-like structures that block the sun.

Stefan Ulamec, the lander manager from DLR, said the that one of the solar panels on the lander was getting about an hour and 20 minutes of sunlight a day. Two other panels got just 20 to 30 minutes a day, he said.

At a news conference Friday morning before the last signal was received, Ulamec said it was possible that scientists would not hear from the lander again.

"We are hoping to get contact again this evening, but it is not secured," he said. "Maybe the battery will be empty before it talks to us."

Happily, that turned out not to be the case. On Friday evening, ESA reported that all the science experiments had been deployed, and that the lander had been rotated 35 degrees in an attempt to get more sun on one of its larger solar panels.

There is a chance that as the comet flies closer to the sun, the increase in solar energy will allow ESA to communicate with Philae once again.

ESA officials say the odds of that happening are small, but with Philae, the little lander that could, anything is possible.

"If that makes any sense to you, you have a big problem." -- C. Durance, Computer Science 234

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