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Website Sells Pubic Lice 319 Screenshot-sm

Posted by samzenpus
from the gift-that-keeps-on-giving dept.
A British website called crabrevenge.com will help you prove that there is literally nothing you can't find online by selling you pubic lice. A disclaimer on the site says the creators "do not endorse giving people lice," and the lice are for "novelty purposes only." The company also boasts about a facility "where we do all of our parasite husbandry and carefully considered selective breeding." Three different packages are available: "Green package - One colony that can lay as many as 30 eggs for about $20. Blue package - Three colonies to share with your friends or freeze a batch or two for about $35. Red package - A vial of 'shampoo-resistant F-strain crabs' which can take up to two weeks to kill for about $52."
Image

How Nintendo's Mario Got His Name 103 Screenshot-sm

Posted by samzenpus
from the can't-wait-for-the-origin-movie dept.
harrymcc writes "In 1981, tiny Nintendo of America was getting ready to release Donkey Kong. When the company's landlord, Mario Segale, demanded back rent, Nintendo staffers named the game's barrel-jumping protagonist after him. Almost thirty years later, neither Nintendo — which continues to crank out Mario games — nor Segale — now a wealthy, secretive Washington State real estate developer — like to talk about how one of video games' iconic characters got his name and Italian heritage. Technologizer's Benj Edwards has researched the story for years and provides the most detailed account to date."
Programming

Simpler "Hello World" Demonstrated In C 582

Posted by kdawson
from the non-obfuscated dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Wondering where all that bloat comes from, causing even the classic 'Hello world' to weigh in at 11 KB? An MIT programmer decided to make a Linux C program so simple, she could explain every byte of the assembly. She found that gcc was including libc even when you don't ask for it. The blog shows how to compile a much simpler 'Hello world,' using no libraries at all. This takes me back to the days of programming bare-metal on DOS!"
Microsoft

Microsoft Sends Flowers To Internet Explorer 6 Funeral 151

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the sorry-about-your-loss dept.
Several readers have written with a fun followup to yesterday's IE6 funeral. Apparently Microsoft, in a rare moment of self-jest, took the time to send flowers, condolences, and a promise to meet at MIX. The card reads: "Thanks for the good times IE6, see you all @ MIX when we show a little piece of IE Heaven. The Internet Explorer Team @ Microsoft."
Wii

Wii Hardware Upgrade Won't Happen Soon 325

Posted by Soulskill
from the can't-show-ugly-mario-in-hd dept.
As high-definition graphics become more and more entrenched in this generation of game consoles, Nintendo has had to deal with constant speculation about a new version of the Wii that would increase its capabilities. Today, Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime bluntly denied that a hardware revision was imminent, saying, "We are confident the Wii home entertainment console has a very long life in front of it." He added, "In terms of what the future holds, we've gone on record to say that the next step for Nintendo in home consoles will not be to simply make it HD, but to add more and more capability, and we'll do that when we've totally tapped out all of the experiences for the existing Wii. And we're nowhere near doing that yet."
Operating Systems

Old Operating Systems Never Die 875

Posted by timothy
from the they-just-start-running-in-loops dept.
Harry writes "Haiku, an open-source re-creation of legendary 1990s operating system BeOS, was released in alpha form this week. The news made me happy and led me to check in on the status of other once-prominent OSes — CP/M, OS/2, AmigaOS, and more. Remarkably, none of them are truly defunct: In one form or another, they or their descendants are still available, being used by real people to accomplish useful tasks. Has there ever been a major OS that simply went away, period?"

Comment: Re:The only way to win (Score 4, Insightful) 233

by Spyky (#29281197) Attached to: iPhone App Wins Microsoft App Contest

Yeah, sorry. I use Visual Studio every day and dabble in Eclipse and XCode. I prefer either of the later to Visual Studio. Visual Studio isn't a bad IDE, and it is certainly an appropriate choice for Windows only development, but saying it "light years ahead" of any other environment suggests you have never used anything else.

Sci-Fi

Battlestar Galactica Feature Film Confirmed 342

Posted by timothy
from the more-grace-park-please dept.
Dave Knott writes "Entertainment Weekly reports that Universal Pictures has confirmed rumours of a Battlestar Galactica feature film. Directed by Bryan Singer, and co-produced by original series creator Glen Larson, the new movie will not be related to the recently concluded SyFy Network series. Rather, it will be a 'complete re-imagining of the sci-fi lore that was invented by Larson back in the '70s.'"
United States

The Century's Top Engineering Challenges 290

Posted by samzenpus
from the I-want-talking-fruit dept.
coondoggie writes "The National Science Foundation announced today 14 grand engineering challenges for the 21st century that, if met, would greatly improve how we live. The final choices fall into four themes that are essential for humanity to flourish — sustainability, health, reducing vulnerability, and joy of living. The committee did not attempt to include every important challenge, nor did it endorse particular approaches to meeting those selected. Rather than focusing on predictions or gee-whiz gadgets, the goal was to identify what needs to be done to help people and the planet thrive, the group said. A diverse committee of engineers and scientists — including Larry Page, Robert Langer, and Robert Socolow — came up with the list but did not rank the challenges. Rather, the National Academy of Engineering is offering the public an opportunity to vote on which one they think is most important."

Comment: Re:So What (Score 1) 461

by Spyky (#21211977) Attached to: Leopard Early Adopters Suffer For The Rest of Us
I've had 2 kernel panics (one last night) on a year old MacBook Pro with Leopard. Something about freeing buffers that were already freed. Somebody definitely missed that in quality control. That said, it is a .0 product, no service releases at all, and I've had kernel panics in Vista too (at work). But it's definitely a lot buggier (for me) than Tiger was when it came out. But I like the new features, I have a hard time thinking of features that I want that it doesn't have, Tiger had several areas I thought were lacking (Finder, Mail, printer configuration, network configuration, etc...). I'm confident that Apple will have the issues fixed in some point releases, Tiger at .10 was rock solid.

I had some weird bugs in Leopard Mail.app as well. It got into a loop where it was trying to add mail to the "Sent" folder on an IMAP server, but the IMAP server would return an error, so it would keep trying. But apparently it was actually working while reporting that it wasn't working, so I had the same mail in my sent mail folder 35 times before I finally deleted the settings for the IMAP server and re-added it. It's been fine since then.

-Spyky

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