Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Cloud

Don't Be a Server Hugger! (Video) 409

Posted by Roblimo
from the old-stewball-was-the-most-loyal-server-horse-we-ever-done-had dept.
Curtis Peterson says admins who hang onto their servers instead of moving into the cloud are 'Server Huggers,' a term he makes sound like 'Horse Huggers,' a phrase that once might have been used to describe hackney drivers who didn't want to give up their horse-pulled carriages in favor of gasoline-powered automobiles. Curtis is VP of Operations for RingCentral, a cloud-based VOIP company, so he's obviously made the jump to the cloud himself. And he has reassuring words for sysadmins who are afraid the move to cloud-based computing is going to throw them out of work. He says there are plenty of new cloud computing opportunities springing up for those who have enough initiative and savvy to grab onto them, by which he obviously means you, right?
Books

Game of Thrones Author George R R Martin Writes with WordStar on DOS 522

Posted by Soulskill
from the change-is-scary dept.
Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes: "Ryan Reed reports that when most Game of Thrones fans imagine George R.R. Martin writing his epic fantasy novels, they probably picture the author working on a futuristic desktop (or possibly carving his words onto massive stones like the Ten Commandments). But the truth is that Martin works on an outdated DOS machine using '80s word processor WordStar 4.0, as he revealed during an interview on Conan. 'I actually like it,' says Martin. 'It does everything I want a word processing program to do, and it doesn't do anything else. I don't want any help. I hate some of these modern systems where you type a lower case letter and it becomes a capital letter. I don't want a capital. If I wanted a capital, I would have typed a capital. I know how to work the shift key.' 'I actually have two computers,' Martin continued. 'I have a computer I browse the Internet with and I get my email on, and I do my taxes on. And then I have my writing computer, which is a DOS machine, not connected to the Internet.'"
Government

70% of U.S. Government Spending Is Writing Checks To Individuals 676

Posted by timothy
from the that's-rather-a-pointed-description dept.
An anonymous reader writes with this excerpt from Investor's Business Daily:"Buried deep in a section of President Obama's budget, released this week, is an eye-opening fact: This year, 70% of all the money the federal government spends will be in the form of direct payments to individuals, an all-time high. In effect, the government has become primarily a massive money-transfer machine, taking $2.6 trillion from some and handing it back out to others. These government transfers now account for 15% of GDP, another all-time high. In 1991, direct payments accounted for less than half the budget and 10% of GDP. What's more, the cost of these direct payments is exploding. Even after adjusting for inflation, they've shot up 29% under Obama." It's very hard to lay blame on only one part of the U.S. government, though; as the two largest parties are often fond of pointing out when it suits them, all spending bills originate in the House.
Bitcoin

Ask Slashdot: Do You Still Trust Bitcoin? 631

Posted by samzenpus
from the who-can-you-trust? dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes "It hasn't been a great week for Bitcoin. Cruise the Web, and you'll find stories from people who lost thousands (even millions, in some cases) of paper value when the Mt.Gox exchange went offline for still-mysterious reasons. (Rumors have circulated for days about the shutdown, ranging from an epic heist of the Bitcoins under its stewardship, to financial improprieties leading the exchange to the edge of bankruptcy.) But as one Slashdotter pointed out in a previous posting, Mt.Gox isn't Bitcoin (and vice versa), and it's likely that other exchanges will take up the burden of helping manage the currency. Even so, all currencies depend on a certain amount of stability and trust in order to survive, and Bitcoin faces something of a confidence crisis in the wake of this event. So here's the question: do you still trust Bitcoin?"

Comment: Re:Odd (Score 1) 335

by StarWreck (#46328815) Attached to: Why Nissan Is Talking To Tesla Model S Owners
You're right, the Leaf most directly competes with the Volt or even the Prius.

Leaf's biggest problem is their thermal management is under-engineered. Both the Volt and the Tesla have much more thoroughly engineered thermal management systems. It may use up some of the range keeping the battery warm/cool depending on outside conditions but it does a great job keeping the battery from losing half its maximum capacity after only a year.

Comment: Vending Machines of Soda Fountains? (Score 1) 371

by StarWreck (#45850745) Attached to: Coca-Cola Reserves a Massive Range of MAC Addresses
I remember Coca-Cola looked into credit card readers for their vending machines during the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta and the credit card fees back then made the concept completely untenable. I'd be willing to bet a buck that this has more to do with their Coca-Cola Freestyle fountains which automatically phone home whenever a flavor cartridge is low or empty. There might be a ridiculously huge rollout all at once of the machines, like at McDonalds. So far they've only been installed at a few test McDonalds and a few other chains that don't have nearly the coverage of McD's.

Comment: Re:so green (Score 1) 282

by StarWreck (#45378657) Attached to: Germany Finances Major Push Into Home Battery Storage For Solar
I'd done the research myself already. Wood is way more expensive than natural gas unless you grow your own... and Trees take a lot of space and time to grow. And thats an awful lot of work to plant them and then harvest them. I've seen systems that use pellets made from the sawdust swept up from sawmills. That is a lot more cost effective than cut wood.

Comment: Re:Outright bans (Score 1) 376

by StarWreck (#45378631) Attached to: WRT trans fats, the FDA should ...
The problem with DDT was that it was too safe. Since it was "safe" people thought they could bathe entire cities in the stuff so thick it looked like the inside of a fumigation tent. Then the cancers started happening.

If used like a normal pesticide, ie just where its needed in small doses, that the average joe realizes is unsafe to squirt up ones nose, DDT is actually safer that the stuff you buy at Wal-Mart.

When you don't know what you are doing, do it neatly.

Working...