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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 7 declined, 5 accepted (12 total, 41.67% accepted)

+ - Michael Devine has a new lawyer to argue HR antitrust against, APPL, GOOG, ADOB

Submitted by SpzToid
SpzToid (869795) writes "Following up earlier coverage here on Slashdotin the potential antitrust lawsuit between a large class of Information Technology employees, and a few of the largest, most proftibale technology companies in the world.

You may recall Michael Devine, one of the priginal plaintiffs in the case, objected to what amounted to a secret settlement behind his back, as being far too low for the class represented in the case. Mr. Devine has been successful so far in his petition to the judge to hear his motion, and now has gained the representation of Daniel Girard. Asked if he will participate in any negotiations, Girard said "we would certainly expect to be included."

Girard is no stranger to many of the attorneys in the case: he was once a partner at Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein, one of the elite plaintiff firms which reached the $324.5 million deal. Girard has a 19-lawyer firm, Girard Gibbs, and has worked alongside Lieff Cabraser in other class action cases.

Girard, who was referred the case by another lawyer, said it's "a genuine concern" to litigate against former colleagues. But at the hearing in June, he made clear that his objection to the settlement was not the often-raised concern that plaintiffs' lawyers are settling low to make a fast buck on attorneys fees.

Girard told Koh he did not believe attorneys for the tech workers had colluded with the companies or "sold out the case." Rather, Girard said the plaintiffs had simply overstated the risks of going forward given the strength of their evidence."

+ - China smartphone maker Xiaomi apologizes for unauthorized data access 1

Submitted by SpzToid
SpzToid (869795) writes "Following up an earlier story here on Slashdot, now Xiaomi has apologized for collecting private data from its customers.

Xiaomi Inc said it had upgraded its operating system to ensure users knew it was collecting data from their address books after a report by a computer security firm said the Chinese budget smartphone maker was taking personal data without permission. The privately held company said it had fixed a loophole in its cloud messaging system that had triggered the unauthorized data transfer and that the operating system upgrade had been rolled out on Sunday. The issue was highlighted last week in a blog post by security firm F-Secure Oyg. In a lengthy blogpost on Google Plus, Xiaomi Vice President Hugo Barra apologized for the unauthorized data collection and said the company only collects phone numbers in users' address books to see if the users are online.

"

+ - Cable TV boxes are the 2nd biggest energy users in many homes->

Submitted by SpzToid
SpzToid (869795) writes "224 million U.S. cable TV set-top boxes combined consume as much electricity as produced by four giant nuclear reactors, running around the clock. They have become the biggest single energy user in many homes, apart from air conditioning.

Cheryl Williamsen, a Los Alamitos architect, has three of the boxes leased from her cable provider in her home, but she had no idea how much power they consumed until recently, when she saw a rating on the back for as much as 500 watts — about the same as a washing machine.

A typical set-top cable box with a digital recorder can consume as much as 35 watts of power, costing about $8 a month for a typical Southern California consumer. And the devices use nearly as much power turned off as they do when they are turned on."

Link to Original Source

+ - NY Times: Plaintiff Maligns Class-action Deal to Judge in Silicon Valley Suit->

Submitted by SpzToid
SpzToid (869795) writes "Apple has more than $150 billion in the bank, eclipsing the combined cash reserves of Israel and Britain. Google, Intel and Adobe have a total of about $80 billion stored up for a rainy day.

Against such tremendous cash hoards, $324 million is chump change. But that is what the four technology companies have agreed to pay to settle a class action brought by their own employees.

The suit, which was on track to go to trial in San Jose, Calif., at the end of May, promised weeks if not months of damaging revelations about how Silicon Valley executives conspired to suppress wages and limit competition. Details of the settlement are still under wraps.

“The class wants a chance at real justice,” he wrote. “We want our day in court.”

He noted that the settlement amount was about one-tenth of the estimated $3 billion lost in compensation by the 64,000 class members. In a successful trial, antitrust laws would triple that sum.

“As an analogy,” Mr. Devine wrote, “if a shoplifter is caught on video stealing a $400 iPad from the Apple Store, would a fair and just resolution be for the shoplifter to pay Apple $40, keep the iPad, and walk away with no record or admission of wrongdoing? Of course not.”

“If the other class members join me in opposition, I believe we will be successful in convincing the court to give us our due process,” Mr. Devine said in an interview on Sunday. He has set up a website, Tech Worker Justice, and is looking for legal representation. Any challenge will take many months. The other three class representatives could not be reached for comment over the weekend."

