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Stargoat's Journal: Improper Foreclosures = Claim Jumping 2

Journal by Stargoat
There's been an issue over the last several years of banks improperly foreclosing people's houses. Some years ago, this process would not have been called mistaken foreclosure, but rather claim jumping. Claim jumping was not a phenomenon unique to the various mining rushes, but rather stems from one party or another using the law to force a rightful owner off property. Now of course claim jumping is a bad thing to do, and once upon a time, Americans knew how to deal with claim jumpers. The question is, what's the difference between using a far-away land office to steal someone's hard worked land, and using a far-away (and expensive) judge to repossess a home?

The answer, of course, there is no difference. Claim jumpers are miserable no-good wastes of human flesh and were run off. If they came back, they didn't leave. So what should we do with a bank that mistaken forecloses on someone's property?
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Improper Foreclosures = Claim Jumping

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  • Yes, as through this world I've wandered
    I've seen lots of funny men;
    Some will rob you with a six-gun,
    And some with a fountain pen.

  • by Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) * <seebert42@gmail.com> on Friday September 07, 2012 @05:13PM (#41266997) Homepage Journal

    Snail Mail Phishing Foreclosure [oregonlive.com]
     
    Hopefully that article isn't behind a paywall yet. In August 2011, a homeowner who due to a medical issue had fallen behind on her payments, got an official looking eviction notice. With all the foreclosures going around, and being behind on her payments, she decided to do the honorable thing, put her stuff into a ministorage locker and moved in with her daughter.

    A month later, Occupy Protesters moved in and trashed the place over 9 months of squatting.

    But the letter was a fake- despite some mix up in her loan being sold from Bank of New York to Bank of America, and BofA *starting* foreclosure, they never sent her an eviction notice and the case never made it to court due to the huge backlog out here in Oregon.

    In March, BofA finally contacted her at her daughter's house and offered the option of hiring a Realtor for a short sale- her first hint that she still owned the home. She visited the house with the agent, and found the squaters, who had even signed up for the internet and started receiving mail.

    In May, squater Bryan Wiedeman who had put the water bill in his name but had never paid, was arrested for various acts of vandalism around town. A bill left behind indicated he still owed $530 to the city for water.

    In June, she finally had the Sheriff throw the squatters out. They left behind a bike, an Ipod, bills, and anarchist magazines and newsletters with lists of homes in foreclosure and instructions on lockpicking. They claimed that they didn't send the initial letter.

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