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Comment: Re:Games and movies (Score 1) 132

Which is why we have a dozen games or so in the Call of Duty franchise alone?

That's because they are maintaining the franchise. Just like the always-derided Madden series, they've long been established as popular and will continue to churn out the same things as long as people will keep buying them.

Comment: Re:You must be smarter than them. (Score 2) 433

by SteffenM (#44126593) Attached to: Reject DRM and You Risk Walling Off Parts of the Web, Says W3C Chief

Way to completely fuck up your own point by blaming the wrong group of people.

It's Publishers that don't value the consumer. It's Publishers that want DRM on everything they own the copyright for. It's Publishers that want to enforce these draconian rulesets limiting your access to content across various media so they can force you to pay per platform rather than per piece of content.

Get it right.

Comment: Re:Destroying the High Wage Jobs (Score 1) 344

by SteffenM (#43561973) Attached to: New Study Suggests No Shortage of American STEM Graduates

Because there's a difference in raking in the cash because you make a premium product and people are willing to pay for it, and selling your products at a premium so that you can pay back your investors.

One indicates the company is a market leader, the other indicates the company direction is beholden to a bunch of idiots with money who only want more of it.

Comment: Re:The Stupidity, It Hurts! (Score 1) 1006

by SteffenM (#43275669) Attached to: Video Game Industry Starting To Feel Heat On Gun Massacres

You DO realize that the 2nd amendment states that the people's right to keep and bear arms is predicated on them maintaining a "well regulated milita", right?

The 2nd amendment does NOT condone everyone and their uncle hoarding a fucking ARSENAL so they can have masturbation fantasies of going all Neighborhood-Commando when the Federal Government finally decides that the lives and safety of the general public are no longer a concern of the State so or course they'll send out platoons of shock troopers over hill and dale to mow down the poor defenseless chattel, or some other idiotic conspiracy-theory reason.

Comment: Re:Cue the (Score 1) 299

by SteffenM (#42791641) Attached to: FCC Proposal Would Cover the US With Public Wi-Fi

The problem is, of course, that the market already did it's "thing".

That thing was to dice up the country into little fiefdoms for each of the ISPs so they could charge whatever the hell they wanted to, which is why we have studies that show US citizens pay the most per megabyte for internet access than anyone else in the world.

I agree with your reservations about the government directly managing the infrastructure of internet access for all citizens, but maybe they could classify it as a utility and have it regulated similar to electricity and water.

Comment: Re:Brilliant idea (Score 1) 480

by SteffenM (#42628311) Attached to: Google Declares War On the Password
I've had LastPass installed as a browser plugin ever since Gawker got hacked, what 1.5 years ago?

It's... all right. I have a few issues with the service:

  • The login field detection is utter crap for half of the websites I go to, anything with an in-frame popup login field is completely missed. Also, the auto-login functionality seems to be similarly effective, only about half of the time.

  • I really don't like that I have to "edit" my saved login credentials just to see the stored password.

  • I was originally convinced to set up and use LastPass for their customizable, random character password auto-generator. Up until then I had about 4 passwords that I used across all the online logins I had, and they weren't very secure. Given that XKCD has debunked that idea I have grown less interested in random character passwords.

  • Also, they don't have a free Android App. They give out a 2-week trial of their "Premium" version for free, and that's it.

Comment: Re:We need a FLAT TAX, one fair percentage for all (Score 1) 768

The difficulty in choosing something like "net worth" is that it is essentially a self'-reported value, unless you want to give monitoring powers to the IRS or some other third party to vet your claims.

And even then, what constitutes to "net worth"? If we're talking assets held minus liabilities owed, then my student loans should keep me tax free for several years after I graduate next summer. What assets would be counted toward calculating net worth? How would I go about determining the value of my books, or my computer software? I know what I paid for my computer 6 years ago, but how much has it depreciated?

If, by extension, you're suggesting that people start recording and monitoring what they own and at least the aggregate value of it, similar to what businesses do, I'm all for it. Too many people don't know what they own, or if it's worth anything.

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