Link to Original Source

+ - U.S. D.O.J. implicates Apple, Google, Intel, and others, in no-hire consipracy->

Submitted by SpzToid
SpzToid (869795) writes "Emails to and from the late Steve Jobs may show that several tech companies adopted a "no-hire" policy in which they agreed not to recruit one another's top talent.

The emails were made public Tuesday by a United States federal judge presiding over a lawsuit filed by tech workers against several Silicon Valley tech companies, including Apple, Google and Intel.

"I'm sure you realize the asymmetry in the financial resources of our respective companies," Jobs says in the email.

In another email that seems to be related to "no-hire" policies, Google's then-CEO Eric Schmidt told another Google employee to communicate orally rather than in writing because "I don't want to create a paper trail over which we can be sued later."

Just nice people doing 'nice' things to others, less fortunate and trying compete. /rant

http://www.theverge.com/2013/1/23/3906374/email-exhibits-in-silicon-valley-no-hire-case"

Link to Original Source

+ - Kim Jong Un is People's Daily choice for the sexiest man alive in 2012!->

Submitted by SpzToid
SpzToid (869795) writes "Kim Jong Un is 2012 the sexiest man alive according to People's Daily, which apparently was influenced by an earlier article in The Onion.

Is The People's Press the new People magazine, when it comes to defining which male is most-sexy this year?
http://www.people.com/people/package/0,,20315920,00.html

Hey If Rick Astley can make a 2nd career because of the internet, maybe Kim Jong Un has a chance too. Best of luck."

Link to Original Source
Security

+ - Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta warns of a possibile "cyber-Pearl Harbor"->

Submitted by SpzToid
SpzToid (869795) writes "Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta warned Thursday that the United States was facing the possibility of a “cyber-Pearl Harbor” and was increasingly vulnerable to foreign computer hackers who could dismantle the nation’s power grid, transportation system, financial networks and government.

Countries such as Iran are motivated to conduct such attacks, in retaliation actually.

Perhaps old news around here, even though Panetta is in-fact requesting new legislation from congress and the sentate, isn't the message wise and current that "we would be much better served if we accepted that prevention eventually fails, so we need detection, response, and containment for the incidents that will occur." as Richard Bejtlich has argued in his security blog?

Incidentally, Richard has also written a Top 10 list of the best ways to stir up the security pot (http://taosecurity.blogspot.nl/2012/09/top-ten-ways-to-stir-cyber-pot.html):

  If you want to start a debate/argument/flamewar in security, pick any of the following.

        "Full disclosure" vs "responsible disclosure" vs whatever else
        Threat intelligence sharing
        Value of security certifications
        Exploit sales
        Advanced-ness, Persistence-ness, Threat-ness, Chinese-ness of APT
        Reality of "cyberwar"
        "Builders vs Breakers"
        "Security is an engineering problem," i.e., "building a new Internet is the answer."
        "Return on security investment"
        Security by mandate or legislation or regulation

But seriously folks, time do change, don't they? (Even in the technology sector) Currently the congress is preoccupied with the failure of US security threats in Benghazi, while maybe Leon isn't getting the press his recent message deserves?"

Link to Original Source
China

+ - US Chamber of Commerce infiltrated by a group in C->

Submitted by SpzToid
SpzToid (869795) writes "The Wall Street Journal is now reporting that a group of hackers in China breached the computer defenses of the United States Chamber of Commerce. The intrusion was quietly shut down in May 2010, while FBI investigations continue.

A spokesman for the Chinese Embassy in Washington, Geng Shuang, said cyberattacks are prohibited by Chinese law and China itself is a victim of attacks.

Still, the Chamber continues to see suspicious activity, they say. A thermostat at a town house the Chamber owns on Capitol Hill at one point was communicating with an Internet address in China, they say, and, in March, a printer used by Chamber executives spontaneously started printing pages with Chinese characters."

Link to Original Source

+ - Nasdaq intrusion spreads to listed companies

Submitted by
SpzToid
SpzToid writes "Nasdaq's Directors Desk is a program sold to listed and private companies, whose board members use it to share documents and communicate with executives. Apparently Directors Desk was infected during a breach widely publicized earlier this year. It has now become known that hackers were able to access confidential documents and communications of the corporate directors and board members who received this infected application, said Tom Kellermann, chief technology officer with security technology firm AirPatrol Corp. It is unclear how long the Directors Desk application was infected before the exchange identified the breach, according to Kellermann and another source."

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