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Comment Re:This is highly offensive. (Score 4, Funny) 191

Comment Re:Information density (Score 1) 465

The tactile nature thing is entirely subjective, I agree. For flicking through and bookmarking, I do find physical books more user-friendly if I need to cross-reference several pages within a book; I can stick a bookmark (or finger) on each page and rapidly flick from one to another. That's more of a chore with an ereader. But it's personal preference, I know.

Another advantage of ebooks besides the information density that I forgot to mention in my first comment is searching. For keeping track of important or favourite passages, searching can remove the need for bookmarking if one can remember a significant word or two. And it's more useful than a physical index.


Comment Information density (Score 1) 465

I live in a small flat with insufficient space to store lots of books. My Kindle solves that problem.

Reading ebooks is a completely different experience to reading paper books. I miss the tactile nature of paper books, the physical bookmarkability, and the ease of flicking through them. But the practical problem of storage space that ebooks solve is, for me, a more important consideration.



Submission + - Dollar Apps Killing Traditional Gaming? ( 1

donniebaseball23 writes: There can be no denying that the rise of smartphones and tablets has had a major impact on the gaming business. The prevalence of free and 99-cent apps has changed consumers' perception of value. Mike Capps, president of Gears of War developer Epic Games, told IndustryGamers, "If there's anything that's killing us [in the traditional games business] it's dollar apps. How do you sell someone a $60 game that's really worth it ... They're used to 99 cents. As I said, it's an uncertain time in the industry. But it's an exciting time for whoever picks the right path and wins."

Comment Re:Good Bye (Score 2) 263

The only thing I don't like about chrome is it's lack of good RSS support

I like RSS Live Links for subscribing to RSS feeds in Chrom{e,ium}. I find it to be a fine replacement for Firefox's live bookmarks. I have no idea whether it'll be any use to you, but there it is.

(I'm not associated with RSS Live Links in any way other than as a happy user).



Submission + - Debian 6.0 Released (

Tubal-Cain writes: The Debian Project has announced the release of version 6.0 (codenamed "Squeeze") of their popular operating system. This version, the first first since they adopted a release schedule a year and a half ago, features KDE 4.4.5, Gnome 2.30, 2.7, and the Linux 2.6.32 kernel. They are also introducing a port to a FreeBSD kernel on x86 and x86_64 platforms. Accompanying this new version is an updated layout for their websites, bringing a bit of consitency between their home page, wiki, package search, etc.

Submission + - Debian 6.0 Released In Linux, FreeBSD Flavors ( 1

itwbennett writes: After two years of work, the Debian Project has announced the release of Debian 6.0. 'There are many goodies in Debian 6.0 GNU/Linux, not the least of which is the new completely free-as-in-freedom Linux kernel, which no longer contains firmware modules that Debian developers found troublesome,' says blogger Brian Proffitt. And in addition to Debian GNU/Linux, Debian GNU/kFreeBSD is introduced as a technology preview. 'Debian GNU/kFreeBSD will port both a 32- and 64-bit PC version of the FreeBSD kernel into the Debian userspace, making them the first Debian release without a Linux kernel,' says Proffitt. 'The Debian Project is serious about the technology preview label, though: these FreeBSD-based versions will have limited advanced desktop features.' Installation images may be downloaded right now via bittorrent, jigdo, or HTTP.

Real computer scientists like having a computer on their desk, else how could they read their mail?